Project

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Optical Imaging of Cortical Motor Control

English title Optical Imaging of Cortical Motor Control
Applicant Huber Daniel
Number 163762
Funding scheme SNSF Professorships
Research institution Dépt des Neurosciences Fondamentales Faculté de Médecine Université de Genève
Institution of higher education University of Geneva - GE
Main discipline Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Start/End 01.01.2016 - 31.12.2017
Approved amount 480'596.00
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Keywords (1)

motor cortex, imaging, mouse behavior

Lay Summary (German)

Lead
Optical Imaging of Cortical Motor Control
Lay summary
Whether it is for tying one’s shoe laces or exploring the iPhone, we need to continuously practice new movements and acquire novel motor skills. Motor cortex is one of the key brain areas participating in coordinating and learning of such voluntary movements. Despite decades of research this brain area remains poorly understood. The general aim of this project is to use a series of innovative optical imaging methods, such as in vivo two-photon microscopy, to record neuronal activity in the motor cortex with single cell resolution and thereby gain a better understanding of the exact neuronal network dynamics underlying motor control and skill learning. We will use mice as model system since they are great manipulators and give access to a wide variety of important molecular tools and to well established models motor diseases. These experiments in rodents will ultimately help us to understand some of the basic neuronal mechanisms that govern our own actions, enabling us to solve new challenges.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 18.11.2015

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Directional Reaching for Water as a Cortex-Dependent Behavioral Framework for Mice
Galiñanes Gregorio Luis, Bonardi Claudia, Huber Daniel (2018), Directional Reaching for Water as a Cortex-Dependent Behavioral Framework for Mice, in Cell Reports, 22(10), 2767-2783.
Pupil Size Coupling to Cortical States Protects the Stability of Deep Sleep via Parasympathetic Modulation
Yüzgeç Ozge, Prsa Mario, Zimmermann Robert, Huber Daniel (2018), Pupil Size Coupling to Cortical States Protects the Stability of Deep Sleep via Parasympathetic Modulation, in Current Biology, 28(3), 392-400.
Rapid Integration of Artificial Sensory Feedback during Operant Conditioning of Motor Cortex Neurons
Prsa Mario, Galinanes Gregorio, Huber Daniel (2017), Rapid Integration of Artificial Sensory Feedback during Operant Conditioning of Motor Cortex Neurons, in Neuron, 93(4), 929-939.
The role of forelimb motor cortex areas in goal directed action in mice
Morandell Karin, Huber Daniel (2017), The role of forelimb motor cortex areas in goal directed action in mice, in Scientific Reports, 7, 15759.

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
184829 Dissecting the neuronal circuit mechanisms underlying neuroprosthetic learning 01.06.2019 Project funding (Div. I-III)
117485 Cortical mechanisms of somatosensory perception probed with channelrhodopsin-2 assisted microstimulation 01.07.2007 Fellowships for advanced researchers
133710 Optical Imaging of Cortical Motor Control 01.01.2012 SNSF Professorships

Abstract

The main goal of this two year extension is to complement and complete the initially proposed research plan and finalize the doctoral theses of the involved PhD students. We will continue our efforts to gain a better understanding of the network dynamics underlying motor control and skill learning, by using in vivo two-photon imaging in the mouse frontal cortex in combination with quantitative behavioral testing. The mapping of activity over large regions, but with single-cell resolution, will allow us to test the hypothesis that specific movements are represented by broad, intermingled and flexible networks whose rapid rearrangement underlie the learning of novel motor skills. These experiments in rodents will ultimately help us to understand some of the basic neuronal mechanisms that govern our own actions, enabling us to solve new challenges.
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