Project

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Single Entities at High Magnification: Mapping, Measuring and Manipulating Nanoparticles

Applicant Momotenko Dmitry
Number 174217
Funding scheme Ambizione
Research institution Laboratory of Biosensors and Bioelectronics Institute for Biomedical Engineering University and ETH Zurich
Institution of higher education ETH Zurich - ETHZ
Main discipline Physical Chemistry
Start/End 01.11.2017 - 31.01.2021
Approved amount 585'018.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Physical Chemistry
Material Sciences

Keywords (6)

nanoparticle; nanopipette; electrocatalysis; scanning probe methods; electrochemistry; nanomanipulation

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
Nanopartikel aus Übergangsmetallen spielen eine wichtige Rolle als Katalysatoren von chemischen Reaktionen, zum Beispiel in Brennstoffzellen für die Umwandlung von chemischer Energie in Elektrizität. Die chemische Aktivität, und damit die Effizienz dieser Katalysatoren, hängt stark von ihrer Struktur ab. Ein besseres Verständnis der Verbindung zwischen der Struktur und der chemischen Reaktivität von Nanopartikeln führt daher zu einer Weiterentwicklung dieser Energieumwandlung. Das Ziel des Projektes ist, durch gezielte Veränderungen von individuellen Nanopartikeln dessen Struktur, Reaktivität und chemische Eigenschaften zu verbessern.
Lay summary

Wissenschaftliche Ansätze 
Nanopipetten werden dazu benutzt, Nanopartikel gezielt zu verändern. Dies beinhaltet die Analyse der physikalischen und chemischen Parameter der Nanopartikel sowie deren Eigenschaften bei der Energieumwandlung. Dazu gehört die detaillierte Charakterisierung der lokalen Temperaturverteilung auf und neben den Nanopartikeln sowie die Beschreibung der temperatur-abhängigen katalytischen Eigenschaften der Nanopartikel.

Kontext
Das Projekt befindet sich auf der Schnittstelle der Ingenieurwissenschaften, der Physik sowie der Chemie. Die wissenschaftlichen Daten durch die Weiterentwicklung der angewendeten Methoden haben daher einen Einfluss auf verschiedene wissenschaftliche Disziplinen. Dies ist besonders wichtig für die Entwicklung neuer Materialien für die Verbesserung der physikalisch-chemischen Eigenschaften von Brennstoffzellen.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 08.11.2017

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Transition metal nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in energy conversion systems, such as fuel cells, which are capable to transform chemical energy into electricity. Understanding the relation between structure and chemical reactivity of NPs is of key importance for the development of more efficient, durable and selective technologies for energy conversion. This project sets out to broaden the scope of methodologies for detailed analysis of chemical properties of NPs by combining manipulation of individual particles with local electrochemical measurements in order to acquire information on particle structure and chemical reactivity.
Lay summary

Aims of the research project at the start of research

This project aims to develop new functional scanning probe microscopy techniques based on nanopipettes (pulled glass capillaries) for manipulation and measurements on a single NP level. Accordingly, the project goals are: i) imaging and controllable manipulation of individual particles and further examination of their physical and chemical characteristics for application as fuel cell catalysts; and ii) probing local temperature distributions around individual NPs and characterization of their catalytic properties depending on temperature.

 

Scientific and societal context of the research project

This project brings together engineering, physical and chemical sciences, which sets up the project to impact in a broad research context. The methodologies that will be developed in this programme will generate novel nanotechnological tools that have the potential to be applied across many research disciplines. Furthermore, the new insights on NPs behavior as fuel cell catalysts will have an impact on the development of new materials with enhanced performance for efficient energy generation and storage.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 08.11.2017

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Force-Controlled Formation of Dynamic Nanopores for Single-Biomolecule Sensing and Single-Cell Secretomics
Schlotter Tilman, Weaver Sean, Forró Csaba, Momotenko Dmitry, Vörös János, Zambelli Tomaso, Aramesh Morteza (2020), Force-Controlled Formation of Dynamic Nanopores for Single-Biomolecule Sensing and Single-Cell Secretomics, in ACS Nano, 14(10), 12993-13003.
Alginate Sulfate Substrates Control Growth Factor Binding and Growth of Primary Neurons: Toward Engineered 3D Neural Networks
Kfoury Georges, El Habbaki Vanessa, Malaeb Waddah, Weaver Sean, Momotenko Dmitry, Mhanna Rami (2020), Alginate Sulfate Substrates Control Growth Factor Binding and Growth of Primary Neurons: Toward Engineered 3D Neural Networks, in Advanced Biosystems, 4(7), 2000047-2000047.
Single-Nanoparticle Thermometry with a Nanopipette
Holub Martin, Adobes-Vidal Maria, Frutiger Andreas, Gschwend Pascal M., Pratsinis Sotiris E., Momotenko Dmitry (2020), Single-Nanoparticle Thermometry with a Nanopipette, in ACS Nano, 14(6), 7358-7369.
Additive Manufacturing of Sub-Micron to Sub-mm Metal Structures with Hollow AFM Cantilevers
Ercolano Giorgio, van Nisselroy Cathelijn, Merle Thibaut, Vörös János, Momotenko Dmitry, Koelmans Wabe, Zambelli Tomaso (2020), Additive Manufacturing of Sub-Micron to Sub-mm Metal Structures with Hollow AFM Cantilevers, in Micromachines, 11(1), 6-6.
Localized detection of ions and biomolecules with a force-controlled scanning nanopore microscope
Aramesh Morteza, Forró Csaba, Dorwling-Carter Livie, Lüchtefeld Ines, Schlotter Tilman, Ihle Stephan J., Shorubalko Ivan, Hosseini Vahid, Momotenko Dmitry, Zambelli Tomaso, Klotzsch Enrico, Vörös János (2019), Localized detection of ions and biomolecules with a force-controlled scanning nanopore microscope, in Nature Nanotechnology, 14(8), 791-798.
Multiscale Additive Manufacturing of Metal Microstructures
Ercolano Giorgio, Zambelli Tomaso, van Nisselroy Cathelijn, Momotenko Dmitry, Vörös Janos, Merle Thibaut, Koelmans Wabe (2019), Multiscale Additive Manufacturing of Metal Microstructures, in Advanced Engineering Materials, 1900961.
Combined Ion Conductance and Atomic Force Microscope for Fast Simultaneous Topographical and Surface Charge Imaging
Dorwling-Carter Livie, Aramesh Morteza, Han Hana, Zambelli Tomaso (2018), Combined Ion Conductance and Atomic Force Microscope for Fast Simultaneous Topographical and Surface Charge Imaging, in Analytical Chemistry, 11453-11460.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Andrei Tolstikov; Institute of Environmental and Agricultural Biology, Tyumen State University Russia (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure
- Exchange of personnel
Dr. Genevieve Lau; Functional Materials for Energy Harvesting, Nanyang Technological University Singapore (Asia)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Ingo Burgert, Dr. Keplinger; Wood Materials Science Group, ETH Zurich Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Nanoparticle Technology Laboratory, ETH Zurich Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
27th International Colloquium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Talk given at a conference Micro- and Nanoscale Electrochemical 3D Printing 05.12.2019 Shuzenji, Japan Momotenko Dmitry;
10th Workshop on SECM: Recent Advances and Applications Talk given at a conference Electrochemical 3D Printing: a Journey from Micro- to Nanoscale 29.09.2019 Paris, France Momotenko Dmitry;
FluidFM User Conference Talk given at a conference Feedback-Controlled Electrochemical 3D Printing 31.01.2019 Zürich, Switzerland Momotenko Dmitry;
AiMES 2018 Talk given at a conference Electrochemical 3D Printing with Nanopipettes 30.09.2018 Cancun, Mexico Momotenko Dmitry;
69th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Electrochemistry Poster Scanning Nanopipette Thermometry 02.09.2018 Bologna, Italy Momotenko Dmitry;
69th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Electrochemistry Poster Fast Simultaneous Topographical and Surface Charge Mapping with Microchanneled Cantilevers 02.09.2018 Bologna, Italy Momotenko Dmitry;


Self-organised

Title Date Place
IBT seminar "Research Topics in Biomedical Engineering" 17.09.2018 Zurich, Switzerland

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
New media (web, blogs, podcasts, news feeds etc.) Honey, I shrunk Michelangelo's David ETH blog International 2019
New media (web, blogs, podcasts, news feeds etc.) Listening to the whispers of individual cells ETH blog International 2019
New media (web, blogs, podcasts, news feeds etc.) Nobel Laureates Mentor The Next Generation Of Young Scientists ETH blog International 2019

Abstract

Current raise in worldwide energy consumption requires development of novel technologies and materials for efficient energy generation and storage. Key performance characteristics of modern nanomaterials for energy applications, such as electrocatalysts for fuel cells, cathodes for lithium-ion batteries and electrodes for solar cells, are determined by the fundamental physicochemical properties of the nanoscale entities (nanoparticles, reaction sites, defects), where chemical events mainly take place. Understanding materials’ behavior at a nanoscale, and at a single entity level, is therefore crucial for the design of the next generations of materials and technologies.This ambitious multidisciplinary project seeks new paradigms for probing, visualizing and manipulating nanoscale objects and particles with the use of positional nanopipettes, with further application of these advanced methodologies to study nanoelectrocatalysts. Nanopipette methods have recently shown their great potential for microscopy and imaging structural and functional properties, such as surface charge and chemical reactivity, with nanoscale resolution and unprecedented imaging rates, which puts them on the leading edge of the current development of scanning probe microscopy instrumentation. Here, significant advances of the current nanopipette techniques are proposed, with the goal to extend the capabilities of present methods and to convert a nanopipette into a powerful platform for manipulation of nanoobjects and for probing spatial distributions of heat. These novel experimental approaches would open up new perspectives on characterization of physicochemical nanoscale properties of single entities and will provide new insights on nanoscale electrocatalysis, presently inaccessible with conventional techniques.The objective of the project is twofold: i) imaging and manipulation of individual particles with sizes varying from a few nanometers (~5 nm) and up to tens of nanometers (depending on application) with nanometer-scale resolution and further examination of their physicochemical characteristics and performance for application as fuel cell catalysts; and ii) probing local temperature distributions in nanoscale environments on individual nanoparticles and assessment of their catalytic properties depending on temperature. In this project, nanoscale nanopipette imaging/manipulation concept will be developed using powerful potential of the scanning ion conductance microscopy. This nanoscale scanning probe technique will be advanced to perform dielectrophoretic and nanofluidic particle manipulation along with thermal imaging for the unique analysis of the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials. Accordingly, the project is structured into three tasks: i) construction of the cutting edge electrochemical imaging platform, ii) development of particle manipulation techniques based on nanopipettes and their applications to study particle-electrode collisions, particle adsorption, real-time monitoring chemical reactions on individual particles, weighting individual particles, study particle dissolution and surface processes, and iii) development of nanoscale thermal imaging technique to investigate the effects of local temperature on performance characteristics of nanoelectrocatalysts.The new methodologies that will develop in this project will be established, tested, modeled and used to study fundamentally and industrially significant interfaces and chemical reactions. Importantly, the project will be conducted in a highly collaborative environment of Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zurich (ETHZ), with the access to facilities of the excellent quality, and will amalgamate complementary expertise of the applicant and the Host Group (Laboratory of Biosensors and Bioelectronics), therefore ensuring the overall success of the research programme. It is further important to emphasize that the methods to be developed and used in this project will subsequently be widely applicable in many areas, spanning physical sciences, materials science, nanotechnology and across other disciplines, ensuring that this project has the potential for major multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary impact in fundamental and applied sciences, and will have wider academic, societal and economic impact.
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