Project

Back to overview

The interface between human and animal health in West African nomads: towards "the one medicine".(PROSPER)

Applicant Zinsstag Jakob
Number 52026
Funding scheme Ambizione
Research institution Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Public Health and Health Services
Start/End 01.09.1998 - 31.08.2002
Approved amount 559'725.00
Show all

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
The term " the one medicine ", promoted by Calvin Schwabe, means that medicine's common pool of knowledge shares the same paradigms in the human and veterinary field. This unifying view is rarely more justified than in extensive pastoral environments, whose nomadic populations appear to be most vulnerable for exclusion from the health system and whose health status in terms of mortality and morbidity is virtually unknown. The goal of this proposal is to contribute to the development of a delivery system to improve health care for nomad communities, based on a desectorized, joint human and veterinary medical approach with emphasis on the control of zoonotic diseases. The main objectives are to assess and develop synergies between veterinary extension services and the provision of primary health care, to quantifiy the importance of selected zoonotic diseases, and to develop and test models for integrated human and animal health care for nomad populations based on a " one medicine concept ". Firstly, the importance and priorities of selected zoonotic diseases on health in nomad populations will be quantified. In an interdisciplinary approach, human and animal health status determinants will be simultaneously assessed, using a combination of biomedical and agroecosystem health methodology. Complementary, the perception of disease priorities of nomad populations will be assessed and contrasted to the biomedical health status results. In a second step, the importance of selected zoonotic diseases in terms of attributable fractions on health in nomad populations will be quantified. On this basis, models for integrated human and animal health care for nomad populations will be developed, including a composite human and animal health determinant for nomad well-being in analogy to the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY's) approach. Results will be compared to data collected on animal health and zoonoses in The Gambia, Côte d'Ivoire and other West African countries within an existing informal network. In a third step, synergies between veterinary extension services and the provision of primary health care to nomad populations will be assessed. A program to evaluate efficiency of pilot public health posts for nomads will be initiated and evaluated in terms of ease of introduction, applicability and cost effectiveness. Promissing health service packages will be proposed to donors for extension and long term validation. This working programme covers three years and is based on an already existing network of international collaboration. The Swiss Tropical Institute with its long record of research in tropical diseases and public health is an optimal place to carry out this project.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

-