Project

Back to overview

Interactions of nanoparticles with membrane systems of cells of higher water plants - towards mechanisms of nano-phytotoxicity

English title Interactions of nanoparticles with membrane systems of cells of higher water plants - towards mechanisms of nano-phytotoxicity
Applicant Sienkiewicz Andrzej
Number 128068
Funding scheme SCOPES
Research institution Laboratoire de nanostructures et nouveaux matériaux électroniques EPFL - SB - IPMC - LNNME
Institution of higher education EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Main discipline Other disciplines of Environmental Sciences
Start/End 01.01.2010 - 30.09.2013
Approved amount 100'000.00
Show all

Keywords (10)

nanoparticles; nanotoxicity; water plants; cell electrophysiology; electron spin resonance; cell mebranes; reactive oxygen species; atomic force microscopy; ecotoxicity; cell membranes

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Nanomaterials, with at least one dimension of 100 nm or less, are increasingly being used for commercial purposes such as fillers, opacifiers, catalysts, semiconductors, cosmetics, microelectronics, and drug carriers. The production, use, and disposal of nanomaterials will inevitably lead to their release into air, water, and soil. Thus, while nanoparticles are finding their way into the environment through deliberate and accidental actions, ecotoxicological properties and the risks related to these novel materials have not yet been fully explored. Moreover, although an increasing number of scientific reports highlight the impact of nanomaterials on human/animal cells/organs, only very few studies have been performed to assess phytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Therefore, this project is focused on mechansims of nanoparticle uptake and internalization by cells of two higher water plants, Elodea Canadensis and Trianea bogotensis Karst. In particular, we will study a wide range of interaction mechanisms of nano-engineered materials with selected cellular structures of these two higher water plants. These both plants have well known electrophysiological characteristics and can easily be cultured and handled in the laboratory conditions. The 'nano-bio' interactions of our interest range from nanoparticles trafficking through cellular membranes, translocation into cytosol and subcellular compartments, to their general transmission in whole living plants. Thus, the project focuses on the nanoparticle-induced changes in the structure and transport of the plasma membranes. Epidermal cells of roots of the aquatic flowering plant Trianea bogotensis Krst and cells of leaves of Elodea Canadensis were selected as the subject of investigations. To achieve this goal, we will use a multidisciplinary approach, including electrophysiological methods, electron spin resonance (ESR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Three potentially toxic scenarios of interactions of nanoparticles with the primary biological barriers (plasma- and endomembranes) will be considered: (i) nanoparticles do not penetrate the plasma membrane, but cause physical disruption of its structure, (ii) nanoparticles diffuse through the plasma membrane and during their transport affect changes in the functions of active and passive ion membrane channels, and (iii) nanoparticles are internalized by endocytosis into cells and interact with endomembranes. The overall goal of the project is to contribute to a better understanding of interaction mechanisms of nano-engineered materials with water plants and set the groundwork for the development of models of nano-phytotoxicity.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Int. Workshop Biomolecules and Nanostructures 4, May 15-19, 2013, Pultusk, Poland Talk given at a conference Multifunctional magnetic-photoluminescent-photocatalytic nanostructures for biomedical applications 15.05.2013 Pultusk, Poland Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
Swiss Soft Days 10th edition, Paul Scherrer Institute Villigen, March 4th, 2013 Poster Tracking up-conversion nano-phosphors and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in aquatic plants: ESR and confocal microscopy assays 04.03.2013 Villingen, Switzerland Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
Swiss NanoConvention 2012, Lausanne, May 22-24, 2012 Poster Multi-functional magnetic-photoluminescent-photocatalytic polymer-based micro- and nano-fibers obtained by electrospinning 22.05.2012 Lausanne, Switzerland Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Strasbourg, May 14-18, 2012, Symposium G: Functional biomaterials Talk given at a conference Electro-spun polystyrene-based multi-functional magnetic-photoluminescent-photocatalytic fibers containing NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ upconverting nanophosphors and gamma-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles 14.05.2012 Strasbourg, France Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Strasbourg, May 14-18, 2012, Symposium G: Functional biomaterials Talk given at a conference Size- and shape-dependence of the photo-dynamic properties towards generation of singlet oxygen in beta-NaYF4:Yb,Er nanophosphors 14.05.2012 Strasbourg, France Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
E-MRS 2012 Spring Meeting, Strasbourg, May 14-18, 2012, Symposium G: Functional biomaterials Poster Multi-functional magnetic-photoluminescent-photocatalytic polymer-based fibers obtained by electro-spinning 14.05.2012 Strasbourg, France Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
E-MRS 2011 Fall Meeting, Warsaw, Sept. 19-23, 2011 Poster Observation of size dependence in near-infrared-to-visible up-conversion and photochemical properties of NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanophosphors 19.09.2011 Warsaw, Poland Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
Nano-Tera Yearly Meeting 2011, Bern, May 12-13, 2011 Poster Up-converting Nano-phosphors for Biomedical Applications 12.05.2011 Bern, Switzerland Sienkiewicz Andrzej;
Nano-Tera Yearly Meeting 2011 Poster Up-converting Nano-phosphors for Biomedical Applications 12.05.2011 bern, Switzerland Sienkiewicz Andrzej; Forro Laszlo;
E-MRS 2011 Spring Meeting, Nice, May 9-13, 2011 Poster Bio-imaging with up-converting nanophosphors in C. Elegans and E. canadensis 09.05.2011 Nice , France Sienkiewicz Andrzej;


Abstract

The impact of nanoparticles on human/animal cells and certain bacteria, as well as on simple aquatic organisms (algae, daphnia), and, finally, on fish and small laboratory animals (mice and rats), has already been quite well docu-mented. In contrast, very few studies have been conducted to assess nanotoxicity to ecological terrestrial species, particularly plants. In particular, the mechanisms of nanopar-ticle-induced phytotoxicity remain largely unknown and little information is available on the potential uptake of nanopar-ticles by plants and their subsequent fate within the food chain. Recent research points, however, to the existence of adverse effects of nanoparticles on plants. Since plants serve as a foundation of the food chain, they are also a possible route for nanoparticles in the environment. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to elucidate the role of nanoparticles in fundamental biochemical reactions, as well as to assess the mechanisms of their interactions with cellular and tissue components in plants. To assess mechanisms of nanotoxicity in plants, in this project, we will study nanoparticle interactions with cellular and subcellular components of selected higher water plants. In particular, we will focus our research on the nanoparticles-induced events occurring at the cell membranes. The cellular membranes, especially plasma membranes, constitute first barriers for nanoparticles in their effort to enter into the cytoplasm. Thus, the study of interaction mechanisms of nanoparticles with cellular membranes can provide a solid basis for toxicological standardization of nanomaterials and might lead to a fundamental methodology for predicting the impact of nanoparticles on plants. In brief: This project is focused on mechanisms of nanoparticle uptake and internalization by cells of higher water plants. We will study a wide range of interaction mechanisms of nano-engineered materials with selected cellular structures of two higher water plants, Elodea Canadensis and Trianea bogotensis Karst. These plants have well known electrophysiological characteristics and can easily be cultured and handled in the laboratory conditions. The ‘nano-bio’ interactions of our interest range from nanoparticles trafficking through cellular membranes, translocation into cytosol and subcellular compartments, to their general transmission in whole living plants. A particular focus will be on cellular membranes. The hydroponically grown plants will be exposed to: (i) metal-based nanoparticles, such as silver and gold colloids and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), (ii) carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerenes C60 and C70, their derivatives, as well as single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs), and (iii) semiconducting oxides nanomaterials, such as nanoTiO2 and nanoZnO, including corresponding nanowires and nanotubes. These three classes on nano-engineered materials have now numerous industrial and biomedical applications and can be considered as potential major environmental nano-pollutants. In this project we will combine several highly-specific spectroscopic techniques, such as: transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical microscopy (OM), and electron spin resonance (ESR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), with advanced electrophysiological methods. TEM, OM, AFM and ESR will be employed to thoroughly characterize nano-engineered materials used in this project. A multidisciplinary approach will help in finding the evidence that the exposure to nano-engineered materials might induce damage and influence plants` metabolism at various development stages. In particular, the microelectrode-based electrophysiological technique will be used to follow the structural and metabolic changes in cells of Elodea Canadensis and Trianea bogotensis Karst exposed to the nano-engineered systems. ESR in combination with membrane-embedded spin probes and intra- and extracellular spin-traps will be used to follow the changes in the membrane fluidity changes, as well as to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants exposed to nanoparticles. Although an increasing number of scientific reports highlight the impact of nanomaterials on human/animal cells/organs, very few studies have been performed to assess phytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Therefore, the proposed research represents a high degree of innovation and novelty. The results of this project will provide a solid base for a better understanding of interaction mechanisms of nano-engineered materials with water plants and should set the groundwork for the development of models of nano-phytotoxicity.It has also to be pointed out that this joint research project combines experience and high level skills in plant electrophysiology of the Khazar University team with the potential of the LNNME/EPFL team in technology of nanostructured materials and advanced characterization techniques.
-