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Stress and social economic decision-making: The impact of stress on confidence and other-regarding behavior

English title Stress and social economic decision-making: The impact of stress on confidence and other-regarding behavior
Applicant Sandi Carmen
Number 146431
Funding scheme Interdisciplinary projects
Research institution Laboratoire de Génétique Comportementale EPFL - SV - BMI
Institution of higher education EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Main discipline Physiology : other topics
Start/End 01.04.2013 - 30.06.2016
Approved amount 395'383.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Physiology : other topics
Economics

Keywords (5)

glucocorticoids; stress; confidence judgments; other-regarding behavior; field experiments

Lay Summary (French)

Lead
L'impact du stress
Lay summary

Le stress peut avoir d'importantes conséquences négatives sur l’individu ainsi que sur la société au sens large. Cependant, très peu de littérature scientifique traite l’effet du stress sur le comportement social de l’être humain. Par le présent projet, nous cherchons à élaborer l’effet que porte le stress sur les interactions humaines telles que la coopération, l’altruisme et la réciprocité. Nous allons comparer les différents types de stress que l’on distingue sur plusieurs domaines tels que le stress physique et psychologique, l’intensité du stress, ou encore la chronicité (stress momentané ou perpétuel). Les chercheurs veulent aussi trouver des différences individuelles qui pourraient expliquer comment certaines personnes sont plus sensibles au stress que d’autres, surtout dû aux différences de personnalité.

Des protocoles psychologiques expérimentaux, où les chercheurs créent une condition stressante, ainsi que des études de terrain, où les chercheurs utilisent des situations stressantes déjà existantes, sont proposées. Des pratiques physiologiques et endocrinologues indiqueront l’effet physique du stress, par exemple des analyses d’hormones de stress ou du battement de cœur. Différentes méthodes seront aussi employées pour étudier comment le stress peut influencer le comportement social telles que des questionnaires ou des jeux économiques où les participants auront moyen de garder ou de partager des sommes d’argent réelles.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 27.05.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Glutamine-to-glutamate ratio in the nucleus accumbens predicts effort-based motivated performance in humans
Strasser Alina, Luksys Gediminas, Xin Lijing, Pessiglione Mathias, Gruetter Rolf, Sandi Carmen (2020), Glutamine-to-glutamate ratio in the nucleus accumbens predicts effort-based motivated performance in humans, in Neuropsychopharmacology, 45(12), 2048-2057.
Nucleus accumbens neurochemistry in human anxiety: A 7 T 1H-MRS study
Strasser Alina, Xin Lijing, Gruetter Rolf, Sandi Carmen (2019), Nucleus accumbens neurochemistry in human anxiety: A 7 T 1H-MRS study, in European Neuropsychopharmacology, 29(3), 365-375.
Dominant men are faster in decision-making situations and exhibit a distinct neural signal for promptness
da Cruz Janir, Rodrigues João, Thoresen John C, Chicherov Vitaly, Figueiredo Patrícia, Herzog Michael H, Sandi Carmen (2018), Dominant men are faster in decision-making situations and exhibit a distinct neural signal for promptness, in Cerebral Cortex, 28(10), 3740-3751.
Acute stress alters individual risk taking in a time-dependent manner and leads to anti-social risk
Bendahan S., Goette L., Thoresen J., Loued-Khenissi L., Hollis F., Sandi C. (2017), Acute stress alters individual risk taking in a time-dependent manner and leads to anti-social risk, in European Journal of Neuroscience, 45(7), 877-885.
Not all anxious individuals get lost: Trait anxiety and mental rotation ability interact to explain performance in map-based route learning in men
Thoresen John, FranceletRebecca, Coltekin Arzu, RichterKai-Florian, FabrikantSara I., SandiCarmen (2016), Not all anxious individuals get lost: Trait anxiety and mental rotation ability interact to explain performance in map-based route learning in men, in Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, 132, 1-8.
Stress pulls us apart: anxiety leads to differences in competitive confidence under stress
Goette Lorenz, BendahanSamuel, ThoresenJohn, HollisFiona, SandiCarmen (2015), Stress pulls us apart: anxiety leads to differences in competitive confidence under stress, in Psychoneuroendocrinology, 54, 115-123.

Scientific events



Self-organised

Title Date Place

Awards

Title Year
Nominated President-elect of FENS, 2016. 2016
Elsevier-EBBS Brain Behavior Prize, 2014, that included a Special Lecture at the Federation of European Neurosciences (FENS) Forum in 2014, Milano. 2015

Abstract

Stress is a pervasive phenomenon in modern societies and it can have deep consequences for the lives of individuals and for society as a whole. Stress has been shown to have complex effects on cognitive function in animals and humans, as well as in social behaviors in animals. Yet almost nothing is known about the effect of stress on human social behavior -including social economic decision making- apart from first pioneering explorations (von Dawans et al., 2012) and our pilot project, described in more detail below. We hypothesize that stress affects social economic decision-making behaviors, and we focus here on its effects on confidence judgments and other-regarding behavior. We also hypothesize that stress effects on social behaviors are dependent upon group boundaries. We hypothesize that the factors stress intensity, its nature and duration are essential when defining stress effects in social behaviors. In addition, we hypothesize that stress effects are related to individual differences in gender, in the activation of physiological responses, and/or in personality traits and other structural variables inherent to the subjects.Thus, we aim to achieve a comprehensive understanding of how stress affects social economic decision making; more specifically, interpersonal judgments and other-regarding behavior. We aim to develop an integrative view of stress effects in interpersonal judgments and other-regarding behaviors that reflects stress effects across different factors and dimensions, namely stress intensity, stress nature (physical vs. psychosocial) and duration (acute vs. repeated or chronic). We will address these goals using interdisciplinary methods from physiology, endocrinology and economics, with protocols varying from lab experiments to quasi-randomized field experiments. First, we will develop the necessary stress-induction experimental procedures and subsequently investigate their impact and that of a naturally occurring stress condition (survival training in the Swiss Army) in a selection of social economic games selected and designed for their relevance to measure confidence and other-regarding behavior. Under naturalistic conditions, we will also investigate how group boundaries modulate the impact of stress in social and anti-social behaviors. In parallel, we aim at investigating the role of individual differences (related to gender, personality traits, and hormonal responsiveness) in the impact of stress in the social economic behaviors under study.We expect to obtain key information to better understand how social economic decision-making is influenced by stress. More broadly, our findings will unveil factors and conditions affecting social behaviors in humans that will allow us to identify relevant scenarios to investigate the neurobiological mechanisms translating stress effects in follow up studies. They will also provide guidelines for theoretical modeling in Economics, with potential important consequences in models of optimal management of organizations. Furthermore, our results will provide essential knowledge regarding the impact of different stress factors on behavior and, consequently, a better understanding of how stress can be managed.
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