Project

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Designing Interactions across Interfaces in Ionic Liquids

Applicant Borkovec Michal
Number 136191
Funding scheme Sinergia
Research institution Département de Chimie Minérale et Analytique Université de Genève
Institution of higher education University of Geneva - GE
Main discipline Physical Chemistry
Start/End 01.01.2012 - 31.12.2015
Approved amount 1'129'500.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Physical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry

Keywords (5)

surface forces ; particle aggreation; tribology; wetting; ionic liquids

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

Ionic liquids (ILs) are similar to molten salts. While ordinary salts melt at elevated temperatures only, ILs are liquid already a room temperature. Since about a decade, ILs are evolving into popular alternative solvents in chemical synthesis, separation processes, and for the development of novel materials. While many of these applications rely on interaction forces between interfaces across ILs, little is known concerning the molecular origin of these forces. The present collaborative project tackles this topic, and proposes to find ways to control and modify such forces systematically. This aim will be achieved by surface functionalization in Dyson’s group (EPFL) and direct measurements of surface forces with the atomic force microscope. These fundamental studies will lead to applications in material sciences, namely nanoparticle stability, lubrication and wetting. Borkovec’s group (University of Geneva) will pursue interaction forces between particles and study the corresponding suspension stability. Spencer’s group (ETHZ) will combine force measurements with tribological and frictional studies and use this knowledge to design novel lubricants. Ralston’s group (Ian Wark Research Institute, Australia) will study forces across fluid-IL-solid interfaces, which are important for the development of novel actuators and sensors. The applications pursued within this project are likely to be of industrial relevance.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Manfred Heuberger, EMPA Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Antonella Rossi, ETHZ Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Thomas Buergi, University of Geneva Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Christophe Labbez, Université de Bourgogne France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Suzanne Jarvis, University College Dublin Ireland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Siegfried Dietrich, Max-Planck Institute of Metals Research Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Rosa Espinosa-Marzal, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Exchange of personnel

Awards

Title Year
Staudinger-Durrer Prize 2012

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
126053 Single-molecule mechanics of dendronized polymers 01.03.2010 NRP 62 Smart Materials
119762 Functionalised ionic liquids for catalysis and other applications 01.04.2008 Project funding
124383 Interactions between Charged Surfaces Triggered by Multivalent Ions 01.06.2009 Project funding
150631 Direct force measurements with combined total internal reflection and atomic force microscopy 01.12.2013 R'EQUIP
140327 Tuning Interactions between Dissimilar Surfaces by Polyelectrolytes 01.06.2012 Project funding
124405 Understanding the role of sugar and glycan structure in natural lubrication mechanisms 01.04.2009 Project funding
159874 Polyelectrolytes near like-charged substrates in the presence of multivalent ions 01.06.2015 Project funding

Abstract

Ionic liquids (ILs) are rapidly developing into a popular class of alternative solvents for numerous applications in chemistry and materials science. While many of these applications rely on interactions between interfaces across ILs, little is known concerning their molecular origin. The present collaborative project tackles this topic, and proposes to find ways to control and modify such forces systematically. This aim will be achieved by direct-force measurements, whereby the influence of IL and surface properties will be investigated. The unique aspect of this collaboration is that the respective functionalization techniques for these surfaces will be developed within the project in Dyson’s group (EPFL) and therefore it will be possible to tune the surface properties systematically. These fundamental studies address material science applications, namely nanoparticle stability, lubrication and wetting. Borkovec’s group (Univ. Geneva) will pursue interaction forces between particles and study the corresponding aggregation rates. These results will provide rational means to control nanoparticle stability in IL. Spencer’s group (ETHZ) will combine such force measurements with tribological and frictional studies and use this knowledge to design novel lubricants. Ralston’s group (Ian Wark Research Institute, Australia) will study forces across fluid-IL-solid interfaces and devise a mechanistic, molecular level picture of dynamic wetting phenomena in ILs. Controlling dynamic wetting properties and contact line friction in ILs is important for the development of novel actuators and sensors. This project will clarify the interaction mechanisms between interfaces across ILs and suggest approaches to their control. The applications pursued within this project are likely to be of industrial relevance, and are expected to result in industrial collaborations (e.g., BASF, BP, Lonza, Rolex, Swatch).
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