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Mountain permafrost — research frontiers and a special long-term challenge.

Type of publication Peer-reviewed
Publikationsform Original article (peer-reviewed)
Publication date 2013
Author Haeberli Wilfried,
Project New lakes in deglaciating high-mountain areas: climate-related development and challenges for sustainable use
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Original article (peer-reviewed)

Journal Cold Regions Science and Technology
Volume (Issue) 96
Page(s) 71 - 76
Title of proceedings Cold Regions Science and Technology
DOI doi.org/10.1016/j.coldregions.2013.02.004

Abstract

Advanced methodologies such as core drilling, borehole logging/monitoring, geophysical tomography, high-precision photogrammetry, laser altimetry, GPS/SAR surveying, miniature temperature data logging, geotechnical laboratory analyses, numerical modelling, or GIS-based simulation of spatial distribution patterns in complex topography at regional to global scales have created a rapidly increasing knowledge basis concerning permafrost in cold mountain ranges. Based on a keynote presentation about mountain permafrost at CFG8 in Obergurgl 2012, a brief summary is provided concerning primary research frontiers and the long-term challenge related to the increasing probability of far-reaching flood waves in high-mountain regions originating at newly forming lakes as a consequence of large rock falls and landslides from destabilising steep rock walls with conditions of warming and degrading permafrost often in combination with de-buttressing by vanishing glaciers. Research is especially intense in the densely populated European Alps.
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