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Interaction within and between specialised cortical networks

English title Interaction within and between specialised cortical networks
Applicant Clarke Stéphanie
Number 141177
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Division de Neuropsychologie CHUV
Institution of higher education University of Lausanne - LA
Main discipline Neurology, Psychiatry
Start/End 01.04.2012 - 31.03.2015
Approved amount 755'000.00
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Keywords (5)

neurorehabilitation; cognitive neuroscience; neuropsychology; auditory processing; neural plasticity

Lay Summary (French)

Lead
Interactions within and between specialised cortical networksOrganisation du cortex cérébral humain : comment se construisent les réseaux spécialisés ?
Lay summary

Le modèle des deux voies du traitement de l’information auditive, établi sur la base des travaux anatomiques et fonctionnels de la dernière décennie, décrit la dichotomie entre le traitement menant à la reconnaissance auditive et celui soutenant la localisation des sons. Les deux réseaux impliqués sont anatomiquement distincts, celui de la reconnaissance auditive impliquant la convexité temporale et celui de la localisation des sons s’étendant sur la convexité pariéto-frontale. Dans le contexte de ce modèle, plusieurs questions s’imposent :

- comment de nouvelles représentations sémantiques sont-elles créées ?

- quel(s) lien(s) y-a-t’il entre les deux voies lorsque les caractéristiques sémantiques et spatiales d’un objet sonore doivent être retenues simultanément ?

- comment la collaboration entre les deux voies est-elle influencée par l’apprentissage ?

Notre projet explore ces questions en utilisant des techniques d’imagerie cérébrale fonctionnelle (fMRI 7T et 3T, neuro-imagerie électrique) et anatomique (connectivité anatomique et fonctionnelle). Ces questions sont d’une importance conceptuelle lorsqu’elles sont investiguées chez des sujets normaux. Un impact clinique indéniable, surtout dans le domaine de la neuroréhabilitation, est attendu lors de l’élargissement de ces travaux chez des patients cérébro-lésés.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 09.01.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
From bird to sparrow: Learning-induced modulations in fine-grained semantic discrimination
De Meo R., Bourquin N. M. P., Knebel J. F., Murray M. M., Clarke S. (2015), From bird to sparrow: Learning-induced modulations in fine-grained semantic discrimination, in Neuroimage, 118, 163-173.
Impact of Cognitive Neuroscience on Stroke Rehabilitation
Clarke Stephanie, Bindschaedler Claire, Crottaz-Herbette Sonia (2015), Impact of Cognitive Neuroscience on Stroke Rehabilitation, in Stroke, 46(5), 1408-1413.
Intrahemispheric cortico-cortical connections of the human auditory cortex
Cammoun L., Thiran J. P., Griffa A., Meuli R., Hagmann P., Clarke S. (2015), Intrahemispheric cortico-cortical connections of the human auditory cortex, in Brain Structure & Function, 220(6), 3537-3553.
Representation of Sound Objects within Early-Stage Auditory Areas: A Repetition Effect Study Using 7T fMRI
Da Costa S., Bourquin N. M. P., Knebel J. F., Saenz M., Van der Zwaag W., Clarke S. (2015), Representation of Sound Objects within Early-Stage Auditory Areas: A Repetition Effect Study Using 7T fMRI, in Plos One, 10(5), 19-19.
Roaring lions and chirruping lemurs: How the brain encodes sound objects in space
Clarke Stephanie, Geiser Eveline (2015), Roaring lions and chirruping lemurs: How the brain encodes sound objects in space, in Neuropsychologia, 75, 304-313.
Tonotopic Gradients in Human Primary Auditory Cortex: Concurring Evidence From High-Resolution 7 T and 3 T fMRI
Da Costa Sandra, Saenz Melissa, Clarke Stephanie, van der Zwaag Wietske (2015), Tonotopic Gradients in Human Primary Auditory Cortex: Concurring Evidence From High-Resolution 7 T and 3 T fMRI, in Brain Topography, 28(1), 66-69.
Top-down control and early multisensory processes: chicken vs. egg
De Meo Rosanna, Murray Micah M., Clarke Stephanie, Matusz Pawel J. (2015), Top-down control and early multisensory processes: chicken vs. egg, in Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 9, 17.
Prismatic Adaptation Changes Visuospatial Representation in the Inferior Parietal Lobule
Crottaz-Herbette Sonia, Fornari Eleonora, Clarke Stephanie (2014), Prismatic Adaptation Changes Visuospatial Representation in the Inferior Parietal Lobule, in Journal of Neuroscience, 34(35), 11803-11811.
Demyelination in Mild Cognitive Impairment Suggests Progression Path to Alzheimer's Disease
Carmeli Cristian, Donati Alessia, Antille Valerie, Viceic Dragana, Ghika Joseph, von Gunten Armin, Clarke Stephanie, Meuli Reto, Frackowiak Richard S., Knyazeva Maria G. (2013), Demyelination in Mild Cognitive Impairment Suggests Progression Path to Alzheimer's Disease, in Plos One, 8(8), 8.
Inter- and Intrahemispheric Dissociations in Ideomotor Apraxia: A Large-Scale LesionSymptom Mapping Study in Subacute Brain-Damaged Patients
Manuel Aurelie L., Radman Narges, Mesot Delphine, Chouiter Leila, Clarke Stephanie, Annoni Jean-Marie, Spierer Lucas (2013), Inter- and Intrahemispheric Dissociations in Ideomotor Apraxia: A Large-Scale LesionSymptom Mapping Study in Subacute Brain-Damaged Patients, in Cerebral Cortex, 23(12), 2781-2789.
Location-independent and location-linked representations of sound objects
Bourquin Nathalie M. -P., Murray Micah M., Clarke Stephanie (2013), Location-independent and location-linked representations of sound objects, in Neuroimage, 73, 40-49.
Repetition-Induced Plasticity of Motor Representations of Action Sounds
Bourquin Nathalie M. -P., Simonin Alexandre, Clarke Stephanie (2013), Repetition-Induced Plasticity of Motor Representations of Action Sounds, in Brain Topography, 26(1), 152-156.
Tuning In to Sound: Frequency-Selective Attentional Filter in Human Primary Auditory Cortex
Da Costa Sandra, van der Zwaag Wietske, Miller Lee M., Clarke Stephanie, Saenz Melissa (2013), Tuning In to Sound: Frequency-Selective Attentional Filter in Human Primary Auditory Cortex, in Journal of Neuroscience, 33(5), 1858-1863.
Auditory spatial deficits following hemispheric lesions: Dissociation of explicit and implicit processing
Duffour-Nikolov Catherine, Tardif Eric, Maeder Philippe, Thiran Anne Bellmann, Bloch Jocelyne, Frischknecht Rolf, Clarke Stephanie (2012), Auditory spatial deficits following hemispheric lesions: Dissociation of explicit and implicit processing, in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 22(5), 674-696.
Cognitive Efficacy of Quetiapine in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis: A 12-Week Open Label Trial
Urben Sebastien, Baumann Pierre, Barcellona Sandra, Hafil Muriel, Preuss Ulrich, Peter-Favre Claire, Clarke Stephanie, Halfon Olivier, Holzer Laurent (2012), Cognitive Efficacy of Quetiapine in Early-Onset First-Episode Psychosis: A 12-Week Open Label Trial, in Psychiatric Quarterly, 83(3), 311-324.
Neural plasticity associated with recently versus often heard objects
Bourquin Nathalie M. -P., Spierer Lucas, Murray Micah M., Clarke Stephanie (2012), Neural plasticity associated with recently versus often heard objects, in Neuroimage, 62(3), 1800-1806.
Nineteenth century research on cell death.
Clarke P G H, Clarke S (2012), Nineteenth century research on cell death., in Experimental oncology, 34(3), 139-45.

Scientific events



Self-organised

Title Date Place
9th Worldcongress for Neurorehabilitation 10.05.2016 Philadelphia, United States of America
8th World Congress for Neurorehabilitation 08.04.2014 Istanbul, Turkey
9th ORPHEUS Conference 03.04.2014 Lausanne, Switzerland
4th International Conference on Auditory Cortex 31.08.2013 Lausanne, Switzerland

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
124897 Interactions within and between specialised cortical networks: postlesional plasticity and the underlying connectivity 01.04.2009 Project funding (Div. I-III)
159708 Sound objects in space and time 01.04.2015 Project funding (Div. I-III)
150828 Development of Advanced Translational High-Field MRI 12.05.2014 R'EQUIP

Abstract

Established during the last decade on the basis of electrophysiological and anatomical studies in non-human primates and activation and lesion studies in humans, the dual-pathway model of auditory processing gives an understanding to the highly efficient way auditory stimuli are processed at cortical level. In this context several issues are currently of high interest: i) the way new semantic representations are created; ii) the nature of the link between semantic and spatial aspects of a specific sound object; iii) the influence of spatial cues on the processing of non-verbal, non-musical auditory emotional information through the ventral and dorsal pathway; and iv) the contribution of early-stage auditory areas to coding objects and their role in learning-induced plasticity. We will address them in EEG and fMRI (including 7T) paradigms in normal subjects.The finely tuned networks which underlie auditory processing in normal subjects are most likely subject to major changes following brain lesions, as suggested by previous human and non-human studies (including our own). This is most likely even more true for learning-induced plasticity, which may recruit different networks in brain-damaged patients than in normal subjects. During the grant period we will use comparable short- and long-term paradigms in both groups and assess plasticity related to recognition or spatial discrimination training.Our specific aims are:i)Determine how learning-induced plasticity influences coding within auditory semantic and auditory spatial representations; compare effects of short (half-day) and long training (4 consecutive days).ii)Determine whether spatial characteristics of sound objects impact on emotional processing, i. e., whether position-independent and position-linked representations play a role in emotional auditory processing.iii)Assess the role of early-stage auditory areas in semantic, spatial and emotional representations and their contribution to training induced plasticity.iv)Compare functional organisation and learning-induced plasticity of the auditory semantic and spatial representations in normal subjects and in brain-damaged patients. The primary importance of this project is conceptual, in that will help to understand sound object representation and its break-down in brain damage. The analysis of processing within early-stage auditory areas will allow comparison with non-human primate models and hence most likely a better grasp of the underlying neural mechanisms. As a whole this project is, however, also likely to give new understanding of training-induced plasticity following brain lesions, which is at heart of cognitive rehabilitation.
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