Project

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Implantable Bio-Electronics for Wireless and High-Resolution Monitoring of Epilepsy in-vivo

Applicant Schmid Alexandre
Number 130166
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Laboratoire de systèmes microélectroniques EPFL - STI - IEL - LSM
Institution of higher education EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Main discipline Microelectronics. Optoelectronics
Start/End 01.12.2010 - 30.11.2013
Approved amount 492'370.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Microelectronics. Optoelectronics
Biomedical Engineering

Keywords (3)

Bio-electronic interfaces; Cortical microelectronic implants; Wireless cortical implants

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Neuroscientists and researchers need increasingly sophisticated and advanced scientific solutions to monitor and study the activity of neural cells and brain tissue in-vivo, in order to assist patients suffering from degenerative brain diseases, to elucidate the effects of various drugs on neurons and brain tissue under a wide variety of conditions, as well as to devise novel interfaces and techniques to enable amputees control electromechanical prostheses. Neurosurgeons currently implant patients suffering from epilepsy to detect the area under seizure, and study the electrical activity of the brain during the epileptic episode. Commercial macro-electrodes are commercially available, which are connected to monitoring equipment by the means of bundles of wires running through the skull and scalp. The patient must remain in a confined clinical environment for several days. His/her comfort is degraded due to the necessary connectivity, which also causes a significant infection hazard. Within the context of handling and studying cortical epilepsy signals, this project proposes the exploration and the development of novel methods and tools under the stringent constraint of improving current state-of-the art, and developing new technology, supported by a strong theoretical background:· integrated implantable system enabling continuous monitoring over long periods of several weeks, typically;· wireless communication of data for increasing patients autonomy and comfort, while decreasing infectious hazard;· high-density active microelectrodes enabling accurate monitoring of the electrical activity of the brain with improved spatial and electrical resolution; several high-density electrode arrays must be placed in various locations, on the surface of the cortex;· two-dimensional, flat active electrodes which do not cause any damage or scare in the surface layers of the cortex.This research aims at gathering all aforementioned theoretical, technology developments into the development of a system enabling acquiring the electrical activity of selected cortical areas, wireless operation including bidirectional communication, and power transmission.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
A low-power area-efficient compressive sensing approach for multi-channel neural recording
Shoaran M., Lopez M.M., Pasupureddi V.S.R., Leblebici Y., Schmid A. (2013), A low-power area-efficient compressive sensing approach for multi-channel neural recording, in ISCAS 2013, IEEE, Shanghai.
Capacitive detuning optimization for wireless uplink communication in neural implants
Yilmaz G., Dehollain C. (2013), Capacitive detuning optimization for wireless uplink communication in neural implants, in IWASI 2013, -, -.
Compressive multichannel cortical signal recording
Kamal M.H., Shoaran M., Leblebici Y., Schmid A., Vandergheynst P. (2013), Compressive multichannel cortical signal recording, in ICASSP 2013, IEEE, -.
Wireless data and power transmission aiming intracranial epilepsy monitoring
Yilmaz G, Atasoy O, Dehollain C. (2013), Wireless data and power transmission aiming intracranial epilepsy monitoring, Proc. SPIE 8765, Bio-MEMS and Medical Microdevices, 87650D, Grenoble, FR.
Wireless Energy and Data Transfer for In-Vivo Epileptic Focus Localization
Yilmaz G., Atasoy O., Dehollain C. (2013), Wireless Energy and Data Transfer for In-Vivo Epileptic Focus Localization, in Sensors Journal, IEEE, 13(11), 4172-4179.
Wireless energy and data transfer for neural recording and stimulation applications
Yilmaz G., Dehollain C. (2013), Wireless energy and data transfer for neural recording and stimulation applications, in PRIME 2013, IEEE, -.
A Wireless Power Link for Neural Recording Systems
Gurkan Yilmaz (2012), A Wireless Power Link for Neural Recording Systems, in PRIME 2012, -, -.
Design Techniques and Analysis of High-Resolution Neural Recording Systems Targeting Epilepsy Focus Localization
Mahsa Shoaran (2012), Design Techniques and Analysis of High-Resolution Neural Recording Systems Targeting Epilepsy Focus Localization, in EMBC 2012, -, -.
The Future of Intracranial EEG Recording in Epilepsy: a Technological Issue ?
Claudio Pollo (2012), The Future of Intracranial EEG Recording in Epilepsy: a Technological Issue ?, in Epileptologie, 29, 114.
An Efficient Wireless Power Link for Implanted Biomedical Devices via Resonant Inductive Coupling
Gurkan Yilmaz, Catherine Dehollain, An Efficient Wireless Power Link for Implanted Biomedical Devices via Resonant Inductive Coupling, in Radio and Wireless Symposium, IEEE Radio Wireless Week 2012, USA.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
SPIE Microtechnologies, Conference 8765, Bio-MEMS and Medical Microdevices, Grenoble, FR, April 25, 2013 Talk given at a conference Low-power techniques in multi-channel cortical recording implants 25.04.2013 Grenoble, France Schmid Alexandre;


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
149742 Implantable Bio-Electronics for Wireless and High-Resolution Monitoring of Epilepsy in-vivo, Part II 01.12.2013 Project funding

Abstract

Neuroscientists and researchers need increasingly sophisticated and advanced scientific solutions to monitor and study the activity of neural cells and brain tissue in-vivo, in order to assist patients suffering from degenerative brain diseases, to elucidate the effects of various drugs on neurons and brain tissue under a wide variety of conditions, as well as to devise novel interfaces and techniques to enable amputees control electromechanical prostheses. Neurosurgeons currently implant patients suffering from epilepsy to detect the area under seizure, and study the electrical activity of the brain during the epileptic episode. Commercial macro-electrodes are commercially available, which are connected to monitoring equipment by the means of bundles of wires running through the skull and scalp. The patient must remain in a confined clinical environment for several days. His/her comfort is degraded due to the necessary connectivity, which also causes a significant infection hazard. Within the context of handling and studying cortical epilepsy signals, this project proposes the exploration and the development of novel methods and tools under the stringent constraint of improving current state-of-the art, and developing new technology, supported by a strong theoretical background:·integrated implantable system enabling continuous monitoring over long periods of several weeks, typically;·wireless communication of data for increasing patients autonomy and comfort, while decreasing infectious hazard;·high-density active microelectrodes enabling accurate monitoring of the electrical activity of the brain with improved spatial and electrical resolution; several high-density electrode arrays must be placed in various locations, on the surface of the cortex;·two-dimensional, flat active electrodes which do not cause any damage or scare in the surface layers of the cortex.This research aims at gathering all aforementioned theoretical, technology developments into the development of a system enabling acquiring the electrical activity of selected cortical areas, wireless operation including bidirectional communication, and power transmission.The research has been partitioned in a number of systematic steps in order to mitigate the scientific risk related to the final steps of the project, where the actual system is operated. Several novel developments and technologies will result along the course of the project, in a predictable manner. This research is intended as part one of a longer-term research, where the scientific focus will shift from technological developments to clinical methodologies.
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