Project

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The Use of Biofeedback For a Human-Centred Approach to Improving Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Applicant Jhooti Permjit
Number 130672
Funding scheme Interdisciplinary projects
Research institution Abt. Radiologische Physik Universitätsspital Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Cardiovascular Research
Start/End 01.04.2010 - 31.03.2012
Approved amount 167'005.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Cardiovascular Research
Arts

Keywords (12)

biofeedback; MRI; interface; cardiac; respiration; artefact; experiment; design; game; navigation; psychophysiololgy; human-computer interaction

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
The goal of this research project is to develop a human-centred approach to improving Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI) in terms of: faster scan times for improved patient comfort and throughput; better image quality for more accurate diagnosis; greater understanding of patient state for enhanced patient-operator interactions. Respiration is a major problem in cMRI, leading to increased examination times and poor diagnostic image quality. Whilst early attempts have been made with biofeedback, these were very basic in their approach due to technical limitations. Such techniques were therefore not human-centred and introduced additional unforeseen problems, such as unnatural movements brought on by the biofeedback and the additional high level of patient compliance required. The development of intelligent algorithms and improved technical hardware and imaging sequences enables truly user-centred approaches to now be developed.The project will focus on two medical applications which are significantly affected by the respiratory pattern of a patient: applications which require stable respiratory position at end-expiration and end-inspiration; applications which require stable breath-holding position. A series of respiratory biofeedback modules will be developed, using a variety of audio-visual multi-media techniques, to guide and influence the breathing of a patient in a beneficial way for the imaging procedures.Early biofeedback approaches have used very primitive visual interfaces.Collaboration with IDK will enable more complex and user-friendly interfaces to be developed, with the secondary aim of enhancing the patient experience in the scanner as well as improving the interaction between the scan operator and the patient. Any enhancements in patient comfort will as well contribute to a reduced level of patient anxiety, one of the biggest causes of early scan terminations and failed studies.The requirements and experiences of the operator and the patient are important factors which have been previously lacking in other approaches.Early experiments have been carried out and the results demonstrate that a human-centred approach to tackling the problem of respiration can have significant impacts on the issues relating to examination times and image quality whilst also offering the potential for improving the human-experience and, therefore, reducing problems related to this.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
MR-imaging of the thoracic aorta: 3D-ECG- and respiratory-gated bSSFP imaging using the CLAWS algorithm versus contrast-enhanced 3D-MRA
Kawel Nadine, Jhooti Permi, Haas Tanja, Winter Leopold, Zellweger M, Buser Peter, Keegan Jenny, Scheffler Klaus, Bremerich Jens (2012), MR-imaging of the thoracic aorta: 3D-ECG- and respiratory-gated bSSFP imaging using the CLAWS algorithm versus contrast-enhanced 3D-MRA, in European Journal of Radiology, 81, 239-243.
Use of respiratory biofeedback and CLAWS for increased navigator efficiency for imaging the thoracic aorta
Jhooti Permi, Haas Tanja, Kawel Nadine, Bremerich Jens, Keegan Jenny, Scheffler Klaus (2011), Use of respiratory biofeedback and CLAWS for increased navigator efficiency for imaging the thoracic aorta, in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 66(6), 1666-1673.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
oint Annual Meeting ISMRM-ESMRMB 2010 01.05.2010 Stockholm, Sweden


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
101157 Living-Room 01.01.2003 DORE project funding
107607 living-room 2 01.04.2005 DORE project funding

Abstract

The goal of this research project is to develop a human-centred approach to improving Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI) in terms of: faster scan times for improved patient comfort and throughput; better image quality for more accurate diagnosis; greater understanding of patient state for enhanced patient-operator interactions. Focus will be on the development and analysis of audiovisual interactive stimulus modules which will be applied to relevant medical applications in cMRI. Respiration is a major problem in cMRI, leading to increased examination times and poor diagnostic image quality. Whilst early attempts have been made with biofeedback, these were very basic in their approach due to technical limitations. Such techniques were therefore not human-centred and introduced additional unforeseen problems, such as unnatural movements brought on by the biofeedback and the additional high level of patient compliance required. The development of intelligent algorithms and improved technical hardware and imaging sequences enables truly user-centred approaches to now be developed. The project will focus on two medical applications which are significantly affected by the respiratory pattern of a patient: applications which require stable respiratory position at end-expiration and end-inspiration; applications which require stable breath-holding position. A series of respiratory biofeedback modules will be developed, using a variety of audio-visual multi-media techniques, to guide and influence the breathing of a patient in a beneficial way for the imaging procedures.As competitors use less complex algorithms, they may be able to use similar biofeedback approaches but will be limited in their ability to be truly adaptable to the individual patient, therefore again being vulnerable to the problems encountered with the early biofeedback techniques.Eearly biofeedback approaches have used very primitive visual interfaces. Collaboration with IDK, involving specialists in Design Research, New Media Art and HCI, will enable more complex and user-friendly interfaces to be developed, with the secondary aim of enhancing the patient experience in the scanner as well as improving the interaction between the scan operator and the patient. Any enhancements in patient comfort will as well contribute to a reduced level of patient anxiety, one of the biggest causes of early scan terminations and failed studies (Mackenzie et al 1995). The requirements and experiences of the operator and the patient are important factors which have been previously lacking in other approaches.Early experiments have been carried out and the results demonstrate that a human-centred approach to tackling the problem of respiration can have significant impacts on the issues relating to examination times and image quality whilst also offering the potential for improving the human-experience and, therefore, reducing problems related to this. The project is divided into two one-year studies which are focussed on the development and evaluation of Medical Application Modules (MAM, see project plan). After each year a set of 3-5 fully functional Audiovisual Stimulus Modules (ASM) will be developed and be applicable for each Medical Application. The most appropriate will be fully evaluated in an MRI setting to enable comparison with and without the use of biofeedback. After each year the results will be published as discipline specific scientific papers and presented at appropriate conferences.
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