Project

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Interfacial behavior of biocompatible poly(hydroxyalkanoate)-based polymers for complex material development

Applicant Meier Wolfgang
Number 124658
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Physikalische Chemie Departement Chemie Universität Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Physical Chemistry
Start/End 01.07.2009 - 30.09.2012
Approved amount 369'550.00
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Keywords (10)

tailor-made poly(hydroxyalkanoate); air-water interface; biomineralization; complex biomaterials; poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s; polymer biosynthesis; Langmuir monolayers; interfaces; templated mineralization; bone tissue engineering

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Novel polymer-inorganic composites attract scientific and commercial attention as potential scaffold material in tissue engineering. Within this project, we are interested in studying the interfacial behavior of modified poly(hydroxyalkanoates) as potential candidates for orthopedic applications to understand the principles of polymer scaffold formation and scaffold-templated inorganic precipitation. For that purpose, poly(hydroxy-?-alkenoates) obtained by bacterial synthesis will be functionalized at double/triple bonds in their side chains with hydrophilic groups or small biologically active moieties (peptide or sugar sequences), to produce amphiphilic macromolecules capable of self-organization in asymmetric environments (such as interfaces). In particular, we will focus on spread (insoluble) monolayers at the air-water interface: this experimental set-up will generate detailed information concerning molecular organization, orientation, monolayer morphology and thickness, and mutual interactions between film components upon two-dimensional phase transitions. In addition, we will employ the monolayer technique to investigate for the first time the polymer affinity to natural (cell) membrane components, such as lipids, sterols, sugars and proteins, to learn about the physical chemistry behind (down to interaction thermodynamics) to be able to model the living cells' behavior in the presence of synthetic material. In the next step, we will use monomolecular polymer films at the air-water interface to trigger and template the growth of inorganics. We will study how the morphology of the model inorganic compound, calcium phosphate (CaP), depends on the polymer chemistry, structure and size, and the monolayer parameters (density, thickness, elasticity). Here, we will be able to determine the CaP growth kinetics and stability of the produced inorganic-polymer composites, to understand which material parameters could be improved for potential applications. Finally, we will be interested in investigating our composite materials for cell compatibility, first using fibroblasts, and later bone cells (osteoblasts) to learn how the polymer properties influence the cell attachment and growth. As a result, the gained knowledge will help to answer fundamental, physico-chemical questions concerning complex biomaterial behavior at the molecular level and concomitantly tailor poly(hydroxyalkanoates) to orthopedic tissue engineering applications.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Head Group Infl uence on Lipid Interactions With a Polyhydroxyalkanoate Biopolymer
Jagoda Agnieszka, Zinn Manfred, Meier Wolfgang, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna (2012), Head Group Infl uence on Lipid Interactions With a Polyhydroxyalkanoate Biopolymer, in Macromolecular Chemistry and physics, 213, 1922-1932.
Putting Cells Under Pressure: A Simple and Efficient Way to Enhance the Productivity of Medium-Chain-Length Polyhydroxyalkanoate in Processes With Pseudomonas putida KT2440
Follonier Stephanie, Henes Bernhard, Panke Sven, Zinn Manfred (2012), Putting Cells Under Pressure: A Simple and Efficient Way to Enhance the Productivity of Medium-Chain-Length Polyhydroxyalkanoate in Processes With Pseudomonas putida KT2440, in Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 109, 451-461.
Pressure to kill or pressure to boost: a review on the various effects and applications of hydrostatic pressure in bacterial biotechnology
Follonier Stéphanie, Panke Sven, Zinn Manfred (2012), Pressure to kill or pressure to boost: a review on the various effects and applications of hydrostatic pressure in bacterial biotechnology, in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnolology, 93, 1805-1815.
Interactions of Biodegradable Poly([R]-3-hydroxy-10-undecenoate) with 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine Lipid: A Monolayer Study
Jagoda Agnieszka, Ketikidis Pantelis, Zinn Manfred, Meier Wolfgang, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna (2011), Interactions of Biodegradable Poly([R]-3-hydroxy-10-undecenoate) with 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine Lipid: A Monolayer Study, in Langmuir, 27, 10878-10885.
Growth and accumulation dynamics of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 cultivated in continuous culture under transient feed conditions
Zinn Manfred, Durner Roland, Zinn Hanspeter, Ren Qun, Egli Thomas, Witholt Bernard (2011), Growth and accumulation dynamics of poly(3-hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 cultivated in continuous culture under transient feed conditions, in Biotechnology Journal, 6, 1240-1252.
Enzymatic Surface Hydrolysis of PET: Effect of Structural Diversity on Kinetic Properties of Cutinases from Thermobifida
Herrero Acero Enrique, Ribitsch Doris, Steinkellner Georg, Gruber Karl, Greimel Katrin, Eiteljoerg Inge, Trotscha Eva, Wei Ren, Zimmermann Wolfgang, Zinn Manfred, Cavaco-Paulo Artur, Freddi Giuliano, Schwab Helmut, Guebitz Georg (2011), Enzymatic Surface Hydrolysis of PET: Effect of Structural Diversity on Kinetic Properties of Cutinases from Thermobifida, in Macromolecules, 44, 4632-4640.
A reduction in growth rate of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 counteracts productivity advances in medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate production from gluconate
Follonier Stéphanie, Panke Sven, Zinn Manfred (2011), A reduction in growth rate of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 counteracts productivity advances in medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate production from gluconate, in Microbial Cell Factories, 10, 1-9.
Simultaneous Biosynthesis of Two Copolymers in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 Using a Two-Stage Continuous Culture System
Hartmann Rene, Hany Roland, Witholt Bernard, Zinn Manfred (2010), Simultaneous Biosynthesis of Two Copolymers in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 Using a Two-Stage Continuous Culture System, in Biomacromolecules, 11, 1488-1493.
Calcium Phosphate Mineralization beneath a Polycationic Monolayer at the Air–Water Interface
Junginger Mathias, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna, Schuster Thomas, Reiche Juergen, Schacher Felix, Mueller Axel H.E., Coelfen Helmut, Taubert Andreas (2010), Calcium Phosphate Mineralization beneath a Polycationic Monolayer at the Air–Water Interface, in Macromolecular Bioscience, 10, 1084-1092.
Enatiomerically pure hydroxycarboxylic acids: current approaches and future perspectives
Ren Qun, Ruth Katinka, Thöny-Meyer Linda, Zinn manfred (2010), Enatiomerically pure hydroxycarboxylic acids: current approaches and future perspectives, in Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology , 87, 41-52.
Amphiphilic Polymers at Interfaces
Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna, Junginger Mathias, Belegrinou Serena, Taubert Andreas (2010), Amphiphilic Polymers at Interfaces, in Mueller Axel H.E. (ed.), Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 151-201.
Biocompatibility of polyhydroxyalkanoate as a potential material for ligament and tendon scaffold material
Rathbone S., Furrer P., Luebben J., Zinn M., Cartmell S. (2010), Biocompatibility of polyhydroxyalkanoate as a potential material for ligament and tendon scaffold material, in Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 93A, 1391-1403.
Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air–water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization
Junginger Mathias, Bleek Katrin, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna, Reiche Juergen, Shkilnyy Andriy, Schacher Felix, Mueller Axel H.E., Taubert Andreas (2010), Calcium phosphate growth beneath a polycationic monolayer at the air–water interface: effects of oscillating surface pressure on mineralization, in Nanoscale, 2, 2440-2446.
Factors controlling bacterial attachment and biofilm formation on medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs)
Mauclaire L., Brombacher E., Bünger J.D., Zinn M. (2010), Factors controlling bacterial attachment and biofilm formation on medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs), in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 76, 104-111.
Enzyme-catalyzed polycondensation of polyester macro-diols with divinyl adipate: Green and efficient method for the preparation of thermoplastic block co-polyesters
Dai S., Xue L., Zinn M., Li Z. (2009), Enzyme-catalyzed polycondensation of polyester macro-diols with divinyl adipate: Green and efficient method for the preparation of thermoplastic block co-polyesters, in Biomacromolecules, 10, 3176-3181.
Overexpression and characterization of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate granule bound polymerases from Pseudomonas putida GPo1
Ren Qun, de Roo Guy, Witholt Bernard, Zinn Manfred, Linda Thöny-Meyer Linda (2009), Overexpression and characterization of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate granule bound polymerases from Pseudomonas putida GPo1, in Microbial Cell Factories, 8, 1-9.
Biomimetic supported membranes from amphiphilic block copolymers
Belegrinou Serena, Dorn Jan, Kreiter Max, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna, Sinner Eva-Kathrin, Meier Wolfgang (2009), Biomimetic supported membranes from amphiphilic block copolymers, in Soft Matter, 6, 179-186.
Biodegradable polymer-lipid monolayers as templates for calcium phosphate mineralization
Jagoda Agnieszka, Zinn Manfred, Bieler Eva, Meier Wolfgang, Kita-Tokarczyk Katarzyna, Biodegradable polymer-lipid monolayers as templates for calcium phosphate mineralization, in Journal of materials Chemistry B.
Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by sequential feeding of xylose and octanoic acid in engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440
Le Meur Sylvaine, Zinn Manfred, Egli Thomas, Thöny-Meyer Linda, Ren Qun, Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by sequential feeding of xylose and octanoic acid in engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440, in BMC Biotechnology, 12.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Dr. Gerald Brezesinski, MPI Potsdam, Germany Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Dr. Sarah Cartmell, University of Keele, UK Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Prof. Dr. Andreas Taubert, University of Potsdam, Germany Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Exchange of personnel
Prof. Axel H.E. Mueller, University of Bayreuth Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
European Materials Research Society (E-MRS) Fall Meeting 01.09.2012 Warsaw (PL)
Biomineralization Gordon Research Conference 01.08.2012 New London (NH, USA)
1st P2M Networking Conference- Precision Polymer Materials 01.12.2011 Obernai-Strasbourg (F)
6th Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin Symposium 01.10.2011 Zürich (CH)
European Symposium on Biopolymers (ESBP) 01.09.2011 Dublin (IRL)
ESF-EMBO Symposium: Biological Surfaces and Interfaces 01.06.2011 Sant Feliu de Guixols (E)
Syngenta-Basel Symposium: Syngenta Crop Protection Research Chemistry- Department of Chemistry of the University of Basel 01.01.2011 Basel (CH)
12th International Symposium on Biopolymers 01.10.2010 Stuttgart (D)
Polymers in Biomedicine and Electronics (German Chemical Society meeting) 01.10.2010 Berlin-Dahlem (D)
5th International Summer School on Advanced Biotechnology 01.09.2010 Santa Margherita di Belice (I)
13th International Conference on Organized Molecular Films (LB13) 01.07.2010 Quebec City (Canada)
European Materials Research Society (E-MRS) Spring Meeting 01.06.2010 Strasbourg (F)
seminar at Biomedical and Health Research Centre, University of Leeds (GB) 01.06.2010 Leeds (GB)
16th Swiss Conference on Biomaterials, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering 01.05.2010 Dübendorf (CH)
seminar at Centre for Molecular Nanoscience, School of Chemistry, University of Leeds (GB) 01.02.2010 Leeds, GB
Biowerkstoffe, Tages-Symposium, Biomaterialien - heute und morgen 01.12.2009 Dübendorf (CH)
Empa PhD Students Symposium 2009 01.11.2009 Dübendorf (CH)


Awards

Title Year
2011 SCNAT/SCS Chemistry Travel Award 2011
ESF poster prize 2011

Abstract

Novel polymer-inorganic composites attract scientific and commercial attention as potential scaffolds material in tissue engineering. Within this project, we are interested in studying the interfacial behavior of modified poly(hydroxyalkanoates) as potential candidates for orthopedic applications to understand the principles of polymer scaffold formation and scaffold-templated inorganic precipitation. For that purpose, poly(hydroxy-?-alkenoates) obtained by bacterial synthesis will be functionalized at double/triple bonds in their side chains with hydrophilic groups or small biologically active moieties (peptide or sugar sequences), to produce amphiphilic macromolecules capable of self-organization in asymmetric environments (such as interfaces). In particular, we will focus on spread (insoluble) monolayers at the air-water interface: this experimental set-up will generate detailed information concerning molecular organization, orientation, monolayer morphology and thickness, and mutual interactions between film components upon two-dimensional phase transitions. In addition, we will employ the monolayer technique to investigate for the fist time the polymer affinity to natural (cell) membrane components, such as lipids, sterols, sugars and proteins, to learn about the physical chemistry behind (down to interaction thermodynamics) to be able to model the living cells' behavior in the presence of synthetic material. In the next step, we will use monomolecular polymer films at the air-water interface to trigger and template the growth of inorganics. We will study how the morphology of the model inorganic compound, calcium phosphate (CaP), depends on the polymer chemistry, structure and size, and the monolayer parameters (density, thickness, elasticity). Here, we will be able to determine the CaP growth kinetics and stability of the produced inorganic-polymer composites, to understand which material parameters could be improved for potential applications. Finally, we will be interested in investigating our composite materials for cell compatibility, first using fibroblasts, and later bone cells (osteoblasts) to learn how the polymer properties influence the cell attachment and growth. As a result, the gained knowledge will help to answer fundamental, physico-chemical questions concerning complex biomaterial behavior at the molecular level and concomitantly tailor poly(hydroxyalkanoates) to orthopedic tissue engineering applications.
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