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Modulation of fructose's metabolic effects by environmental factors

English title Modulation of fructose's metabolic effects by environmental factors
Applicant Tappy Luc
Number 138428
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Institute of Sport Science and DSB Department of Biomedical Science Université de Lausanne
Institution of higher education University of Lausanne - LA
Main discipline Nutritional Research, Vitaminology
Start/End 01.10.2011 - 30.09.2014
Approved amount 354'000.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Nutritional Research, Vitaminology
Physiology : other topics

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

There is ample evidence, both in humans and in animal models, that a high sugar intake can cause obesity, dyslipidemia, hepatic and extrahepatic insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. These deleterious effects of a high sugar intake have been shown to be more specifically due to the fructose component of sugars. Little is known regarding whether the effects of fructose can be modulated by other environmental factors, however. Here, we hypothesize that the effects of fructose depends tightly on the environment. We specifically hypothesize 1) that exercise protects against the deleterious effects of high fructose intake, 2) that fructose will exert more detrimental effects when it is consumed together with a diet high in carbohydrate from refined carbohydrates, and that a diet rich in unrefined cereals and whole grains will exert a protective effects, and 3) that a moderate fructose intake, which would not produce adverse effects of its own, has deleterious effects when consumed together with another well known hepatotoxin, alcohol. To evaluate these hypotheses, we plan to perform 3 proof-of-concept studies in healthy volunteers. In one of these studies, we will test the short term effects of a high fructose intake with and without exercise on various metabolic markers. In the second study, we will test the short term effects of a high carbohydrate diet from either refined cereals or whole grain on fructose-induced lipid synthesis. In the third study, we will test the acute and short term ( 7 days) effects of fructose alone, alcohol alone, or fructose + alcohol on markers of metabolic disorders and of liver damage. The results of these studies are expected to demonstrate the concept that the adverse effects of fructose can indeed be reduced or enhanced by other environmental factors, and to identify the mechanisms involved in fructose-environment interactions

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Misconceptions about fructose-containing sugars and their role in the obesity epidemic
V. J. van Buul L. Tappy F. J. Brouns (2014), Misconceptions about fructose-containing sugars and their role in the obesity epidemic, in Nutr Res Rev , 27, (119), 119-130.
Coffee consumption attenuates short-term fructose-induced liver insulin resistance in healthy men
Lecoultre V. Carrel G. Egli L. Binnert C. Boss A. MacMillan E.L. Kreis R. Boesch C. (2014), Coffee consumption attenuates short-term fructose-induced liver insulin resistance in healthy men, in Am J Clin Nutr 99:268-275, 99, 268-275.
Dietary sugars and health
Goran. Michael (ed.) (2014), Dietary sugars and health, CRC Press, New- York.
Effects of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners on resting energy expenditure and energy efficiency: a review of human trials
Tappy L. Egli L. Lecoultre V. and Schneider P (2014), Effects of fructose-containing caloric sweeteners on resting energy expenditure and energy efficiency: a review of human trials, in Nutr Metab (Lond) , 10, 54.
Effects of supplementation with essential amino acids on intrahepatic lipid concentrations during fructose overfeeding in humans
Theytaz F. Noguchi Y. Egli L. Campos V. Buehler T. Hodson L. Patterson B.W. Nishikata (2014), Effects of supplementation with essential amino acids on intrahepatic lipid concentrations during fructose overfeeding in humans, in Am J Clin Nutr 96:1008-1016., 96, 1008-1016.
Fructose-induced hyperuricemia is associated with a decreased renal uric acid excretion in humans.
Lecoultre V. Egli L. Theytaz F. Despland C. Schneiter P. and Tappy L. (2014), Fructose-induced hyperuricemia is associated with a decreased renal uric acid excretion in humans., in Diabetes Care, 36, e149-e150.
Metabolic fate of fructose ingested with and without glucose in a mixed meal. Nutrients
Theytaz F. de Giorgi S. Hodson L. Stefanoni N. Rey V. Schneiter P. Giusti V. and Tappy (2014), Metabolic fate of fructose ingested with and without glucose in a mixed meal. Nutrients, in Nutrients, 6:2632-2649, 2631-2649.
Exercise prevents fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia in healthy young subjects
Egli L. Lecoultre V. Theytaz F. Campos V. Hodson L. Schneiter P. Mittendorfer B. Patte (2013), Exercise prevents fructose-induced hypertriglyceridemia in healthy young subjects, in Diabetes, 62, 2259-2265.
Effects of fructose and glucose overfeeding on hepatic insulin sensitivity and intrahepatic lipids in healthy humans
Lecoultre V. Egli L. Carrel G. Theytaz F. Kreis R. Schneiter P. Boss A. Zwygart K. L (2013), Effects of fructose and glucose overfeeding on hepatic insulin sensitivity and intrahepatic lipids in healthy humans, in Obesity (Silver Spring) , 21, 782-785.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
UMR INSERM 1060 / Université Lyon 1/ INRA 1235/ INSA de Lyon (Dr H Vidal) France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Washington University, St Louis, Missuri United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Agroscope Liebfeld Posieux Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
ESPEN meeting, Geneva, 2014 Talk given at a conference Fructose and the metabolic syndrome: lost in translation 05.09.2014 geneva, Switzerland Tappy Luc;
The Sugar Reduction Summit Individual talk Evidence that fructose calories are not more harmful than calories from other substrate 09.07.2014 London, Great Britain and Northern Ireland Tappy Luc;
International Congress of Nutrition Talk given at a conference xxxx 19.09.2013 Grenada, Spain Tappy Luc;
Clinical Research Strategies for fructose metabolism Talk given at a conference Fructose, obesity and weight gain 13.11.2012 Washington DC, United States of America Tappy Luc;


Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Talks/events/exhibitions Benefiq 2014. Rendez vous international sur les ingédients santé International 2014
Media relations: print media, online media Doit-on arrêter de manger du sucre? - Le Temps le temps International 2014
Media relations: print media, online media Is sugar a toxin? Experts debate the role of fructose in our obesity epidemic Washington post International 2014
Talks/events/exhibitions Nutrition and Health Seminar, Dublin International 2014
Media relations: print media, online media Role sugar plays in obesity remains to be seen, claims expert Irish examiner International 2014
Media relations: print media, online media Faut-il bannir le sucre Ca m'intéresse Western Switzerland International 2013

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
132935 Multi-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) on a clinical whole-body MR-system: insulin resistance, ageing, and physical activity 01.12.2010 Project funding
121995 Metabolic effects of dietary proteins in insulin resistance 01.10.2008 Project funding
152331 Interactions between stress and dietary fructose in the development of the metabolic syndrome: role of glucocorticoids 01.04.2014 SCOPES
156167 Role of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in metabolic and brain responses to sucrose overfeeding 01.10.2014 Project funding
149779 Multi-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and imaging (MRI) on a clinical whole-body MR-system: Lipid organelles and mitochondria 01.12.2013 Project funding
135782 Effects of a reduction in sweetened beverage consumption on cardio-metabolic risk factors and food intake in overweight subjects 01.09.2011 Project funding

Abstract

There is ample evidence, both in humans and in animal models, that a high sugar intake can cause obesity, dyslipidemia, hepatic and extrahepatic insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. These deleterious effects have been shown to be specifically due to the fructose component of sugars. Little is known regarding whether the effects of fructose can be modulated by other environmental factors, however. Here, we hypothesize that the effects of fructose depend tightly on the environment. We specifically hypothesize 1) that exercise protects against the deleterious effects of high fructose intake, 2) that fructose will exert more detrimental effects when it is consumed together with a diet high in carbohydrate from refined carbohydrates, and that a diet rich in unrefined cereals and whole grains will exert a protective effects, and 3) that a moderate fructose intake, which would not produce adverse effects of its own, has deleterious effects when consumed together with another well known hepatotoxin, alcohol. To evaluate these hypotheses, we plan to perform 3 proof-of-concept studies in healthy volunteers. In one of these studies, we will test the short term effects of a high fructose intake with and without exercise on various metabolic markers. In the second study, we will test the short term effects of a high carbohydrate diet from either refined cereals or whole grain on fructose-induced lipid synthesis. In the third study, we will test the acute and short term ( 7 days) effects of fructose alone, alcohol alone, or fructose + alcohol on markers of metabolic disorders and of liver damage. The results of these studies are expected to demonstrate the concept that the adverse effects of fructose can indeed be reduced or enhanced by other environmental factors, and to identify the mechanisms involved in fructose-environment interactions
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