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Musical Repertoire in Swiss Collegiate and Monastic Churches: the Beromünster ‘Bonus ordo’ and the Einsiedeln ‘Kapellmeisterbuch’

English title Musical Repertoire in Swiss Collegiate and Monastic Churches: the Beromünster ‘Bonus ordo’ and the Einsiedeln ‘Kapellmeisterbuch’
Applicant Zoppelli Luca
Number 124416
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Dépt d'Histoire de l'art & de Musicologie Faculté des Lettres Université de Fribourg
Institution of higher education University of Fribourg - FR
Main discipline Musicology
Start/End 01.04.2009 - 31.03.2010
Approved amount 47'758.00
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Keywords (6)

Sacred music; Beromuenster; Stift; Einsiedeln; Kloster; Keywords:

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Two outstanding sources for the musical life in Swiss religious institutions are the focus of the present project. In 1696 the then provisional kapellmeister of the canon fathers of St. Michael in Beromünster, Bernhard Späni, started an inventory of the musical sources belonging to the collegiate church, the so-called ‘Bonus ordo’. The ‘kirchenmusikalische Aufzeichnungen’ (or ‘Kapellmeisterbuch’) in Einsiedeln relate as a sort of log book every single performance of music at feast-days in the Benedictine abbey church of Einsiedeln between 1805 and 1884. The existence of these two single most extensive sources on the repertoire and the liturgical use of music in Switzerland has been known to the scientific community for some time. However, no specific study has been dedicated to them, nor has any portion ever been edited.
The project foresees at first an investigation of the context of the two sources through archival work. This will be followed by the transcription of the two manuscripts. On the basis of the collected data, the research team will proceed to a study of the repertoire and of its transmission. The results will be published in two cross-indexed, web-based documents.
For more than a hundred years the Institute for musicology of Fribourg University has been a world-famous centre for research in the field of Catholic sacred music. This important tradition has been recently emphasized with the research project “Musique des monastères suisses / Musik in Schweizer Klöstern” (SNF-project no. 109657). The present project, though it pertains to the same field of studies, focuses instead not on the musical text, but on the context for the use of music in two important Swiss religious institutions.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
139521 Répertoire International des Sources Musicales (RISM) - Arbeitsstelle Schweiz des RISM 01.01.2012 Research Infrastructure
131767 Printed Sacred Music in Europe, 1500-1800: Switzerland and the Alpine Region as Crossroads of Production, Circulation and Reception of Catholic Musical Repertoire 01.10.2010 Project funding (Div. I-III)
153683 Musikalische Inventare: Internationale Tagung & Workshop 01.08.2014 International Exploratory Workshops
122191 Musique des Monastères Suisses - Musik aus Schweizer Klöstern 01.10.2008 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

Two outstanding sources for the musical life in Swiss religious institutions are the focus of the present project. In 1696, the then provisional Kapellmeister of the canon fathers of St. Michael in Beromu¨nster, Bernhard Spa¨ni, started an inventory of the musical sources belonging to the collegiate church, the so-called ‘Bonus ordo’. The ‘kirchenmusikalische Aufzeichnungen’ (or ‘Kapellmeisterbuch’) in Einsiedeln are a sort of log book relating every single performance of music at feast-days in the Benedictine abbey church of Einsiedeln between 1805 and 1884. The existence of these two single most extensive sources on the repertoire and the liturgical use of music in Switzerland has been known to the scientific community for some time (at least since Bruggisser 2002 and Hanke Knaus 2004). However, no specific study has been dedicated to them, nor has any portion ever been edited. The planned investigation shall provide a substantial contribution to a very lively field of studies, which has only recently developed due to the commitment of the Institute of Musicology of Fribourg University. The seminal Congress of the Swiss musicological society (SMG) in Fribourg in November 2007 (“Musiques des monaste`res de la region alpine - Musik aus Klo¨stern des Alpenraums”) provided the inspiration for this project and has laid the foundation for a new interpretation of the data concerning Swiss sacred musical life from 1650 to 1850. Sacred music in this period was in fact quite different in Switzerland from that in other Alpine regions. The specific character of the Swiss repertoire derives from its privileged ties to Milan. These were laid with the foundation by St Carlo Borromeo of the partly Jesuit-led Collegium Helveticum in this Italian city (1579). The institution of the Benedictine residence of Bellinzona as an outpost of the Einsiedeln monastery in 1675 strengthened these ties, but Bellinzona itself was only a stepping stone and not the main centre of Milanese music in Switzerland. The study of the Beromu¨nster inventory and the Einsiedeln log book shall confirm and provide further proof of this interpretation. Besides the relevance to Swiss studies, the two sources are of international relevance. The Beromu¨nster inventory is a document for a lost repertoire, as almost no sources from the 17th century survived in Beromu¨nster and of many listed works there is no record at all outside the inventory. Spa¨ni’s catalogue provides thus a unique resource for musicologists worldwide in the identification of lost music, especially prints (on the question of lost prints see e.g. Collarile 2007). Most of the music referred to in the ‘Kapellmeisterbuch’ is instead still preserved in Einsiedeln. The identification of the entries with existing manuscripts provides an opportunity to study the relationship between music and liturgy in a context whose uninterrupted tradition stemmed at least from the mid-18th century and which was not touched by the German reform movements for sacred music until the 1860s. The current negative image of 19th century sacred music - not to say, ignorance - is still unconsciously dominated by those reform movements, and urgently needs a correction. The reform movements first (e.g. Caecilianism), and the second Vatican council later, completely erased even the memory of the liturgical use of music in a contemporary style. Writing church music in the most modern style for the composer’s own epoch had always been a self-evident choice, and had an unbroken tradition from the upcoming of the ‘concerted’ style shortly after 1600 until about 1860. However, today the majority of this repertoire is practically banned not only in church service, but also in scientific circles and in concert life. The first step in the rehabilitation of the sacred music repertoire of the late 18th and early 19th century is an unbiased view on the music actually used in church, as will be shown in the present study. Methodologically, the project foresees at first an investigation of the context of the two sources through archival work. This is followed by the transcription of the two manuscripts. On the basis of the collected data, the research team shall proceed to a study of the repertoire and of its transmission. The results shall be published in two cross-indexed, Web-based documents.For more than 100 years, the Institute of Musicology at the University of Fribourg has been a world-famous centre for research in the field of Catholic sacred music. This important tradition has recently been revived with the research projects “Musique des monaste`res suisses / Musik in Schweizer Klo¨stern” (SNF-project no. 109657 and 122191) focussing on the edition of unique or little-known musical sources. The present project, though it pertains to the same field of studies, focuses instead not on the musical text, but on the context for the use of music in two important Swiss religious institutions. The Institute of Musicology’s commitment to excellence in this field guarantees full institutional support to the present project. The national and international networking (Swiss RISM office, Berne; Fondazione Cini, Venice) provides a platform for its valorisation on a national and international basis.
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