Project

Back to overview

SWISS HOUSEHOLD PANEL - 2010 - 2011

Applicant Wernli Boris
Number 128924
Funding scheme Research Infrastructure
Research institution Fondation FORS Bâtiment Geopolis Université de Lausanne
Institution of higher education Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences - FORS
Main discipline Sociology
Start/End 01.01.2010 - 31.12.2011
Approved amount 4'296'139.00
Show all

All Disciplines (11)

Discipline
Sociology
Education and learning sciences, subject-specific education
Social geography and ecology
Communication sciences
Ethnology
Economics
Social work
Psychology
Political science
Medico-Social Problems of Youth
Medico-Social Problems of the Elderly

Keywords (3)

household panel; longitudinal study; social sciences

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
LeadThe Swiss Household Panel (SHP) is a longitudinal study launched in 1999, set up to observe social change. AimThe principal aim of the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), a longitudinal study launched in 1999, is to observe social change. In particular, it follows the dynamics of changing living conditions and representations in the population of Switzerland. By observing the same individuals over the course of time it allows not only to study the change in numbers (net change) but also the flow of movements between the various states of being (gross change). Moreover, the SHP is a comprehensive survey covering a broad range of social fields and a variety of topics and all members of the households in the panel aged 14 years and over are questioned.SignificanceAn overview of the present and future Swiss social sciences survey landscape shows that the SHP has a special place in the Swiss survey landscape, being the unique longitudinal study offering data to analyse micro social change on the mid to long term and on a comprehensive basis. Other longitudinal surveys either offer a smaller range of topics, follow a restricted subgroup, or allow only the study of short term transitions. As of June 2009, the research network "Living in Switzerland" counts some 570 registered members, who analyse the SHP data on a very large variety of topics (1052 were mentioned). The domains range over life-course analysis, health, poverty, living conditions of elderly people or immigrants, political participation and life satisfaction, etc.MethodologyThe survey is composed of two stratified samples of private households whose members represent the non-institutional resident population in Switzerland. They were drawn randomly in 1999 (SHP_I) and in 2004 (SHP_II), and are interviewed annually from September to February in the three main official national languages using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI).Future prospects and activities 2010-2011 During the next funding period (2010-2011), we plan to conduct development work in three main areas, i.e. (1) communication and incentives; (2) weighting schemes, and (3) questionnaires, mainly to (1) fight attrition, and (2) improve the analytical potential of the SHP for the scientific community. During the same period, we will, moreover, (a) implement a (secure) system of internet dissemination of data and documentation, and (b) take decisions regarding a potential new sample for the next funding period (2012-2013).
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
End of the Conjugal Relationship, Gender and Domestic Tasks in Switzerland
Wernli Boris, Henchoz Caroline (2011), End of the Conjugal Relationship, Gender and Domestic Tasks in Switzerland, in Population (English Edition), 66(3-4), 637-662.
Local cohesion and radical right support: The case of the Swiss People's Party
Fitzgerald Jennifer, Duncan Lawrence (2011), Local cohesion and radical right support: The case of the Swiss People's Party, in Electoral Studies, 30(4), 834-847.
The Demand for Social Insurance: Does Culture Matter?
Eugster Beatrix, Lalive Rafael, Steinhauer Andreas, Zweimüller Josef (2011), The Demand for Social Insurance: Does Culture Matter?, in The Economic Journal, 121(556), 413-448.
Family Dynamics and Swiss Parties on the Rise: Exploring Party Support in a Changing Electoral Context
Fitzgerarld Jennifer (2011), Family Dynamics and Swiss Parties on the Rise: Exploring Party Support in a Changing Electoral Context, in The Journal of Politics, 73(3), 783-796.
Attrition in the Swiss Household Panel: Is Change Associated with Drop-out?
Voorpostel Marieke, Lipps Oliver (2011), Attrition in the Swiss Household Panel: Is Change Associated with Drop-out?, in Journal of Official Statistics, 27(2), 301-318.
Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?
Bottan Nicolas Luis, Pérez Truglia Ricardo (2011), Deconstructing the hedonic treadmill: Is happiness autoregressive?, in The Journal of Socio-Economics, 40(3), 224-236.
Parameters of well-being and subjective health and their relationship with residential traffic noise exposure - A representative evaluation in Switzerland
Brink Mark (2011), Parameters of well-being and subjective health and their relationship with residential traffic noise exposure - A representative evaluation in Switzerland, in Environment International, 37(4), 723-733.
Young people, parents and radical right voting. The Case of the Swiss People’s Party
Coffé Hilde, Voorpostel Marieke (2010), Young people, parents and radical right voting. The Case of the Swiss People’s Party, in Electoral Studies , 29(3), 435-443.
Faire une pause ou bifurquer ? Essai de typologie des trajectoires de formation
Pollien Alexandre (2010), Faire une pause ou bifurquer ? Essai de typologie des trajectoires de formation, in Education et Sociétés, 26(2), 123-143.
Interviewer-Respondent Socio-Demographic Matching and Survey Cooperation
Lipps Oliver (2010), Interviewer-Respondent Socio-Demographic Matching and Survey Cooperation, in Survey Practice, 1-4.
Conceptualizing ‘precarious prosperity’: Empirical and theoretical elements for debate
Budowski Monica, Tillmann Robin, Keim Wiebke, Amacker Michèle (2010), Conceptualizing ‘precarious prosperity’: Empirical and theoretical elements for debate, in International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 51(4), 268-288.
Change of individual BMI in Switzerland and the USA: a multilevel model for growth
Lipps Oliver, Moreau-Gruet Florence (2010), Change of individual BMI in Switzerland and the USA: a multilevel model for growth, in International Journal of Public Health , 55(4), 299-306.
Une société de classes moyennes? Le cas de la société suisse contemporaine
Tillmann Robin (2010), Une société de classes moyennes? Le cas de la société suisse contemporaine, in Sociologie, 1(2), 253-271.
You've Either Got It or You Don't? The Stability of Political Interest over the Life Cycle
Prior Markus (2010), You've Either Got It or You Don't? The Stability of Political Interest over the Life Cycle, in The Journal of Politics, 72(3), 747-766.
Work-life conflict and health among Swiss physicians - in comparison with other university graduates and with the general Swiss working population
Knecht Michaela, Bauer Georg F., Klaghofer Richard, Buddeberg-Fischer Barbara, Stamm Martina, Hämmig Oliver (2010), Work-life conflict and health among Swiss physicians - in comparison with other university graduates and with the general Swiss working population, in Swiss Medical Weekly, 140, 1-7.
Attrition Patterns in the Swiss Household Panel by Demographic Characteristics and Social Involvement
Voorpostel Marieke (2010), Attrition Patterns in the Swiss Household Panel by Demographic Characteristics and Social Involvement, in Swiss Journal of Sociology, 36(2), 359-377.
Cycle de vie et travaux ménagers en Suisse. L'investissement ménager des hommes et des femmes lors des étapes de la construction familiale
Henchoz Caroline, Wernli Boris (2010), Cycle de vie et travaux ménagers en Suisse. L'investissement ménager des hommes et des femmes lors des étapes de la construction familiale, in Revue suisse de sociologie, 36(2), 235-257.
Effects of different Incentives on Attrition and Fieldwork Effort in Telephone Household Panel Surveys
Lipps Oliver (2010), Effects of different Incentives on Attrition and Fieldwork Effort in Telephone Household Panel Surveys, in Survey Research Methods, 4(2), 81-90.
How Answers on Political Attitudes are Shaped by Interviewers. Evidence from a Panel Survey
Lipps Oliver, Lutz Georg (2010), How Answers on Political Attitudes are Shaped by Interviewers. Evidence from a Panel Survey, in Swiss Journal of Sociology, 36(2), 345-357.
Itinéraires de formation et lignes biographiques
Pollien Alexandre, Bonoli Lorenzo (2010), Itinéraires de formation et lignes biographiques, in Revue suisse de sociologie, 36(2), 277-297.
Persuasion Effects in Electoral Campaigns-A Comparative Analysis of Household Panel Data
Kuhn Ursina (2010), Persuasion Effects in Electoral Campaigns-A Comparative Analysis of Household Panel Data, in Schmollers Jahrbuch-Journal of Applied Social Sciences Studies, 131(2), 409-418.
Privation et risque d'appauvrissement en Suisse, 1999-2007
Gazareth Pascale, Suter Christian (2010), Privation et risque d'appauvrissement en Suisse, 1999-2007, in Revue suisse de sociologie, 36(2), 213-234.
The Determinants of Sport Participation in Switzerland
Moschetti Karine (2010), The Determinants of Sport Participation in Switzerland, in Swiss Journal of Sociology, 36(2), 259-276.
Approval of equal rights and gender differences in well-being
Lalive Rafael, Stutzer Alois (2010), Approval of equal rights and gender differences in well-being, in Journal of Population Economics, 23(3), 933-962.
Dauerhafte Bildungsungleichheiten in West-deutschland, Ostdeutschland und der Schweiz: Eine Kohortenbetrachtung der Un-gleichheitsdimensionen soziale Herkunft und Geschlecht
Hadjar Andreas, Berger Joël (2010), Dauerhafte Bildungsungleichheiten in West-deutschland, Ostdeutschland und der Schweiz: Eine Kohortenbetrachtung der Un-gleichheitsdimensionen soziale Herkunft und Geschlecht, in Zeitschrift für Soziologie, 39(3), 182-201.
Does Inequality Harm the Middle Class?
Winkelmann Liliana, Winkelmann Rainer (2010), Does Inequality Harm the Middle Class?, in Kyklos, 63(2), 301-316.
Economics, Religion and Happiness
Steiner Lasse, Leinert Lisa, Frey Bruno S. (2010), Economics, Religion and Happiness, in Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Unternehmensethik, 11(1), 9-24.
Tels parents, tels enfants ? L'utilisation des données de seconde main dans l'étude des influences politiques parentales en Suisse
Wernli Boris (2010), Tels parents, tels enfants ? L'utilisation des données de seconde main dans l'étude des influences politiques parentales en Suisse, in Bulletin de méthodologie sociologique, 106(1), 19-43.
Taller - Healthier - more equal? The biological standard of living in Switzerland in the second half of the 20th century
Kues Arne Benjamin (2010), Taller - Healthier - more equal? The biological standard of living in Switzerland in the second half of the 20th century, in Economics & Human Biology, 8(1), 67-79.
Meaning of Marriage for Men During Their Transition to Fatherhood: The Swiss Context
Le Goff Jean-Marie, Ryser Valérie-Anne (2010), Meaning of Marriage for Men During Their Transition to Fatherhood: The Swiss Context, in Marriage & Family Review , 46(1-2), 107-125.
Loss Shapes Political Views? Terror management, political ideology, and the death of close others
Chatard Armand, Arndt Jamie, Pyszczynski Tom (2010), Loss Shapes Political Views? Terror management, political ideology, and the death of close others, in Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 32(1), 2-7.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Nonmarital Childbearing Workshop 14.09.2011 Southampton, UK
GSOEP/CNEF Data Users Workshop 10.09.2011 Ithaca, USA
10th Conference of the European Sociological Association 07.09.2011 Genève, Switzerland
6th International Conference of Panel Data Users in Switzerland 08.06.2011 Lausanne, Switzerland
Joint Workshop FORS, University of Lausanne and IDSC of IZA on Redistribution and Well-Being 17.03.2011 Lausanne, Switzerland
Annual Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America 19.11.2010 New Orleans, USA
ECSR, QMSS2 and TransEurope Joint Conference 30.09.2010 Bamberg, Germany
European Society on Family Relations 5th Conference 29.09.2010 Milan, Italy
Household Survey Nonresponse Workshop 30.08.2010 Nürnberg, Germany
ISA XVII World Congress of Sociology 11.07.2010 Göteborg, Sweden
International Association for Time Use Research Conference 07.07.2010 Paris, France
SOEP Conference 30.06.2010 Berlin, Germany
SHP Methodological Workshop 08.06.2010 Lausanne, Switzerland
Panel Surveys Methods Workshop 05.06.2010 Mannheim, Germany


Self-organised

Title Date Place
6th International Conference of Panel Data Users in Switzerland 08.06.2011 Lausanne, Switzerland
SHP Methodological Workshop 08.06.2010 Lausanne, Switzerland

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Print (books, brochures, leaflets) Befragung Leben in der Schweiz/Enquête Vivre en Suisse/Indagine Vivere in Svizzera Western Switzerland German-speaking Switzerland Italian-speaking Switzerland 25.08.2011
Media relations: print media, online media Die Milchbüchleinrechnung — Statistik über die Haushalte in der Schweiz NZZ Folio German-speaking Switzerland 01.02.2011
Talks/events/exhibitions Stichproben/Schätzverfahren in Befragungen German-speaking Switzerland 27.08.2010
Media relations: print media, online media Winterthur — die Stadt der glücklichsten Frauen Migros-Magazin German-speaking Switzerland 02.08.2010

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
119363 Panel suisse de ménages 2008-2009 01.01.2008 Research Infrastructure
119358 Schweizer Wahlstudie (Select) 01.01.2008 Research Infrastructure
119360 Mesures et Observation Sociologique des Attitudes en Suisse (MOSAiCH/ISSP) 01.01.2008 Research Infrastructure
139515 Weiterführung und Institutionelle Konsolidierung der Sozialberichterstattung 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure
139520 MOSAiCH 2013 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure
119359 European Social Survey (ESS) 01.01.2008 Research Infrastructure
151003 LIS - Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg (formerly "Luxembourg Income Study"): Access to the Databases for Swiss Researchers 01.01.2014 Research Infrastructure
139518 LIS - Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg (formerly "Luxembourg Income Study"): Access to the Databases for Swiss Researchers 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure
139523 European Social Survey 2012 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure
139522 SWISS HOUSEHOLD PANEL - 2012 - 2013 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure

Abstract

The present research proposal aims at the financial support for the continuation of the Swiss Household Panel (SHP) for the years 2010-2011.The principal aim of the Swiss Household Panel (SHP), a longitudinal study launched in 1999, is to observe social change. In particular, it follows the dynamics of changing living conditions and representations in the population of Switzerland. By observing the same individuals over the course of time it allows not only to study the change in numbers (net change) but also the flow of movements between the various states of being (gross change). Moreover, the SHP is a comprehensive survey covering a broad range of social fields and a variety of topics and all members of the households in the panel aged 14 years and over are questioned.During the years 1998-2007, The Swiss Household Panel was a joint project run by the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Federal Statistical Office and the University of Neuchâtel. Since January 2008, the SHP is part of the Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences (FORS), located at the University of Lausanne.An overview of the present and future Swiss social sciences survey landscape shows that the SHP has a special place in the Swiss survey landscape, being the unique longitudinal study offering data to analyse micro social change on the mid to long term and on a comprehensive basis. Other longitudinal surveys either offer a smaller range of topics, follow a restricted subgroup, or allow only the study of short term transitions.Since its origin in 1999, the survey has annually covered a broad range of topics and approaches in the social sciences and includes both subjective assessments and concrete information. The household interviews last 15 minutes on average, with the individual ones lasting around 35 minutes.The survey is composed of two stratified samples of private households whose members represent the non-institutional resident population in Switzerland. They were drawn randomly in 1999 (SHP_I) and in 2004 (SHP_II), and are interviewed annually from September to February in the three main official national languages using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI).The new data are available for users approximately one year after collection; this is after numerous quality checks are carried out by our Oracle electronic documentation system and new user-friendly variables are constructed (e.g. household typologies, standardized income, social stratification scales, etc.). To date, the first ten waves of SHP_I and five waves of SHP_II have been carried out successfully, and the first nine waves are already available to researchers, including data from the households recruited in 1999 (SHP_I, waves 1 to 9) and from the 2004 refreshment sample (SHP_II, waves 1 to 4). Globally, between 1999 and 2009 22’000 persons, members of more than 8’500 household were followed by the SHP_I and SHP_II, of which nearly 15’000 were interviewed personally.The problem of attrition is the principal threat of any longitudinal study; nonresponse decreases the size of samples and can cause bias in survey estimates. Consequent measures have been taken to stabilize attrition rates (and even to increase participation) from 2006 to 2008 (waves 8 to 10 of SHP_I and waves 3 to 5 of SHP_II). Thus, from 2006, the number of interviews conducted for the SHP_I was increased; this phenomenon was also observed in the SHP_II in 2008. Consequently, in 2009 and beyond, similar measures will be taken.As of June 2009, the research network “Living in Switzerland” counts some 570 registered members, who analyse the SHP data on a very large variety of topics (1052 were mentioned). The domains range over life-course analysis, health, poverty, living conditions of elderly people or immigrants, political participation and life satisfaction, etc.Among the SHP the data users, sociology (42%) and economics (21%) are by far the most prevalent disciplines, followed by political science (10%), statistics (6%), public health (5%), and psychology (3%). But a few technical scientists and geographers are also present, indicating that spatially related topics are also being analysed using the SHP data. The data users belong mainly to swiss academic institutions (65%), but also to international academic institutions (14%), public administrations (13%), and private institutes (8%).A recent (June 2009) review of the literature (especially journal articles, books, official reports) shows that 258 publications are based on SHP data: among them are 71 journal articles, 64 books or book sections, 97 reports or working papers, and 26 thesis. Nearly all modules and sub-modules of our questionnaires were used.Since 2004 (except in 2008), the Swiss Household Panel has organised an annual International Conference of Panel Data Users in Switzerland. These conferences have greatly contributed to the interdisciplinary scientific exchange among Swiss and foreign researchers using the SHP data for their analyses and publications. The last issue, the 5th International Conference of Panel Data Users in Switzerland took place on June 4 and 5, 2009 at the University of Lausanne. A Methodological Workshop dedicated to the Analysis of Longitudinal Data was also held. It must be stressed that, for the first time, the conference was almost fully dedicated to longitudinal analysis and attended by (mostly) regular data users.Moreover, a special issue of the Swiss Journal of Sociology on “Longitudinal Analysis in Switzerland”, focusing on social change and stability in Switzerland, will be published in 2010.During the next funding period (2010-2011), we plan to conduct development work in three main areas, i.e. (1) communication and incentives; (2) weighting schemes, and (3) questionnaires, mainly to (1) fight attrition, and (2) improve the analytical potential of the SHP for the scientific community.During the same period, we will, moreover, (a) implement a (secure) system of internet dissemination of data and documentation, (b) take decisions regarding a potential new sample for the next funding period (2012-2013), and (c) possibly implement alternative modes of data collection according to respondents' requests.In practice, we propose to implement during the 2010-2011 period several changes concerning the mode and the amount of incentives, namely the introduction of unconditional monetary incentive in place of rewarding only participants. We also plan to introduce conditional monetary incentive for the household if all eligible members of the family participate in the SHP, with the opportunity to convert this cash into a donation.The advancement of the weighting of the Swiss Household Panel (SHP) data is also an ongoing project. We propose four improvements to offer more research opportunities with the SHP data, namely (1) to develop transitional longitudinal weights for individuals, (2) to create longitudinal weights for households, (3) to implement a new transversal weighting scheme that incorporates households consisting entirely of non-original sample members (non-OSMs), and (4) to create weights for children with age less than 14.Regarding questionnaire development, we will implement two main measures: (1) revision of the current questionnaires (SHP_I and SHP_II), and (2) construction of new questionnaires for a potential SHP_III. A modularization of these questionaires is foreseen, leading to a differentiated system of questioning similar to other panels, with a core part asked each year, a rotating core of questions repeated at given time intervals, and unique questions asked only once.The present proposal for funding covers the 12th and 13th wave of data collection for the original 1999 SHP_I and the waves 7 and 8 of the 2004 SHP_II for the years 2010-2011, as well as the salaries of 11 scientific, technical and administrative collaborators amounting to 8.6 full-time positions.
-