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Exploiting Equilibrium Forces for Computer Networks Operations (Extension)

Gesuchsteller/in Tschudin Christian
Nummer 143590
Förderungsinstrument Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)
Forschungseinrichtung Fachbereich Informatik Departement Mathematik und Informatik Universität Basel
Hochschule Universität Basel – BS
Hauptdisziplin Informatik
Beginn/Ende 01.10.2012 - 30.09.2014
Bewilligter Betrag 168'186.00
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Keywords (4)

network architecture; computer networks; self-optimizing network operations; chemical networking protocols

Lay Summary (Englisch)

Lead
Lay summary

Today it is very easy for an attacker to harm a remote network server essentially for free. The amount of resources needed locally by an attacker has no relation with the mobilized attack forces. We would like to invent an Internet physics that couples tighter cause and effect. That is, if a remote server should experience some force or pressure, this pressure has to be generated locally in a first place. Only by investing local energy or by doing local work should an entity be able to afflict the remote place with some action. That is, the Internet has to conserve virtual energy and impose some mechanics law across distance.

In this research project we propose to design and study run-time environments for networking protocols which inherently enforce desirable global dynamics. As a first target objective we look at TCP-unfriendly traffic. One approach is bottom up and is based on an artificial physics engine. The second approach is more top-down and envisages generic controllers which can switch among implementation alternatives to find optimal operation configurations. These two approaches are complementary and should be coupled. Common to both approaches is that we cast overall system goals as equilibria: Ideally, the forces which steer a system to its optimal point of operation shall be an intrinsic part of the run-time system and should not have to be (re-) implemented in each protocol again.

In this extension phase of the project we continue to use artificial evolution to let a communication system find optimal configurations (where undesirable behavior can be negatively rewarded) - a prototype is currently under development. In parallel and using analytical and simulation methodologies, novel media access protocols (e.g. access in wireless networks) are explored that show "physics-like" properties.

Direktlink auf Lay Summary Letzte Aktualisierung: 21.02.2013

Verantw. Gesuchsteller/in und weitere Gesuchstellende

Mitarbeitende

Verbundene Projekte

Nummer Titel Start Förderungsinstrument
130121 Self-healing Protocols (Abschluss) 01.04.2010 Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)
132525 Exploiting Equilibrium Forces for Computer Networks Operations 01.10.2010 Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)

Abstract

The stability of computer network algorithms is as important as themain functional purpose of networking software. This is well knowne.g. from the Transmission Control Protocol: Recovering from lostpackets alone would not help much if TCP would not also take care ofavoiding overloading the network with packet (re-)transmissions. However, such a combined functional as well as overallstability design of networking protocols is hard to achieve with theclassical finite state machine modeling of reactive systems.In this research project we propose to design and study run-timeenvironments for networking protocols which inherently enforce desirableglobal dynamics. One approach is bottom up and is based on a chemicallyinspired way of running protocols as reaction chains under a specificscheduling policy. The second approach is more top-down and envisagesgeneric controllers which can switch among implementation alternativesto find optimal operation configurations. We see these two approaches asbeing complementary and see a need to also understand how thecorresponding run-time environments must be coupled. Common to bothapproaches is that we cast overall system goals as equilibria: Ideally,the forces which steer a system to its optimal operation point shall bean intrinsic part of the run-time system and should not have to be\mbox{(re-)} implemented in each protocol again.We will explore this path both theoretically as well as with practicalimplementation. As a use case, we develop and implement a content centricnetwork stack with both approaches (bottom-up, top-down, andpossibly combined), and show their strengths and weaknesses.
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