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Clausal and Nominal Complements in Monolingual and Bilingual Grammars

Type of publication Peer-reviewed
Publikationsform Editors (peer-reviewed)
Project Selection at the interfaces
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Editors (peer-reviewed)

Editor , Parafita Couto M. Carmen; , Shi Ji Young; , Ihsane Tabea
Publisher MDPI, Basel
ISBN ISSN 2226-471X

Open Access

Abstract

This Special Issue examines clausal and nominal complements in monolingual and bilingual grammars, the very topic of a recently held workshop (https://www.unige.ch/lettres/linguistique/evenements/workshop-clausal-and-nominal-complements-in-monolingual-and-bilingual-grammars/ ). Within generative grammar, it has long been assumed that language variation is due to variation in the domain of functional categories and their morpho-syntactic properties (Borer 1984, Chomsky 1995). For monolingual grammars, the left periphery of a clause has been extensively investigated, confirming the hypothesis that the functional category C(omplementizer) and its morpho-syntactic properties may be parameterized differently across languages (Rizzi 1997, Panagiotidis 2010, Saito 2010, to name a few). Assuming that clauses and nominal phrases have parallel structures, the left periphery of a nominal phrase has also been investigated to a great extent within research on monolingual grammars (Alexiadou 2014, Laenzlinger 2005, Ihsane 2008, Polletto 2014, and others). Building on the view that monolingual and bilingual grammars are subject to the same grammatical principles, recent research on the grammar of code-switching has shown that the left periphery of a particular functional category, such as C, D(eterminer), or little v, may be parameterized differently across languages. It further demonstrates that such parametrization derives patterns of code-switching, confirming the validity of the linguistic proposals put forth to account for monolingual grammars (González-Vilbazo and López 2012, Shim 2013, Parafita Couto et al. 2015). We invite papers, either theory-oriented or empirically based, which further explore clausal and nominal complements in monolingual and bilingual grammars and show how languages are encoded similarly or differently in a given domain, the very topic that generative linguistics have pursued for a long time. We welcome contributions from participants at the recently held workshop Clausal and Nominal Complements in Monolingual and Bilingual Grammars, as well as other scholars who have worked in this area.
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