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Early solar system history and delivery of matter to Earth studied with noble gases in extraterrestrial material

English title Early solar system history and delivery of matter to Earth studied with noble gases in extraterrestrial material
Applicant Schönbächler Maria
Number 143950
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Institut für Geochemie und Petrologie ETH Zürich
Institution of higher education ETH Zurich - ETHZ
Main discipline Geochemistry
Start/End 01.10.2012 - 29.02.2016
Approved amount 206'161.00
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Keywords (5)

fossil meteorites; Noble gases; extraterrestrial material flux; Meteorites; asteroid impacts

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Marine Sediments from the Mid_Ordovician period (about 470 Ma before the present) in various locations worldwide contain chromite grains of extraterrestrial origin. In a limestone quarry in Sweden, such sediments even contain entire fossilized meteorites, in which also the original chromite minerals are preserved, whereas all the other minerals have been replaced. The very high concentration of extraterrestrial material in 470 Ma old layers testifies of a major break-up event in the asteroid belt due to a major collision between two asteroids. The chromites from the fossil meteorites retain noble gases which were produced when the meteorites were on their way to the Earth. These noble gases allowed us to deduce that the first meteorites arrived very quickly, i. e. less than a few hundred thousand years after the collision. The single chromite grains, on the other hand, very delivered as micrometeoritic dust grains, because they all contain noble gases implanted by the solar wind. We will now extend these studies in space, time and scope. We plan to study fossilized meteorites from different sediment layers, as well as dispersed crhomite grains from other Mid_ordovician sediments. We also intend to analyse chromite grains deposited at several major geological boundaries, with the ultimate goal to study the potential influence of impacts on the biosphere.   
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Cosmic-ray exposure ages of six chondritic Almahata Sitta fragments
Riebe M. E. I., Welten K. C., Meier M. M. M., Wieler R., Barth M. I. F., Ward D., Laubenstein M., Bischoff A., Caffee M. W., Nishiizumi K., Busemann H. (2017), Cosmic-ray exposure ages of six chondritic Almahata Sitta fragments, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 2353-2374.
Cosmogenic He and Ne in chondrules from clastic matrix and a lithic clast of Murchison: No pre-irradiation by the early sun
Riebe My E.I., Huber Liliane, Metzler Knut, Busemann Henner, Luginbuehl Stefanie M., Meier Matthias M.M., Maden Colin, Wieler Rainer (2017), Cosmogenic He and Ne in chondrules from clastic matrix and a lithic clast of Murchison: No pre-irradiation by the early sun, in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 213, 618-634.
Closed System Step Etching of CI chondrite Ivuna reveals primordial noble gases in the HF-solubles
Riebe My E.I., Busemann Henner, Wieler Rainer, Maden Colin (2017), Closed System Step Etching of CI chondrite Ivuna reveals primordial noble gases in the HF-solubles, in Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 205, 65-83.
Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812-Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites
Wieler R., Huber L., Busemann H., Seiler S., Leya I., Maden C., Masarik J., Meier M. M. M., Nagao K., Trappitsch R., Irving A. J. (2016), Noble gases in 18 Martian meteorites and angrite Northwest Africa 7812-Exposure ages, trapped gases, and a re-evaluation of the evidence for solar cosmic ray-produced neon in shergottites and other achondrites, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 51(2), 407-428.
Cosmic-ray exposure ages of pallasites
Herzog G. F., Cook D. L., Cosarinsky M., Huber L., Leya I., Park J. (2015), Cosmic-ray exposure ages of pallasites, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 50(1), 86-111.
The Vicência meteorite fall: A new unshocked (S1) weakly metamorphosed (3.2) LL chondrite
Keil Klaus, Zucolotto Maria E., Krot Alexander N., Doyle Patricia M., Telus Myriam, Krot Tatiana V., Greenwood Richard C., Franchi Ian A., Wasson John T., Welten Kees C., Caffee Marc W., Sears Derek W. G., Riebe My, Wieler Rainer, dos Santos Edivaldo, Scorzelli Rosa B., Gattacceca Jerome, Lagroix France, Laubenstein Matthias, Mendes Julio C., Schmitt-Kopplin Philippe, Harir Mourad, Moutinho Andre L. R. (2015), The Vicência meteorite fall: A new unshocked (S1) weakly metamorphosed (3.2) LL chondrite, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 50(6), 1089-1111.
The Ardón L6 ordinary chondrite: A long-hidden Spanish meteorite fall
Trigo-Rodríguez Josep M., Llorca Jordi, Weyrauch Mona, Bischoff Addi, Moyano-Cambero Carles E., Keil Klaus, Laubenstein Matthias, Pack Andreas, Madiedo José María, Alonso-Azcárate Jacinto, Riebe My, Wieler Rainer, Ott Uli, Tapia Mar, Mestres Narcís (2014), The Ardón L6 ordinary chondrite: A long-hidden Spanish meteorite fall, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 49(8), 1475-1484.
Comment on “Cosmogenic neon in grains separated from individual chondrules: Evidence of precompaction exposure in chondrules” by J. P. Das, J. N. Goswami, O. V. Pravdivtseva, A. P. Meshik, and C. M. Hohenberg
Ott U., Wieler R., Huber L. (2013), Comment on “Cosmogenic neon in grains separated from individual chondrules: Evidence of precompaction exposure in chondrules” by J. P. Das, J. N. Goswami, O. V. Pravdivtseva, A. P. Meshik, and C. M. Hohenberg, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 48(8), 1524-1528.
Light noble gases in 12 meteorites from the Omani desert, Australia, Mauritania, Canada, and Sweden
Leya I., Ammon K., Cosarinsky M., Dalcher N., Gnos E., Hofmann B., Huber L. (2013), Light noble gases in 12 meteorites from the Omani desert, Australia, Mauritania, Canada, and Sweden, in Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 48(8), 1401-1414.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Dr. C. M. O'D. Alexander, Smithsonian Inst. Washington DC United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Dr. N. Vogel, eawag Dübendorf Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Dr. K. Metzler, Univ. Münster Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Awards

Title Year
Award of the Meteoritical Society for best oral presentation at its Annual meeting 2015 in Berkeley, USA 2015

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
126460 High energy particle irradiation in the early solar system and stellar nucleosynthesis studied with noble gases in primitive meteorites 01.10.2009 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

We propose a research program along four lines: i) Energetic particles from the early active sun - is there a record in meteorites?Young stars often emit large fluxes of energetic particles. It would be very important to find direct evidence that this also happened with the early sun. Several previous claims of a record of an early solar energetic particle irradiation in meteorites remain controversial. We are looking for the presence or absence of such evidence by a more sophisticated approach, i. e. by measuring noble gases produced by energetic particles in high-temperature objects in meteorites (chondrules and refractory inclusions). A careful sample selection and characterisation will allow us to distinguish noble gases acquired during an early exposure to energetic particles prior to meteorite compaction - if present - from the products of a later irradiation of the meteorite. ii) Primordial noble gases in primitive meteoritesPrimordial noble gases in meteorites were incorporated during the earliest stages of the solar system. Meteoritic noble gases are crucial for our understanding of the volatile elements in the solar system, the formation and early evolution of planetary building blocks, and ultimately also terrestrial and giant planets. Here we plan a) the first complete characterization of the noble gases in a CI chondrite by online etching, b) to study the effect of aqueous alteration on noble gas carriers in the particulalry primitive chondrite Tagish Lake and c) to search for isotopic heterogeneity in chondrites inherited from the early solar system by combining Kr and Xe data from online etching studies of a primitive meteorite with previously obtained isotopic data showing nucleosynthetic anomalies on other elements (e. g. Zr) in leachate fractions from the same meteorite. iii) Indigenous noble gases in lunar rocks - how volatile-poor is the Moon really?The Moon is the most volatile-depleted planetary sized body known and until a few years ago the lunar interior has been thought to be completely devoid of water. New analyses changed this picture, however, as they revealed sizeable amounts of water in lunar rocks. So far also no indigenous noble gases in lunar rocks have been unambiguously detected, but the respective analyses stem from the early days of lunar sample studies. In view of the renewed interest in lunar water and lunar volatiles in general, we plan to revisit the question of indigenous noble gases in suitable lunar samples with state of the art gas extraction and analysis techniques. iv) Meteorites and micrometeorites in terrestrial sediments - the noble gas recordMid-Ordovician sediments in several parts of the world have been found to contain dispersed extraterrestrial chromite grains, and partly even fossilized meteorites. These are the result of the largest known collision in the asteroid belt. With our ultrasensitive noble gas mass spectrometer we showed that most individual Ordovician chromite grains were delivered as micrometeorites and these data also yielded other important insights into the delivery mechanisms of meteorites and micrometeorites. Here we propose to extend such investigations in space, time, and scope. We plan to study fossilized meteorites from different sediment layers, as well as dispersed chromite grains from other Mid-Ordovician sediments, e. g. from Russia. We also intend to analyse chromite grains deposited at several major geological boundaries, with the ultimate goal to study the potential influence of impacts on the biosphere. Finally we will search for material from the Moon brought to Earth in the aftermath of large impacts.
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