Project

Back to overview

Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework

English title Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework
Applicant Dlabac Oliver
Number 141461
Funding scheme Fellowships for prospective researchers
Research institution Department of Political Science University of British Columbia
Institution of higher education Institution abroad - IACH
Main discipline Political science
Start/End 01.08.2012 - 31.07.2013
Show all

All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Political science
Legal sciences
Sociology

Keywords (7)

Quality of democracy; Urban governance; Governance-driven democratization; Democratic governance ; City planning; Zurich; Vancouver

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

The proposed research project is concerned with assessing the quality of local democracy, or more precisely with democratic urban governance with regard to city planning. Since existing indices of ‘good’ urban governance fail in giving a differentiated assessment of the democratic quality of urban governance, it is proposed to develop a comparative framework which is able to reasonably compare democratic urban governance of cities coming from different democratic traditions and leaving to different democratic futures. The project proposal delineates a multidimensional framework based on three fundamental values which have been shaping the institutions of local representative government and local direct legislation. It is suggested to evaluate ‘democratic innovations’ or ‘governance-driven democratization’ by their contribution to the democratic dimensions of public accountability and inclusion of all affected. It is argued that the assessment of democratic urban governance must paint a wider picture of democracy by conceiving governance-driven democratization as embedded in the context of a representative government and direct legislation.

The research project is divided into three parts. The first step consists of theoretically conceptualizing and concretizing the comparative framework, the second step envisages case studies for democratic governance in Vancouver and Zurich, representing two opposed traditions of democracy. In the third stage the comparative analysis and aggregated measures of democratic governance for both cities will serve as a first field test for the comparative framework.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
SwissPSA annual congress Talk given at a conference Leading the Inclusive City in Switzerland: Cooperation, Strategy, or Both? 21.01.2016 Basel, Switzerland Dlabac Oliver;
AESOP annual conference Talk given at a conference The democratic foundations of the Just City: Comparing urban planning politics in Lyon and Zurich 13.07.2015 Prague, Czech Republic Dlabac Oliver;
Canadian Political Science Association Annual Conference Talk given at a conference Assessing Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework 04.06.2013 Victoria, Canada Dlabac Oliver;
Midwest Political Science Association Talk given at a conference Assessing Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework 03.04.2013 Chicago, United States of America Dlabac Oliver;
Urban Affairs Association Conference Talk given at a conference Assessing Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework 03.04.2013 San Francisco, United States of America Dlabac Oliver;
Western Political Science Association Annual Meeting Talk given at a conference Assessing Democratic Urban Governance: Towards a Comparative Framework 28.03.2013 Hollywood, United States of America Dlabac Oliver;


Self-organised

Title Date Place

Knowledge transfer events



Self-organised

Title Date Place

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Talks/events/exhibitions Strong Democracies, Smart Cities? Swiss and Canadian Experiences International 30.04.2013

Abstract

The proposed research project is concerned with assessing the quality of local democracy, or more precisely with democratic urban governance with regard to city planning. Since existing indices of ‘good’ urban governance fail in giving a differentiated assessment of the democratic quality of urban governance, it is proposed to develop a comparative framework which is able to reasonably compare democratic urban governance of cities coming from different democratic traditions and leaving to different democratic futures. The project proposal delineates a multidimensional framework based on four fundamental values which have been shaping the institutions of local representative government and local direct legislation. It is suggested to evaluate ‘democratic innovations’ or ‘governance-driven democratization’ by their contribution to the democratic dimensions of public accountability and inclusion of all affected. It is argued that the assessment of democratic urban governance must paint a wider picture of democracy by conceiving governance-driven democratization as embedded in the context of a representative government and direct legislation.The research project is divided into three parts. The first step consists of theoretically conceptualizing and concretizing the comparative framework, the second step envisages case studies for democratic governance in Vancouver and Zurich, representing two opposed traditions of democracy. In the third stage the comparative analysis and aggregated measures of democratic governance for both cities will serve as a first field test for the comparative framework.
-