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Host-parasite interactions in hybridizing Daphnia, from correlations to experiments

English title Host-parasite interactions in hybridizing Daphnia, from correlations to experiments
Applicant Spaak Pieter
Number 166628
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Aquatische Umweltanalytik EAWAG
Institution of higher education Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology - EAWAG
Main discipline Ecology
Start/End 01.01.2017 - 31.12.2020
Approved amount 305'040.00
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All Disciplines (4)

Discipline
Ecology
Genetics
Molecular Biology
Zoology

Keywords (7)

Mesocosm Experiment; Transciptome; Long-term empirical data; Next-Generation-Sequencing; Host-Parasite interactions; Hybridization; Eutrophication

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
Eutrophierung ist ein weltweites Umweltproblem das durch die globale Erwärmung beschleunigt wird. Sie beeinträchtigt die Stabilität der aquatischen Ökosysteme und hat langfristige Konsequenzen. In diesem Forschungsprojekt untersuchen wir ob und wie die Eutrophierung zwei interagierende evolutionäre Prozesse beeinflusst: Krankheitsverbreitung und interspezifische Hybridisierung. Wir untersuchen den Einfluss der Eutrophierung auf Wirt-Parasiten-Wechselwirkungen in einem Artenkomplex von hybridisierende Wasserflöhe und auf den Hybridisierungserfolg per se. Wir verwenden Wasserflöhe (Daphnia) als hybridisierender Wirt und der Daphnia-Darmparasit „Caullerya“ als Pathogen.
Lay summary

Dieses "Lead Agency-Projekt" ist eine Zusammenarbeit zwischen einem Forschungsteam aus Deutschland (Wolinska: IGB / FU) und einem aus der Schweiz (Spaak: Eawag). Wir kombinieren Feldstudien von zwei Seen (Müggelsee, DE und Greifensee, CH) mit einem Experiment in 20 Versuchsteichen (CH). Unser Ziel ist mit molekularen Techniken die Transkriptionsprofile von den mit Stress ausgesetzten Wasserflöhen zu untersuchen (CH) sowie molekulare Markern zu entwickeln (DE) die es uns erlauben, die Evolution van Parasiten zu studieren. Zwanzig Versuchsteiche werden mit 43 Daphnia Klonen beimpft, die wir aus dem Sediment aus einem Schweizer See (Greifensee) haben schlüpfen lassen. Diese Klone repräsentieren die Wasserflöhe der letzten 60 Jahre im See. Wir werden prüfen ob Daphnia, die im Greifensee unter stark eutrophen Bedingungen lebten (1960er und 70er Jahre), besser an hohe Nährstoffbelastung angepasst sind als Klone die später unter saubereren Bedingungen im See gelebt haben.

Dieses Projekt, dass sich aus einer engen Zusammenarbeit zwischen schweizerischen und deutschen Wissenschaftsteams ergibt, wird unser Verständnis der Umweltbedienungen fördern die die evolutionären Prozesse in natürlichen Systemen antreiben.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 31.10.2016

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Using DNA from formaldehyde-preserved Daphnia to reconstruct past populations
Turko Patrick, Wolinska Justyna, Tellenbach Christoph, Dziuba Marcin Krzysztof, Monchamp Marie-Eve, Spaak Piet (2019), Using DNA from formaldehyde-preserved Daphnia to reconstruct past populations, in Hydrobiologia, 1-9.
Daphnia galeata responds to the exposure to an ichthyosporean gut parasite by down-regulation of immunity and lipid metabolism
Lu Yameng, Johnston Paul R., Dennis Stuart R., Monaghan Michael T., John Uwe, Spaak Piet, Wolinska Justyna (2018), Daphnia galeata responds to the exposure to an ichthyosporean gut parasite by down-regulation of immunity and lipid metabolism, in BMC Genomics, 19(1), 932-932.
Parasites driving host diversity: Incidence of disease correlated with Daphnia clonal turnover* RED QUEEN DYNAMICS IN DAPHNIA
Turko Patrick, Tellenbach Christoph, Keller Esther, Tardent Nadine, Keller Barbara, Spaak Piet, Wolinska Justyna (2018), Parasites driving host diversity: Incidence of disease correlated with Daphnia clonal turnover* RED QUEEN DYNAMICS IN DAPHNIA, in Evolution, 72(3), 619-629.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Dr. Manu Tammingen, Postdoc in Aquatic Ecology Department, Eawag Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Prof. John Colbourne, Chair of Environmental Genomics, University of Birmingham Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Dr. Michael Monaghan, Group Leader at the IGB Berlin Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure
Dr Hanna Hartikainen, Groupleader in Aquatic Ecology Department, Eawag Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Prof. Rita Adrian, Department Head of Ecosystem Research, IGB Berlin Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
135750 Host - parasite interactions in hybridizing Daphnia, the role of variable environments: part 2. 01.01.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)
116470 Host-parasite interactions in hybridizing Daphnia, the role of variable environments 01.08.2007 Project funding (Div. I-III)
142165 The impact of cyanobacterial blooms triggered by nutrient pollution on aquatic environments in the context of climate change 01.01.2013 Romanian-Swiss Research Programme (RSRP)
135750 Host - parasite interactions in hybridizing Daphnia, the role of variable environments: part 2. 01.01.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

1.1. Background and aims.Eutrophication is a worldwide environmental problem accelerated by global warming, af-fecting the stability of aquatic ecosystems and having long-lasting consequences. We propose to investigate, if and how eutrophication affects two interacting evolutionary processes: disease spread and interspecific hybridization. We will study the influence of eutrophication on host-parasite interactions in a hybridizing system and on hybridization success per se. We will use water fleas (Daphnia) as a hybridizing host and the ichthyosporean Caullerya as a pathogen.1.2. Approach.This “Lead Agency Project”, being a collaboration between the German (Wolinska: IGB/FU) and Swiss (Spaak: Eawag) teams, is a combination of field surveys of two lakes (Müggelsee, DE and Greifensee, CH), a large scale pond experiment (CH), the transcriptional profiling of stress-exposed Daphnia (CH), and the development and applica-tion of molecular markers (DE) that will allow us to study parasite evolution in hybridizing Daphnia. Eighteen experi-mental ponds will be inoculated with 100 Daphnia clones, which will then experience high, moderate or low trophic conditions and presence or absence of parasites. These clones were isolated from the water column of Greifensee or hatched from diapausing eggs preserved in the lake sediment, representing different ages of origin, and different spe-cies and hybrids. We will test whether Daphnia that used to live in Greifensee under highly eutrophic conditions (1960s-70s) are better adapted to high nutrient load than clones that experienced cleaner conditions later on. Then, we expect that epidemics will be greater in eutrophic ponds, because in such ponds a higher biomass of cyanobacteria is expected which seem to facilitate Caullerya infection. We aim to develop a set of polymorphic molecular markers for the parasite Caullerya, to be able to test if the parasite infects host genotypes in a strain-specific manner and if these associations are further shaped by trophic conditions. These markers will be used in the pond and in the field studies. To gain a mechanistic understanding of the previously observed correlational pattern between parasite epidemics and blooms of cyanobacteria (a by-product of eutrophication), Daphnia will be transcriptionally profiled under parasite and parasite-free conditions while in the presence or absence of cyanobacteria. Finally, using long-term field collections of Daphnia, we will verify if pathogen spread is intensified under the presence of cyanobacteria. 1.3. Expected value.The proposed research, a result of close collaboration between Swiss and German scientific teams, will advance our understanding of the environmental forces driving evolutionary processes in natural systems. The availability of two study lakes in Germany and Switzerland with long-term dataset on zooplankton dynamics and parasite infection, the new pond facility at Eawag, the sequenced D. galeata genome as well as the combination of expertise (Wolinska: host-parasite interactions and Spaak: hybridization) make this project a powerful tool for enhancing our knowledge of the consequences of eutrophication, including wildlife disease dynamics and biodiversity changes at community and population levels. The methods used in this project allow the study of past biological processes as well as testing them in contemporary experiments. Overall, through the unique combination of expertise and methods, this project will improve our understanding of disease spread and biodiversity loss under different trophic conditions and, consequently, might provide tools for management of aquatic ecosystems.
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