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Development of Passive Sampling for Water Quality Assessment and for Simulating the Bioconcentration in Aquatic Organism Under Pulsed Exposure Conditions

English title Development of Passive Sampling for Water Quality Assessment and for Simulating the Bioconcentration in Aquatic Organism Under Pulsed Exposure Conditions
Applicant Hollender Juliane
Number 125034
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG)
Institution of higher education Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology - EAWAG
Main discipline Other disciplines of Environmental Sciences
Start/End 01.01.2009 - 30.06.2011
Approved amount 383'471.00
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Keywords (8)

water quality assessment; passive sampling; polar organic micropollutants; organic trace analytics; bioaccumulation; bioconcentration; water quality criteria; polar organic compounds

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
LeadPassive sampling is a technique to monitor pollutants in water. A device is placed in a water body and accumulates chemicals over time. In our project, we try to improve this technique and investigate how it compares to bioconcentration.HintergrundWater quality criteria have been established to protect the aquatic environment and its inhabitants from pollutants. Commonly, water is sampled from a river or lake and analysed to establish the presence and concentration of pollutants. As concentrations of pollutants vary, extensive sampling campaigns are needed to establish the exposure of wildlife to pollutants. Passive sampling is a technique that was developed to reduce the costs and enhance the quality of these monitoring campaigns. Passive sampling shares a number of features with bioconcentration, further underlying the biological relevance of the technique. However, it is not yet resolved how passive sampling relates to the kinetics of bioconcentration of different polar pollutants. Furthermore, a problem with passive sampling is that the uptake of chemicals into a sampler depends on environmental factors, such as water flow rate. Converting passive sampling data to aqueous concentrations is thus problematic.Das ZielThe main aim of the project is to make passive sampling a more robust technique and to better understand its biological relevance. To do this, we will devise a system that can be used to correct passive sampling data for effects of environmental conditions, and we will compare passive sampling to bioconcentration in various biota (algae, daphnids and fish eggs).BedeutngWater quality criteria require adequate sampling tools, we will characterise passive samplers that are integrative over short and longer periods - to match monitoring for acute and chronic exposure. We aim to enhance the robustness of these tools by implementing a system that corrects passive sampling data for environmental conditions. Most experiments will be run with river water, thus we skip the possibly difficult step of having to implement a lab tool in a field situation. Finally, we directly compare passive sampling and bioconcentration, this will aid the understanding for which kinds of chemicals, passive samplers have added biological rel
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Uptake and release kinetics of 22 polar organic chemicals in the Chemcatcher passive sampler
Vermeirssen Etiënne L M, Dietschweiler Conrad, Escher Beate Isabella, Van Der Voet Jürgen, Hollender Juliane (2013), Uptake and release kinetics of 22 polar organic chemicals in the Chemcatcher passive sampler, in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 405(15), 5225-5236.
Transfer kinetics of polar organic compounds over polyethersulfone membranes in the passive samplers POCIS and Chemcatcher
Vermeirssen Etienne L.M., Dietschweiler Conrad, Escher Beate I., van der Voet Jürgen, Hollender Juliane (2012), Transfer kinetics of polar organic compounds over polyethersulfone membranes in the passive samplers POCIS and Chemcatcher, in Environmental Science and Technology, 46, 6759-6766.
Linking toxicity in algal and bacterial assays with chemical analysis in passive samplers deployed in 21 treated sewage effluents
Vermeirssen Etiënne L M, Hollender Juliane, Bramaz Nadine, Van Der Voet Jürgen, Escher Beate Isabella (2010), Linking toxicity in algal and bacterial assays with chemical analysis in passive samplers deployed in 21 treated sewage effluents, in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 29(11), 2575-2582.
Passive sampling combined with ecotoxicological and chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and biocides - evaluation of three Chemcatcher™ configurations
Vermeirssen Etiënne L M, Bramaz Nadine, Hollender Juliane, Singer Heinz P., Escher Beate Isabella (2009), Passive sampling combined with ecotoxicological and chemical analysis of pharmaceuticals and biocides - evaluation of three Chemcatcher™ configurations, in Water Research, 43(4), 903-914.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Dr. Cecile Miege, Dr. Romain Jaquet, Cemagref, Lyon France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Prof. Dr. Richard Greenwood, Portsmouth University, Graham Mills Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Dr. B. Escher, Prof. J. Müller, EnTox, Brisbane Australia (Oceania)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Setac Talk given at a conference Toxicant mixtures in treated sewage effluents sampled with POCIS - polar organic chemical integrative samplers 23.05.2010 Sevilla, Spain Hollender Juliane; Van der Voet Jürgen; Vermeirssen Etienne;


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
141190 Metabolism of polar organic xenobiotics in aquatic organisms: importance and contribution to environmental fate 01.02.2013 Project funding

Abstract

Various organic micropollutants enter rivers and lakes and this undefined mixture and their associated metabolites are still increasing in diversity. The multitude of micropollutants leads to an undesired and problematic exposure situation for aquatic organisms. For these reasons, there are increasing efforts to set-up water quality standards for organic micropollutants, initially for persis-tent hydrophobic compounds but more recently also for polar organic compounds such as herbicides and pharmaceuticals. These developments in the area of water quality assessment require that appropriate sampling tools are available to support current and future monitoring programs. This proposal targets fundamental research on passive sampling - a promising sampling tool for supporting water quality monitoring.In passive sampling, organic micropollutants diffuse to the sampler surface and then partition between the water and sampler phase, typically a polymer or a bulk phase. Depending on the design of the sampler, passive samplers can be left in surface waters for days or weeks. Thus, passive samplers offer the opportunity to assess average exposure over time frames that match those of water quality criteria monitoring programs. A relatively unexplored area with these devices is how the sampling rate of a polar organic sampler (POS) can be corrected for environmental parameters that affect uptake, e.g. fouling of the sampler. Therefore we plan to do all experiments under semi-field conditions with a bypass system, flow-through channels that use water directly drawn from a river or a wastewater treatment plant but under controlled flow conditions. It is also not established how well the technique works under strongly fluctuating exposure situation as they are often encountered in small rivers and for seasonally occurring micropollutants such as pesticides. We want to address this problem by exploring the exposure situations under different designed peak exposure scenarios. We aim to develop a POS that is integrative over short and longer exposure periods - to match monitoring for acute and chronic water quality criteria - and that comes with a performance reference compounds (PRC) system to correct passive sampling data for environmental conditions. Research on the development and implementation of a PRC system is imperative for the generation of robust passive sampling data. We plan to use Empore disks as sampling phase and silicone polymer as matrix for the PRC. In addition, it has not yet been explored how well polar organic samplers mimic bioconcentration in aquatic organisms. We plan to address the fundamental question, for which classes of chemicals our passive samplers have biological relevance by comparing passive sampling directly with bioconcentration of chemicals in various aquatic organisms- algal communities grown on glass slides, the invertebrates Daphnia magna and Gammarus pulex and fish eggs. Our experi-ments will specifically deal with peak concentration scenarios, typical for the hydrological dynamics related to storm water run-off events. Specifically, we want to answer the following research questions:1. Are protected and unprotected polymer disks suitable for either long-term or short-term integrative sampling?2. Is calibration of uptake rate into POS possible both for short-term and long-term exposure?3. How does dynamic exposure affect the sampling rates of passive sampler?4. How does dynamic exposure affect the bioconcentration kinetics of aquatic organisms?5. Linking uptake in passive samplers and aquatic organisms: Do POS behave biomimetically?The main deliverables of the proposed fundamental research are a more comprehensive understanding of the behavior of polar passive samplers in relation to bioconcentration in organisms and solutions to optimize sampler performance (robustness) under environmentally realistic conditions.
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