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Electrical response of strained nanoribbons

English title Electrical response of strained nanoribbons
Applicant Kis Andras
Number 122044
Funding scheme Project funding
Research institution Laboratoire d'électronique et structures à l'échelle nanométrique EPFL - STI - IEL - LANES
Institution of higher education EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Main discipline Condensed Matter Physics
Start/End 01.10.2008 - 30.09.2011
Approved amount 157'725.00
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Keywords (6)

electromechanical properties; nanoelectronics; nanomechanics; nanofabrication; AFM; nanoribbons

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Realization of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the next step in the miniaturization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have become widely accepted as optical switches, accelerometers or actuators in ink jet printers. Due to their low mass, ultralow power consumption and high sensitivity, NEMS have promising applications as highly sensitive mass, displacement, charge and energy detectors.A typical NEMS device consists of a moving beam with dimensions in the nanometer range and an associated scheme for motion detection. In this project we will explore new types of materials in the shape of nanoribbons and their potential applications as mobile elements in NEMS. We will apply mechanical strain to nanoribbons and measure conductance changes that result from mechanical stress.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene
Benameur Muhammed M., Gargiulo Fernando, Manzeli Sajedeh, Autès Gabriel, Tosun Mahmut, Yazyev Oleg V., Kis Andras (2015), Electromechanical oscillations in bilayer graphene, in Nature Communications, 6, 8582-8582.
Visibility of dichalcogenide nanolayers
M M Benameur B. Radisavljevic J. S. Heron S. Sahoo H. Berger A. Kis (2011), Visibility of dichalcogenide nanolayers, in Nanotechnology, 22, 125706-125711.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
TU Dresden Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Transition Metal Chalcogenide and Halide Nanostructures (TMCN 2011) Talk given at a conference Visibility of dichalcogenide nanolayers 06.06.2011 Lausanne, Switzerland Benameur Mohamed Malik;
APS March Meeting Individual talk Electronic Devices with Dichalcogenide Nanolayers 21.03.2011 Dallas, US, United States of America Kis Andras;


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
132102 Electron microscopy of nanolayer devices 01.10.2010 Project funding
126751 Nanofabricated devices based on intrinsically layered correlated electron materials 01.12.2009 Project funding
135046 Electron Fluidics: Graphene Y-Branch Differential Logic 01.09.2011 Project funding
138237 Tailoring 2d transition metal dichalcogenides for electronic applications 01.01.2012 Project funding

Abstract

Realization of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) is the next step in the miniaturization of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have become widely accepted as optical switches, accelerometers or actuators in ink jet printers. Due to their low mass, ultralow power consumption and high sensitivity, NEMS have promising applications as highly sensitive mass, displacement, charge and energy detectors.A typical NEMS device consists of a moving beam with dimensions in the nanometer range and an associated scheme for motion detection. Various nanoscale materials such as Si or Si3N4 nanowires, carbon or boron nitride nanotubes have been used in the past as mobile beams. The newest material with this role is graphene, which is especially interesting because it is only one atomic layer thick so it represents the ultimate limit in material thickness. Incorporating graphene into NEMS requires the development of appropriate motion detection schemes. In current graphene NEMS devices, the motion of the graphene membrane is detected optically. This approach is however not practical for real-world applications as it requires aligning expensive laser-based interferometers for every device. Direct, electrical read-out schemes are more promising in this respect.Graphene is also an interesting building block for nanoscale electronics but there are several major obstacles facing its widespread adoption. One of them is the fact that graphene does not have an energy gap.In this project we will address these two problems (motion detection and lack of band gap) by applying mechanical strain to graphene nanoribbons. We will measure nanoribbon conductance changes that result from mechanical stress which is also expected to induce a band gap that can be tuned by varying the magnitude of strain. We anticipate that other layered materials such as metal dichalcogenides will receive increasing attention in future. They offer some advantages compared to graphene and we will also study electromechanical response in nanoribbons fabricated using these materials.
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