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Biogenesis and functions of different vacuoles in plants

English title Biogenesis and functions of different vacuoles in plants
Applicant Neuhaus Jean-Marc
Number 141257
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Lab. de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire Institut de Biologie Université de Neuchâtel
Institution of higher education University of Neuchatel - NE
Main discipline Botany
Start/End 01.06.2012 - 31.05.2017
Approved amount 276'340.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Botany
Cellular Biology, Cytology

Keywords (7)

physcomitrella patens; gene knock-out; fluorescence markers; sorting receptor; vacuoles; complementation; Arabidopsis thaliana

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

The vacuolar system of plants is a key element of plant growth and development and fulfills many other functions. Plant cells can have two different vacuoles, requiring different sorting systems, with different signals, receptors, transport vesicles, etc.

The vacuolar systems of higher plants have evolved from simpler ancestors, which might have been preserved in lower plants. This evolution is reflected in the gene families involved in vacuole biogenesis.

We intend to clarify the role of members of two receptor families in targeting to different vacuoles but we will focus mainly on the RMR family, the role of which is currently disputed. Some results point to a direct role as receptor, while other results suggest a more basic role  in all pathways to the vacuoles.

We will continue to develop the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model system for studies of the secretory pathway in plants, taking advantages of the exceptional genetic tools available, in particular the possibilities of targeted gene knock-outs (even multiple), of gene replacement and targeted mutagenesis.

We will thus be able to compare the two very different types of land plants, to determine which elements of the plant specific aspects of the secretory pathway date back to the conquest of land by plants and which may have developed because of the increasing tissue specialization, particularly in flowering plants.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Receptor-mediated sorting of soluble vacuolar proteins: myths, facts, and a new model.
Robinson David G, Neuhaus Jean-Marc (2016), Receptor-mediated sorting of soluble vacuolar proteins: myths, facts, and a new model., in Journal of experimental botany, 67(15), 4435-49.
Dimerization of the Vacuolar Receptors AtRMR1 and -2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Contributes to Their Localization in the trans-Golgi Network
Occhialini Alessandro, Gouzerh Guillaume, Di Sansebastiano Gian Pietro, Neuhaus Jean-Marc (2016), Dimerization of the Vacuolar Receptors AtRMR1 and -2 from Arabidopsis thaliana Contributes to Their Localization in the trans-Golgi Network, in International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 17(10), 1661-1681.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Nikko Geldner, University of Lausanne Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
David G. Robinson, University of Heidelberg Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Liwen Jiang, Chinese University Hong Kong Hongkong (Asia)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
iMoss 2017 Poster Functions of RMR proteins in the moss secretory pathway 28.06.2017 Honolulu, United States of America Fahr Noémie; Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
Plant Biology 2017 Poster Functions of RMR proteins in the moss secretory pathway: sorting receptors and ubiquitin ligases ? 24.06.2017 Honolulu, United States of America Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
ENPER 2016 Poster Functions of RMR proteins in the moss secretory pathway 30.08.2016 Bordeaux, France Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
Swissplant 2016 Talk given at a conference RMR function in moss: reluctant vacuolar receptors 25.01.2016 Les Diablerets, Switzerland Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
Moss 2015 Talk given at a conference RMR function in moss: reluctant vacuolar receptors 30.11.2015 Cancun, Mexico Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
ENPER 2015 Poster Functions of RMR proteins in intracellular trafficking in plants 17.08.2015 Leeds, Great Britain and Northern Ireland Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
Swissplant 2015 Poster Functional characterization of the putative vacuolar receptors RMR in the moss Physcomitrella patens 28.01.2015 Leukerbad, Switzerland Schaefer Didier; Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
ENPER 2014 Poster Functional characterization of the putative vacuolar receptors, the RMR proteins 08.09.2014 Lecce, Italy Fahr Noémie; Neuhaus Jean-Marc;
ENPER 2013 Talk given at a conference Involvement of RMR receptors in the moss Physcomitrella patens 27.08.2013 Gent, Belgium Neuhaus Jean-Marc; Fahr Noémie;
Moss 2013 Poster Involvement of ubiquitin and RMR receptors in vacuolar targeting in plants 17.06.2013 Prague, Czech Republic Neuhaus Jean-Marc; Fahr Noémie;
Swissplant 2013 Poster Involvement of RMR receptors in the moss Physcomitrella patens 30.01.2013 Meiringen, Switzerland Neuhaus Jean-Marc;


Self-organised

Title Date Place
Swissplant 2016 25.01.2016 Les Diablerets, Switzerland

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
113789 Biogenesis and functions of different vacuoles in plants 01.01.2007 Project funding

Abstract

The vacuolar system of plants is a key element of plant growth and development and fulfills many other functions. Plant cells can have two different vacuoles, requiring different sorting systems, with different signals, receptors, transport vesicles, etc. The vacuolar systems of higher plants have evolved from simpler ancestors, which might have been preserved in lower plants. This evolution is reflected in the gene families involved in vacuole biogenesis. Analysis of knock-out or silencing mutants and their complementation will allow to understand the and the capacity of higher plants to adapt to their environment.We intend to clarify the role of members of two receptor families in targeting to different vacuoles and we will focus mainly on the RMR family, the role of which is currently disputed. Some results point to a direct role as receptor, while other results suggest a more basic role in all pathways to the vacuoles.We will develop a new mutant screen for genes implicated in vacuolar trafficking, with an emphasis on the root tissues of higher plants.We will continue to develop the moss Physcomitrella patens as a model system for studies of the secretory pathway in plants, taking advantages of the exceptional genetic tools available, in particular the possibilities of targeted gene knock-outs (even multiple), of gene replacement and targeted mutagenesis. We will thus be able to compare the two very different types of land plants, to determine which elements of the plant specific aspects of the secretory pathway date back to the conquest of land by plants and which may have developed because of the increasing tissue specialization, particularly in flowering plants.
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