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Evolution of Cooperation in Hierarchical Societies

Applicant Antonioni Alberto
Number 161864
Funding scheme Early Postdoc.Mobility
Research institution Departamento de Matemáticas Universidad Carlos III de Madrid
Institution of higher education Institution abroad - IACH
Main discipline Economics
Start/End 01.09.2015 - 28.02.2017
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All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Economics
Sociology
Other disciplines of Physics

Keywords (4)

Experimental economics; Group formation; Evolution of cooperation; Human behavior

Lay Summary (Italian)

Lead
L'obiettivo principale di questo progetto di ricerca è di investigare come la cooperazione possa emergere e stabilirsi in società gerarchiche.
Lay summary

A partire da precedenti studi sulla cooperazione condotti da ricercatori nel campo dell'economia e della fisica, con questo progetto vogliamo andare oltre lo studio della cooperazione altruistica e investigare come funzioni la cooperazione in società gerarchiche. Più precisamente, questo progetto vuole svelare come le relazioni sociali, come quelle gerarchiche, influenzino positivamente, o negativamente, l'evoluzione della cooperazione nelle società. Verranno sviluppati dei nuovi modelli di comportamento umano e di formazione di gruppi, concentrandosi sullo studio di fenomeni emergenti dal comportamento dei singoli individui.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 30.05.2015

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Publications

Publication
Parasite spreading in spatial ecological multiplex networks
Stella Massimo, Andreazzi Cecilia S., Selakovic Sanja, Goudarzi Alireza, Antonioni Alberto (2016), Parasite spreading in spatial ecological multiplex networks, in Journal of Complex Networks, cnw028-cnw028.
Cooperation Survives and Cheating Pays in a Dynamic Network Structure with Unreliable Reputation
Antonioni Alberto, Sánchez Angel, Tomassini Marco (2016), Cooperation Survives and Cheating Pays in a Dynamic Network Structure with Unreliable Reputation, in Scientific Reports, 6(1), 27160.
Conformity-driven agents support ordered phases in the spatial public goods game
Javarone Marco Alberto, Antonioni Alberto, Caravelli Francesco (2016), Conformity-driven agents support ordered phases in the spatial public goods game, in EPL (Europhysics Letters), 114(3), 38001-38001.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Winter Workshop on Complex Systems 2017 Talk given at a conference Drunk Game Theory: An individual perception-based framework for evolutionary game theory 10.02.2017 Belgrade, Serbien Antonioni Alberto;
Internal Seminar at Rovira i Virgili University Individual talk The role of costly punishment and unreliable reputation in networked cooperative interactions: experimental evidence 19.10.2016 Tarragona, Spain Antonioni Alberto;
7th ESSA Summer School in Social Simulation (invited talk) Talk given at a conference Evolutionary Games in Networked Populations: Numerical Models and Experiments 29.09.2016 Rome, Italy Antonioni Alberto;
Conference on Complex Systems 2016 Talk given at a conference Cooperation Survives and Cheating Pays in a Dynamic Network Structure with Unreliable Reputation 19.09.2016 Amsterdam, Netherlands Antonioni Alberto;
Complex Networks 2016 Poster Parasite Spreading in Spatial Ecological Multiplex Networks 11.07.2016 Marseille, France Antonioni Alberto;
Internal Seminar at Queen Mary University of London Individual talk The role of costly information and unreliable reputation in networked cooperative interactions: experimental evidence 16.06.2016 London, Great Britain and Northern Ireland Antonioni Alberto;
Workshop on Complex SocioTechnical Systems 2016 Talk given at a conference Cooperation Survives and Cheating Pays in a Dynamic Network Structure with Unreliable Reputation 08.06.2016 Valencia, Spain Antonioni Alberto;
CompleNet 2016 Poster Investigating Peer and Sorting Effects within an Adaptive Multiplex Network Model 23.03.2016 Dijon, France Antonioni Alberto;
Internal Seminar at Northeastern University Individual talk Spatial Cooperation and Coordination Among Humans: Experimental Results 05.11.2015 Boston, United States of America Antonioni Alberto;
Internal Seminar at University of Pennsylvania Individual talk Spatial Cooperation and Coordination Among Humans: Experimental Results 27.10.2015 Philadelphia, United States of America Antonioni Alberto;
Student Conference on Complexity Science 2015 Talk given at a conference Disease Spreading on Ecological Multiplex Networks 09.09.2015 Granada, Spain Antonioni Alberto;
Mediterranean School of Complex Networks 2015 Talk given at a conference Short-range mobility and the evolution of cooperation: an experimental study 03.09.2015 Salina, Italy Antonioni Alberto;


Self-organised

Title Date Place

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
171537 Evolution of Cooperation in Hierarchical Societies II 01.03.2017 Advanced Postdoc.Mobility

Abstract

The main scope of this research project is to combine complex systems science and experimental economics to make a breakthrough in our understanding of the emergence and stability of cooperation in hierarchical societies. Departing from precedent investigations on cooperation carried out by many researchers from the economics and physics community, I want to go beyond mere altruistic cooperation and study how people work together to achieve common goals when they are organized as a hierarchical society. More precisely, this research work aims to understand how social relationships, such as hierarchical ones, function to impede or promote cooperation in human societies, bridging the current gap between studies of human behaviour and theoretical predictions. I thus propose to develop a novel experimental framework in order to extend results obtained investigating cooperative behaviour from a more traditional experimental economics viewpoint, i.e., between anonymous individuals devoid of any social structure.I will investigate how cooperation and human interactions act in hierarchical groups, about which very little is known and where cooperative behaviour might be different. In this project I will design new models of human behaviour and group formation and dynamics, focusing on the study of emergent phenomena arising from the feedback between global features and individual actions. Such an interplay between experiments and modelling, which I have successfully applied in recent research, will lead to experimentally verifiable predictions and will provide firm grounds to address problems such as the origin of the first human societies and management issues in large-scale organizations.
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