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Fabrication and investigation of carbon nanotube based sensors and (bio)nanocomposite materials

English title Fabrication and investigation of carbon nanotube based sensors and (bio)nanocomposite materials
Applicant Forro Laszlo
Number 128037
Funding scheme SCOPES
Research institution Laboratoire de nanostructures et nouveaux matériaux électroniques EPFL - SB - IPMC - LNNME
Institution of higher education EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Main discipline Condensed Matter Physics
Start/End 01.01.2010 - 30.06.2013
Approved amount 210'000.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Condensed Matter Physics
Inorganic Chemistry

Keywords (11)

carbon nanotube; (bio)nanocomposite; sensor; theoretical calculations; material science characterization; nanowires; ZnO; sensors; nanocomposite materials; light conversion; biomaterials

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
A multidisciplinary team from Switzerland, Armenia, Hungary and Serbia is formed with the participation of experts from the fields of physics, chemistry, biology and material science in order to work on nanotube based sensors and (bio)nanocomposite materials. While the Swiss laboratory will continuously provide high tech instruments for comprehensive characterization, Serbian colleagues will supply theoretical background for each participant during the whole project. With the above-mentioned "tail-wind" Armenian researchers will develop stable, sensitive and selective hybrid metal oxide/carbon nanotube gas sensors working approximately room temperatures, and Hungarians will produce specially tailored inorganic/CNTs composite materials as carriers and photosensitive bionanocomposite samples. Conversion of sunlight with high efficiency to either electricity or fuel is one of the most pressing challenges of the 21th century. The interest from society in new energy carriers, in particular from renewable sources, is rapidly increasing. Devices that operate above the existing performance limit will require the discovery of new materials and new pathways for solar conversion. Breakthrough can be only expected from a broad range of research activities and basic research is essential for identifying new materials and processes to make efficient solar generated devices. Gas sensors working at low temperatures of pre-heating of substrate or without of it are also very important not only for the community but the environment, too. They would allow dramatically decreasing consumed electric power of gas sensitive devices and making them compatible with ICs and modern electronics as well as much cheaper. Theoretical support will ensure the optimization of experimental activity. Facilities provided by Switzerland will give an immediate feedback of sample quality. This step-by-step approach will increase research efficacy significantly. The cooperating laboratories will work with complementary methodology addressing the scientific problems outlined here. The rather extensive know-how of the laboratories in the application of techniques will be extremely useful. The main goals of this project are:-fabrication of specially tailored inorganic/CNTs composite materials (Szeged) -developing stable, sensitive and selective hybrid metal oxide/CNT gas sensors (Yerevan) -binding photosynthetic reaction center protein and redox active dye molecules on the surface of carrier carbon materials (Szeged) -theoretical symmetry based an
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Gas sensors made of multiwall carbon nanotubes modified by tin dioxide
Arakelyan Valeri M., Aleksanyan M. S., Hovhannisyan R. V., Shahnazaryan Gohar E., Aroutiounian Vladimir M., Hernádi Klára, Németh Zoltán Á, Fórró László (2013), Gas sensors made of multiwall carbon nanotubes modified by tin dioxide, in Journal of Contemporary Physics, 48(4), 176-183.
Preparation and characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube/In 2O3 composites
Berki Péter, Németh Zoltán Á, Réti Balázs, Berkesi Ottó, Magrez Arnaud, Aroutiounian Vladimir M., Fórró László, Hernádi Klára (2013), Preparation and characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotube/In 2O3 composites, in Carbon, 60, 266-272.
Study of the surface-ruthenated SnO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite thick-film gas sensors
Aroutiounian V. M., Adamyan A. Z., Khachaturyan E. A., Adamyan Z. N., Hernadi K., Pallai Z., Nemeth Z., Forro L., Magrez A., Horvath E. (2013), Study of the surface-ruthenated SnO2/MWCNTs nanocomposite thick-film gas sensors, in SENSORS AND ACTUATORS B-CHEMICAL, 177, 308-315.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
International conference and winterschool Talk given at a conference 02.09.2013 Kirchberg, Austria Forro Laszlo; Hernadi Klara;


Knowledge transfer events



Self-organised

Title Date Place
Scopes valorisation meeting 05.06.2013 Szeged, Hungary

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
121814 Synthesis and characterization of Carbon Nanotubes-Functional Polymers Composites for MEMS amd Microfluidic Applications 01.10.2008 Project funding

Abstract

The rapid advancement of nanotechnology for the development of miniaturized sensors, bio-based materials, actuators, and other emerging devices is growing at a high speed and predictions of future growth are impressive and exciting. The impact of these technologies is seen in many industrial sectors. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been the focus of considerable research since 1991 because of their unique properties and tremendous potential applications. Research pertaining to the interaction between carbon nanotubes and conjugated other structures is attracting growing interest as a new topic of basic research with several potential applications ranging from sensing to photovoltaics. Combining their remarkable electrical, thermal and mechanical properties with other special properties of conjugated components is also a promising direction to constituting composite materials for utilization in various fields of nanotechnologies. As to incorporating CNTs into matrix, problems still exist due to the difficulty in dispersing CNTs uniformly throughout the composite and the poor adhesion between them. Coating CNTs with materials may be an excellent candidate, because it could eliminate the undesirable attractive interactions between the nanotubes and improve the interfacial bonding with matrix.The present consortium shaped for solving this kind of problems is composed of leading laboratories from Switzerland, Armenia, Hungary and Serbia. Concerning complexity of current tasks, a powerful multidisciplinary team is formed with the participation of experts from the fields of physics, chemistry, biology and material science. While the Swiss laboratory will continuously provide high tech instruments for comprehensive characterization, Serbian colleagues will supply theoretical background for each participant during the whole project. With the above-mentioned “tail-wind” Armenian researchers will develop stable, sensitive and selective hybrid metal oxide/carbon nanotube gas sensors working approximately room temperatures and having low cost, and Hungarians will produce specially tailored inorganic/CNTs composite materials as carriers and photosensitive bionanocomposite samples. Conversion of sunlight with high efficiency to either electricity or fuel is one of the most pressing challenges of the 21th century. The interest from society in new energy carriers, in particular from renewable sources, is rapidly increasing. Devices that operate above the existing performance limit will require the discovery of new materials and new pathways for solar conversion. Breakthrough can be only expected from a broad range of research activities and basic research is essential for identifying new materials and processes to make efficient solar generated devices. Gas sensors working at low temperatures of pre-heating of substrate or without of it are also very important not only for the community but the environment, too. They would allow dramatically decreasing consumed electric power of gas sensitive devices and making them compatible with ICs and modern electronics as well as much cheaper. Theoretical support will ensure the optimization of experimental activity. Facilities provided by Switzerland will give an immediate feedback of sample quality. This step-by-step approach will increase research efficacy significantly. The cooperating laboratories will work with complementary methodology addressing the scientific problems outlined here. The rather extensive know-how of the laboratories in the application of techniques will be extremely useful. The main goals of this project are:?fabrication of specially tailored inorganic/CNTs composite materials (Szeged)?developing stable, sensitive and selective hybrid metal oxide/CNT gas sensors (Yerevan)?binding photosynthetic reaction center protein and redox active dye molecules on the surface of carrier carbon materials (Szeged)?theoretical symmetry based and numerical investigations of quasi one-dimensional nanostructures: SWNT, MWNT, inorganic nanostructures and biomolecules (Belgrade)?continuous characterization of above-mentioned nanostructures by various techniques (Lausanne)International interaction is a precondition for high-standard research. With a consortium having a great variety of scientific tools and knowledge, a holistic approach of the selected topic can be carried out. In order to reduce the more or less unavoidable deadlocks in experimental sciences there is a growing need for inter- and multidisciplinarity. The knowledge base forming hereby means: common sense, experience and skills, however, financial and instrumental tools attainable for participating Easter European countries by SNSF are a considerable improvement.Collaboration will strengthen scientific (and hopefully economic) ties between Switzerland and Eastern Europe not only for a few years but this project could establish a long-term cooperation via young participants. For the latter ones the integration as individuals and also at the institutional level into the international scientific community will be a wonderful occasion. The possibility for increasing capacities (PhD positions), purchasing small laboratory equipments, visiting partner laboratories and traveling to international conferences (often not accessible from local EE scientific funding if any) could help to overcome many problems in Eastern European region. Collaboration will be continuous during the years of the project, with frequent correspondence, personal visits, conference participations on the work and its results. Cooperation in a multilateral project would help not only on improving the quality and increasing the networking level of scientific research but - via both the production and exchange of knowledge - have a long lasting impact on higher education of science at each participating university. A strongly correlating research plan emphasizes the necessity of a close collaboration throughout the whole period. For success, jointly established objectives and shared responsibility (Research plan 2.5.) are necessities. The cooperating partners have widespread and detailed experiences in these fields and their facilities are largely complementary. As a consequence of multidisciplinary interlocking, common accountability and participation are essential for effective partnership. The utility of the project is defined by its public reception: the research results may contribute to the achievement of the objective of an eco-friendly Europe.
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