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Intuition and “jumping to conclusions” in schizophrenia: Studying the temporal relationship in daily life and with neuroimaging

English title Intuition and “jumping to conclusions” in schizophrenia: Studying the temporal relationship in daily life and with neuroimaging
Applicant Zander-Schellenberg Thea
Number 179897
Funding scheme Ambizione
Research institution Fakultät für Psychologie Universität Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Psychology
Start/End 01.09.2019 - 31.08.2023
Approved amount 913'776.00
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Keywords (5)

daily life; fMRI; jumping-to-conclusions bias; schizophrenia; intuition

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
Intuition und sprunghaftes Schlussfolgern bei Schizophrenie: Untersuchung imtäglichen Leben und in der neuronalen Bildgebung
Lay summary
Es wurde bereits mehrfach gezeigt, dass Patientinnen und Patienten mit Schizophrenie einige kognitive Besonderheiten zeigen, wie zum Beispiel das voreilige Schlussfolgern, welches zu Urteilsverzerrungen führen kann. Die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen für dieses Phänomen sind jedoch noch nicht ausreichend erforscht.

Das Forschungsprojekt zielt daher darauf ab, die zugrundeliegenden neurokognitiven Mechanismen des voreiligen Schlussfolgerns zu untersuchen. Dabei soll auch erstmals untersucht werden, ob und inwiefern intuitive Urteils- und Entscheidungsprozesse hierbei eine Rolle spielen.

Zu diesem Zweck werden in Kooperation mit den Universitären Psychiatrischen Kliniken Basel Patientinnen und Patienten mit Schizophrenie klassische Aufgaben zum voreiligen Schlussfolgern und zur Intuition lösen.

Das Projekt bedient sich dabei eines multi-modalen Ansatzes und verwendet sowohl die Methode der funktionellen Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRI) als auch die Methode des ambulanten Assessments von Symptomen und kognitiven Phänomenen via Smartphones.

Insgesamt wird ein grundlagenwissenschaftliches Ziel verfolgt, indem die Ergebnisse des Projektes zur Erweiterung bestehender neurokognitiver Modelle zur Entscheidungs- und Urteilsfindung bei Schizophrenie beitragen werden.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 03.07.2019

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Coronavirus conspiracy beliefs in the German-speaking general population: endorsement rates and links to reasoning biases and paranoia
Kuhn Sarah Anne Kezia, Lieb Roselind, Freeman Daniel, Andreou Christina, Zander-Schellenberg Thea (2021), Coronavirus conspiracy beliefs in the German-speaking general population: endorsement rates and links to reasoning biases and paranoia, in Psychological Medicine, 1-15.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Prof. Roselind Lieb Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure
Prof. Christian Huber Switzerland (Europe)
- Research Infrastructure
PD Dr. Christina Andreou Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Dr. Julian Möller Switzerland (Europe)
- Research Infrastructure
Prof. Daniel Freeman Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication

Abstract

Background: Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that heavily affects daily-life functioning by distorting perception, cognition, emotion, and behavior. Previous research has observed certain cognitive characteristics in patients with schizophrenia, such as the tendency to arrive early at decisions without accumulating enough evidence beforehand. This has been called the jumping-to-conclusions bias. In a nutshell, this cognitive bias can be attributed to aberrant decisional and judgment processes in the context of information integration and evidence evaluation. Trait intuition research, which has observed that an intuitive thinking style is positively associated with schizotypal traits and delusional ideation in healthy adults, may raise the question of whether patients with schizophrenia are “too intuitive” in situations where enough information exists but is ignored, leading to the jumping-to-conclusions bias. Intuition is thereby defined as an unconscious, experience-based, and action-initiating decision strategy. Depending on the situation, it can lead to either biased or correct decision outcomes. However, the ability to use intuition is indispensable for preferential daily-life decision making in order to stay adaptive. Main aim: The planned study aims to examine the temporal relationship between intuitive judgment and decision making and the jumping-to-conclusions bias in daily life (naturalistic level) and with neuroimaging (neurocognitive level). To address this aim, intuition will be explored from a process perspective, which will make it possible to disentangle underlying neurocognitive mechanisms and circumvent the drawbacks of self-report measures that have been typically used when investigating intuition from a trait perspective. Method: There will be two groups of participants (patients, healthy controls), randomly allocated to one of two conditions (intuition first vs. jumping to conclusions first). To assess the relationship between intuition and the jumping-to-conclusions bias on a neurocognitive level, while being scanned with fMRI, participants will perform a classic intuition task that operationalizes intuition via semantic coherence judgments and a probabilistic reasoning task to assess the jumping-to-conclusions bias. The fMRI sessions will be followed by an ecological momentary assessment of intuitive decision making and the jumping-to-conclusions bias in daily life (naturalistic level). Expected outcomes: The jumping-to-conclusions bias is expected to be higher in the patients than in the control group, replicating previous work. A high use of intuition in daily life is expected to predict the jumping-to-conclusions bias in patients with schizophrenia. Neuronal activation patterns accompanying intuition are assumed to be deficient in the patients compared to the healthy group. Relevance of the planned work: The study has the potential for highly relevant scientific and ultimately also clinical implications. On the scientific level, the results will inform and augment (a) existing neuroscientific models on intuition, and (b) prevailing cognitive models on the formation and maintenance of key symptoms in schizophrenia. On the clinical level, in the long term, results may have an impact on the development of nonpharmacological metacognitive training modules addressing daily life decision making.
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