Project

Back to overview

Regime design and international cooperation: The role of differential treatment in multilateral environmental agreements

Applicant Castro Pareja Paula Monica
Number 171273
Funding scheme Marie Heim-Voegtlin grants
Research institution Institut für Politikwissenschaft Universität Zürich
Institution of higher education University of Zurich - ZH
Main discipline Political science
Start/End 01.03.2017 - 30.06.2019
Approved amount 219'088.00
Show all

All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Political science
Economics
Other disciplines of Environmental Sciences

Keywords (5)

Environmental politics; Regime design; Cooperation; International relations; Governance

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
Viele internationale Umweltabkommen haben das Prinzip der differenzierten Behandlung ihrer Mitgliedstaaten eingeführt. Damit wird versucht, die Unterschiede in (technischer und finanzieller) Kapazität sowie in Verantwortung für das respektive Umweltproblem auszugleichen. Diese differenzierte Behandlung kann zum Beispiel aus weniger stringenten Verpflichtungen für bestimmte Ländergruppen, oder mehr Zeit für die Erfüllung der Verpflichtung, oder technischer und finanzieller Unterstützung bestehen.
Lay summary

Inhalt und Ziel des Forschungsprojekts 

Obwohl diese differenzierte Behandlung Mitgliedstaaten schon mehrmals von internationalen Juristen untersucht worden ist, wurde sie bei den internationalen Beziehungen bisher weitgehend übersehen. Anekdotische Evidenz zeigt jedoch, dass die differenzierte Behandlung substantielle Effekte auf der internationalen Kooperation haben kann.

Ziel dieses Projekts ist es also zu analysieren, (1) wie das spezifische Design der differenzierten Behandlung Mitgliedstaaten bei unterschiedlichen internationalen Umweltabkommen verabschiedet worden ist, und (2), ob und wie verschiedene Arten von differenzierter Behandlung die langfristige Kooperation zwischen Mitgliedern jener Umweltabkommen beeinflusst hat. Um diese Fragen zu beantworten wird eine Mischung aus qualitativen Fallstudien und aus quantitativem statistischen Analysen durchgeführt, unterstützt durch einer textbasierten Datensammlung.

 

Wissenschaftlicher und gesellschaftlicher Kontext

Das Projekt stellt einen wesentlichen Beitrag für die institutionelle internationale Beziehungen Literatur dar, sowohl durch die neuen theoretischen Ideen zu den Effekten von institutionellem Design auf internationaler Kooperation, wie auch durch der breiten Datensammlung und der methodologischen Vielfalt. Es wird zudem praktische Lösungsansätze für das Design zukünftiger internationaler Abkommen vorschlagen, vor allem im Bezug auf die Lastenverteilung bei komplexen multilateralen Kooperationsproblemen.  

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 20.12.2016

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Past and future of burden sharing in the climate regime: positions and ambition from a top-down to a bottom-up governance system
Castro Paula (2020), Past and future of burden sharing in the climate regime: positions and ambition from a top-down to a bottom-up governance system, in International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, 1.
Conditional nationally determined contributions in the Paris Agreement: foothold for equity or Achilles heel?
Pauw W. Pieter, Castro Paula, Pickering Jonathan, Bhasin Shikha (2019), Conditional nationally determined contributions in the Paris Agreement: foothold for equity or Achilles heel?, in Climate Policy, 1-17.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
University of Canberra Australia (Oceania)
- Publication
Centre de Recherches Internationales, Sciences Po France (Europe)
- Publication
Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW) India (Asia)
- Publication
Fachbereich Politikwissenschaft, Universität Basel Switzerland (Europe)
- Publication
Department of Political Science, University of St. Gallen Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Frankfurt School of Finance and Management Germany (Europe)
- Publication
Oeschger Centre for Climate Research (OcCC), University of Bern Switzerland (Europe)
- Publication

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
ECPR Joint Sessions Workshop "Networked Environmental Governance" Talk given at a conference It is not as bad as it looks: Comparing countries’ cooperation on climate change inside and outside the UNFCCC negotiations 08.04.2019 Mons, Belgium Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
2018 Utrecht Conference on Earth System Governance Talk given at a conference Fragmentation in the Climate Change Negotiations: Taking Stock of the Evolving Coalition Dynamics 05.11.2018 Utrecht, Netherlands Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
Research Seminar in Political Science Individual talk The politicization of the climate: How and why has the Annex I – non-Annex I division affected negotiations under the climate change regime? 18.09.2018 St. Gallen, Switzerland Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
ECPR General Conference 2018 Talk given at a conference The politicization of the climate: How and why has the Annex I – non-Annex I division affected negotiations under the climate change regime? 22.08.2018 Hamburg, Germany Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
Advanced Social Networks Analysis Seminar Individual talk The politicization of the climate: how and why has the Annex I - non-Annex I division affected negotiations under the climate change regime? 30.10.2017 EAWAG, Zurich, Switzerland Castro Pareja Paula Monica;


Knowledge transfer events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Date Place Persons involved
Side Event: "Developing countries’ NDCs: lessons learned for increasing transparency, ambition, and ownership" Talk 26.06.2019 Bonn, Germany Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
Lecture on "International Climate Policy" at course on "Introduction to Sustainability" Talk 12.11.2018 Zurich, Switzerland Castro Pareja Paula Monica;
Lecture on "The Politicization of the Climate" at BA seminar on "Climate Change Negotiations and Finance" Talk 29.05.2018 University of Zurich, Switzerland Castro Pareja Paula Monica;


Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Talks/events/exhibitions Conditional NDCs in the Paris Agreement: Foothold for equity or Achilles Heel? International 2019

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
143539 Institutional design and 'constructed peer groups' in international organizations: The case of the international climate change regime 01.10.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

With this project, I aim at finalizing my Habilitation by complementing and bringing to conclusion my research agenda on the design and effects of differential treatment in multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs). Differential treatment is relatively common feature of MEAs, aimed at addressing countries’ different circumstances and levels of contribution to environmental degradation. It usually consists of granting a specific group of countries less stringent obligations, different time schedules for compliance, and international financial, technological or capacity building support. While differential treatment has long been studied by international law scholars, the international relations literature has so far failed to systematically investigate the potential effects of differential treatment on international cooperation. I thus analyse (1), how the specific design of differential treatment across MEAs was decided upon, and (2), how different types of differential treatment have affected long-term cooperation among parties to those MEAs. To answer these questions, I use a mix of qualitative case studies and quantitative statistical analysis, both supported by a strong data collection effort based on text analysis tools. I have already worked on six papers that are in different stages of development. During the grant, my specific aims are (1) to add an analytical case study to the project, which would allow me to solve an empirical problem related to the endogeneity of treaty design on the structure of the cooperation problem being addressed, (2) to revise those papers that are still in a preliminary stage, and (3) to publish some of the papers in high-ranked journals within my field of work and the whole projects as a book in a highly reputed academic publisher. I believe that this project can make significant contributions both in practice and academically. Academically, I expect to help moving forward the institutionalist international relations literature, both with new theoretical insights and improved methodological tools. In practical terms, in a world of unequal peers, there is a need to understand how to best deal with the distributional implications of complex multilateral cooperation problems. This study will allow learning useful lessons for the design of future intergovernmental agreements, both within and outside the environmental area.
-