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Ecology and evolution of olfactory signalling in the deceptive pollination of Arum maculatum: mimicry and local adaptation

English title Ecology and evolution of olfactory signalling in the deceptive pollination of Arum maculatum: mimicry and local adaptation
Applicant Alvarez Nadir
Number 163334
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Département d'Ecologie et d'Evolution Faculté de Biologie et de Médecine Université de Lausanne
Institution of higher education University of Lausanne - LA
Main discipline Zoology
Start/End 01.03.2017 - 29.02.2020
Approved amount 351'780.00
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All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Zoology
Ecology
Botany

Keywords (6)

chemical ecology; plant-insect interactions ; ecological speciation; molecular determinants of adaptation; local adaptation; insect pollination

Lay Summary (French)

Lead
Les angiospermes sont principalement pollinisées par des animaux, en particulier par des insectes, avec lesquels elles sont généralement impliquées dans des interactions mutualistes. Cependant, plusieurs lignées de plantes ont développé la capacité d'attirer les pollinisateurs par tromperie.
Lay summary

Ces plantes imitent la présence d'une récompense pour le pollinisateur, en utilisant différents indices sensoriels, en particulier olfactifs ou visuels, mais sans lui fournir de récompense. Ici, nous nous concentrons sur l'interaction entre le genre Arum et ses mouches pollinisatrices. Plus précisément, nous utilisons notre système modèle (depuis plus de dix ans), Arum maculatum, une espèce iconique de nos contrées, qui a développé des stratégies pour piéger temporairement ses pollinisateurs en imitant par signaux olfactifs les sites de ponte spécifiques de deux mouches de la famille des Psychodidae, à savoir Psychoda phalaenoides et Psychoda grisescens. Alors que la première espèce est presque exclusivement prise au piège dans la plupart de la zone de distribution de la plante, la seconde espèce se retrouve principalement dans les inflorescences en Europe du Sud, ainsi que dans certains endroits de la frange atlantique ouest-européenne.

 

Dans ce projet, nous cherchons à identifier d’où proviennent ces différences dans la capacité d’attraction. Sont-elles liées à la disponibilité du pollinisateur, ou à l'adaptation des lignées de plantes au pollinisateur local le plus efficace?

 

Ce projet combine les approches génétique, comportementale et d'écologie chimique afin d'identifier la nature des adaptations locales dans la production des odeurs florales et dans l’attraction du pollinisateur. Plus généralement, notre projet vise à comprendre comment les interactions biotiques conduisent à l'adaptation locale, la différenciation écologique et génétique, et enfin la spéciation, dans les systèmes de pollinisation par tromperie.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 13.12.2016

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Elevational gradients in constitutive and induced oak defences based on individual traits and their correlated expression patterns
GalmánAndrea, Abdala-RobertsLuis, WartalskaPola, CoveloFelisa, RöderGregory, SzenteczkiMark, MoreiraXoaquín, RasmannSergio, Elevational gradients in constitutive and induced oak defences based on individual traits and their correlated expression patterns, in Oikos.
Within-species floral odor variation is maintained by spatial and temporal heterogeneity in pollinator communities
Szenteczki Mark A, Godschalx Adrienne L, Galmán Andrea, Gibernau Marc, Alvarez Nadir, Rasmann Sergio, Within-species floral odor variation is maintained by spatial and temporal heterogeneity in pollinator communities, in biorxiv.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Institute of Biology - FG Limnology, University of Kassel Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure
Laboratory of Fundamental and applied research in chemical ecology, University of Neuchâtel Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure
Laboratory of Environmental Sciences, University of Corsica France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Ecology and Evolution of Flowers Poster Geographic variation in transcript expression and floral volatile production in deceptively pollinated Arum maculatum 24.11.2018 Zurich, Switzerland Godschalx Adrienne; Rasmann Sergio; Szenteczki Mark; Alvarez Nadir;
Ecology and Evolution of Flowers Poster Variation within mimicry: biogeography and pollinator dominance diffuse the poop-mimicking floral scents of Arum maculatum 24.11.2018 Zurich, Switzerland Godschalx Adrienne;
SeeDS Symposium Talk given at a conference Tracking local adaptation in Arum maculatum floral scent 15.11.2018 Neuchâtel, Switzerland Szenteczki Mark;
Biology18 Talk given at a conference Floral volatiles and corresponding transcript expression of brood-site mimic, Arum maculatum, are geographically structured and vary according to the dominant pollinator species 14.02.2018 Neuchâtel, Switzerland Alvarez Nadir; Rasmann Sergio; Szenteczki Mark; Godschalx Adrienne;


Self-organised

Title Date Place
Biology18 14.02.2018 Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
116778 Phylogeography of mutualistic versus antagonistic plant-insect interactions 01.04.2007 Project funding
144870 Consequences of species range contraction on the genetic diversity of cold-adapted organisms 01.03.2013 SNSF Professorships
116778 Phylogeography of mutualistic versus antagonistic plant-insect interactions 01.04.2007 Project funding
183365 Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Tandem Mass Spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS/MS) for metabolomics and identification of bioactive molecules 01.10.2019 R'EQUIP

Abstract

Angiosperms are mainly pollinated by animals, especially insects. They are typically involved in mutualistic interactions with their pollinators, but 4-6 % of flowering plants are pollinated by deceit. They signal the presence of a reward without providing it and floral scents are often the most important signals. Our model system, Arum maculatum, is one of the most fascinating deceptive plants in Europe. It has evolved strategies for temporarily trapping its pollinators and mimics by olfactory means the specific oviposition sites of two psychodid moth flies, Psychoda phalaenoides and Psycha grisescens. Whereas the former is almost exclusively trapped in most of the distribution area of the plant, the latter is predominantly found in inflorescences in southern Europe as well as in some locations of the Atlantic fringe. However, it is yet unknown whether the geographical pollinator pattern reflects the abundance of the pollinators at different locations independently of scent differences, or is an adaptive response of the different Arum populations in order to attract the most abundant and/or efficient local pollinator.With this project we aim (1) to identify the geographical variation of the chemical communication between A. maculatum and psychodid flies, 2) to investigate local adaptations of floral scent production, and 3) to look at the genetic basis of intraspecific variability in floral scent and pollinator attraction. In order to accomplish our goals, ecological data of both plants and pollinators (presence of natural oviposition sites, floral scent variation, pollination efficiencies, insect relative abundances, pollinator preference) will be compared to genetic variation at two different -omics layers (i.e., genome and transcriptome) of plants. The local adaptive values (local specialization) will be tested by performing controlled pollinations, transplanting and choice experiments in order to assess the fitness of local and “immigrant” (chemo)types and/or insects, and the genetic basis of such patterns will be identified. Our project aims to understand how biotic interactions drive local adaptation, ecological and genetic differentiation, and further speciation, in lure-and-trap pollination systems. As only few substantiated studies are available on local adaptation in floral traits, our project represents a strong and novel scientific contribution in this field of research.
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