Project

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Trans-synaptic signaling in GABAergic synapses (ERC-2014-StG)

English title Trans-synaptic signaling in GABAergic synapses
Applicant Földy Csaba
Number 166815
Funding scheme Temporary Backup Schemes
Research institution Institut für Hirnforschung Universität Zürich
Institution of higher education University of Zurich - ZH
Main discipline Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Start/End 01.05.2016 - 30.04.2021
Approved amount 1'618'890.00
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Keywords (3)

Synapse; Transcriptional profiling; Cell-adhesion molecules

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
This project aims to identify cell-type-specific features of neural connectivity in the brain.
Lay summary
Synapses play a key role in the brain by functionally connecting individual neurons as integrated units of pre– and postsynaptic compartments. Within the synapse, there are two principal modes of information exchange: synaptic transmission and trans–synaptic signaling. The first is electrochemical in nature, whereas the latter requires molecular interactions between pre– and postsynaptic synapse adhesion molecules. These two modes operate in parallel, but trans–synaptic signaling is critically required for synaptic transmission because it functionally couples the pre– and postsynaptic complexes. Despite its importance, trans–synaptic signaling is less well understood, because synapse–specific experimental analyses assaying both the electrophysiological and molecular properties of synapse function were previously not available. In the current proposal, I will focus on trans–synaptic interactions that define prominent physiological properties. By using a combination of cutting–edge single cell transcriptional profiling (RNAseq) and synapse–specific electrophysiology in identified GABAergic cells, our overall research aim is to decipher transcriptional information in single cells to predict the molecular physiology of synapses. Results from this project will offer novel insights into the transcriptional determinants of synapse diversity, and reveal fundamental principles of how different synapses accord with neural computations in brain circuits.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 01.03.2016

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Single-cell RNAseq reveals cell adhesion molecule profiles in electrophysiologically defined neurons
Földy Csaba, Darmanis Spyros, Aoto Jason, Malenka Robert, Quake Stephen, Südhof Thomas (2016), Single-cell RNAseq reveals cell adhesion molecule profiles in electrophysiologically defined neurons, in PNAS, 113(35), E5222.

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
170085 Physiological and molecular definition of PV interneuron synapses in the hippocampus 01.06.2017 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

Synapses play a key role in the brain by functionally connecting individual neurons as integrated units of pre- and postsynaptic compartments. Within the synapse, there are two principal modes of information exchange: synaptic transmission and trans-synaptic signaling. The first is electrochemical in nature, whereas the latter requires molecular interactions between pre- and postsynaptic synapse adhesion molecules. These two modes operate in parallel, but trans-synaptic signaling is critically required for synaptic transmission because it functionally couples the pre- and postsynaptic complexes. Despite its importance, trans-synaptic signaling is less well understood, because synapse-specific experimental analyses assaying both the electrophysiological and molecular properties of synapse function were previously not available. In the current proposal, I will focus on novel interactions of the trans-synaptic neuroligin-neurexin complex that define prominent physiological properties. By using a combination of cutting-edge single cell transcriptional profiling (RNAseq) and synapse-specific electrophysiology in identified GABAergic cells, our overall research aim is to decipher transcriptional information in single cells to predict the molecular physiology of synapses. Results from this project will offer novel insights into the transcriptional determinants of synapse diversity, and reveal fundamental principles of how different synapses accord with neural computations in brain circuits.
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