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Entwicklung und Funktion von motorischen Netzwerken

English title Assembly and function of motor circuits
Applicant Arber Silvia
Number 140625
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Abteilung Zellbiologie Biozentrum Universität Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Start/End 01.04.2012 - 31.03.2015
Approved amount 930'000.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Genetics

Keywords (7)

Motor control; Developmental biology; Neural circuit assembly; Spinal cord; Transcription factors; Mouse genetics; Neuronal specification

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
An important goal in neuroscience is to understand how the assembly of neuronal circuits contributes to the emergence of function controlling dedicated animal behaviors. Motor behavior represents the ultimate output of nearly all nervous system activity. An intricate network of neuronal circuits within the spinal cord communicating bi-directionally with higher centers in the brainstem and brain, as well as integrating sensory feedback from the periphery ensures the accuracy of motor output. Despite its seeming complexity, the final motor output system displays an exquisite degree of organization, and is experimentally accessible at a high degree of specificity, using genetic, molecular, anatomical and physiological analysis linked to a direct behavioral output. The overall goal of our studies will be to extract information on how – at the neuronal circuit level – specificity of connections in the motor system can explain behaviors as complex as motor behavior. Our major focus over the next several years will be to contribute to our understanding of how motor circuits influence and regulate the activity of functionally defined groups of motor neurons in the spinal cord.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Distinct limb and trunk premotor circuits establish laterality in the spinal cord.
Goetz Cyrill, Pivetta Chiara, Arber Silvia (2015), Distinct limb and trunk premotor circuits establish laterality in the spinal cord., in Neuron, 85(1), 131-144.
Brainstem nucleus MdV mediates skilled forelimb motor tasks.
Esposito Maria Soledad, Capelli Paolo, Arber Silvia (2014), Brainstem nucleus MdV mediates skilled forelimb motor tasks., in Nature, 508(7496), 351-356.
Degradation of mouse locomotor pattern in the absence of proprioceptive sensory feedback.
Akay Turgay, Tourtellotte Warren G, Arber Silvia, Jessell Thomas M (2014), Degradation of mouse locomotor pattern in the absence of proprioceptive sensory feedback., in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(47), 16877-16882.
Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin.
Pivetta Chiara, Esposito Maria Soledad, Sigrist Markus, Arber Silvia (2014), Motor-circuit communication matrix from spinal cord to brainstem neurons revealed by developmental origin., in Cell, 156(3), 537-548.
Muscle spindle feedback directs locomotor recovery and circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury.
Takeoka Aya, Vollenweider Isabel, Courtine Grégoire, Arber Silvia (2014), Muscle spindle feedback directs locomotor recovery and circuit reorganization after spinal cord injury., in Cell, 159(7), 1626-1639.
Transneuronal propagation of mutant huntingtin contributes to non-cell autonomous pathology in neurons.
Pecho-Vrieseling Eline, Rieker Claus, Fuchs Sascha, Bleckmann Dorothee, Esposito Maria Soledad, Botta Paolo, Goldstein Chris, Bernhard Mario, Galimberti Ivan, Müller Matthias, Lüthi Andreas, Arber Silvia, Bouwmeester Tewis, van der Putten Herman, Di Giorgio Francesco Paolo (2014), Transneuronal propagation of mutant huntingtin contributes to non-cell autonomous pathology in neurons., in Nature neuroscience, 17(8), 1064-1072.
Carving axon arbors to fit: master directs one kinase at a time.
Satoh Daisuke, Arber Silvia (2013), Carving axon arbors to fit: master directs one kinase at a time., in Cell, 153(7), 1425-1426.
Locomotor rhythm generation linked to the output of spinal shox2 excitatory interneurons.
Dougherty Kimberly J, Zagoraiou Laskaro, Satoh Daisuke, Rozani Ismini, Doobar Staceyann, Arber Silvia, Jessell Thomas M, Kiehn Ole (2013), Locomotor rhythm generation linked to the output of spinal shox2 excitatory interneurons., in Neuron, 80(4), 920-933.
Specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections imposed by repellent Sema3E-PlexinD1 signaling.
Fukuhara Kaori, Imai Fumiyasu, Ladle David R, Katayama Kei-ichi, Leslie Jennifer R, Arber Silvia, Jessell Thomas M, Yoshida Yutaka (2013), Specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections imposed by repellent Sema3E-PlexinD1 signaling., in Cell reports, 5(3), 748-758.
The organization of submodality-specific touch afferent inputs in the vibrissa column.
Sakurai Katsuyasu, Akiyama Masahiro, Cai Bin, Scott Alexandra, Han Bao-Xia, Takatoh Jun, Sigrist Markus, Arber Silvia, Wang Fan (2013), The organization of submodality-specific touch afferent inputs in the vibrissa column., in Cell reports, 5(1), 87-98.
Motor circuits in action: specification, connectivity, and function.
Arber Silvia (2012), Motor circuits in action: specification, connectivity, and function., in Neuron, 74(6), 975-989.
Scaling proprioceptor gene transcription by retrograde NT3 signaling.
Lee Jun, Friese Andreas, Mielich Monika, Sigrist Markus, Arber Silvia (2012), Scaling proprioceptor gene transcription by retrograde NT3 signaling., in PloS one, 7(9), e45551-e45551.
Wnt7A identifies embryonic γ-motor neurons and reveals early postnatal dependence of γ-motor neurons on a muscle spindle-derived signal.
Ashrafi Soha, Lalancette-Hébert Melanie, Friese Andreas, Sigrist Markus, Arber Silvia, Shneider Neil A, Kaltschmidt Julia A (2012), Wnt7A identifies embryonic γ-motor neurons and reveals early postnatal dependence of γ-motor neurons on a muscle spindle-derived signal., in The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 32(25), 8725-8731.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Klaus Conzelmann/University of Munich Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Thomas M. Jessell/Columbia University, New York United States of America (North America)
- Publication
Andreas Luethi/Friedrich Miescher Institut Switzerland (Europe)
- Publication
Gregoire Courtine/University of Zurich Switzerland (Europe)
- Publication
Martyn Goulding/Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, La Jolla United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Ed Callaway/Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, La Jolla United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Pico Caroni/Friedrich Miescher Institute Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Eline Pecho-Vrieseling/Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research Switzerland (Europe)
- Publication
Botond Roska/Friedrich Miescher Institute Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
The Alice and Joseph Brooks International Lecture on the Neurosciences - Keynote Speaker Talk given at a conference Specificity and modules in circuits for motor control 12.02.2015 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States of America Arber Silvia;
Gordon Research conference on Neural Development: From Stem Cells to Circuits Talk given at a conference Specificity and modules in circuits for motor control 10.08.2014 Salve Regina University, Newport, RI, United States of America Arber Silvia;
Neural Networks in the Arctic - Kavli Foundation Conference Talk given at a conference Specificity and modules in circuits for motor control 05.06.2014 Longyearbyen, Spitsbergen, Norway Arber Silvia; Esposito Maria Soledad;
Neurobiology of Action - FENS and the European Neuroscience Foundation: The Brain Conferences Talk given at a conference The ups and downs of motor circuit organization 20.10.2013 Stresa, Italy Pivetta Chiara; Arber Silvia; Basaldella Emanuela;
EPFL Life Science Symposium (LSS) on Motor Control Talk given at a conference The ups and downs of motor circuit organization 28.08.2013 EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Götz Cyrill; Arber Silvia; Esposito Maria Soledad; Pivetta Chiara;
The Future of Axon Guidance - Les Treilles Meeting Talk given at a conference The ups and downs of motor circuit organization 27.05.2013 Les Treilles foundation, Tourtour, France Arber Silvia;
From Sensation to Action - 25th Anniversary Cambridge Neuroscience Symposium - Plenary Lecture Talk given at a conference Organization and function of motor circuits 26.03.2013 Cambridge, Great Britain and Northern Ireland Arber Silvia;
Cologne Spring Meeting 2013: Neural Circuits: development, function and, degeneration Talk given at a conference Organization and function of circuits controlling motor behavior 27.02.2013 Cologne, Germany Arber Silvia;
Gordon Research Conference on Neural Development Talk given at a conference Organizational principles of antagonistic motor circuits 12.08.2012 Salve Regina University, Newport, RI, United States of America Arber Silvia;
Cellular and network functions in the spinal cord - Madison Spinal Cord Meeting 2012 - Plenary Lecture Talk given at a conference Organizational principles of antagonistic motor circuits 22.05.2012 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States of America Arber Silvia;
Constructing Neural Circuits - Janelia Farm Research Campus Conference - Keynote Talk Talk given at a conference Organizational principles of antagonistic motor circuits 28.04.2012 Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, United States of America Arber Silvia;


Self-organised

Title Date Place

Knowledge transfer events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Date Place Persons involved


Awards

Title Year
Member of Academia Europaea 2014
Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science 2014
Otto Naegeli Prize for Medical Research 2014 2014
Wissenschaftspreis der Stadt Basel (City of Basel Science Award) 2014 2014

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
160339 Entwicklung und Funktion von motorischen Netzwerken 01.04.2015 Project funding (Div. I-III)
125973 Genetic control of neuronal circuit assembly in the spinal cord 01.04.2009 Project funding (Div. I-III)
160339 Entwicklung und Funktion von motorischen Netzwerken 01.04.2015 Project funding (Div. I-III)
179403 Brainstem Circuits Controlling Movement 01.04.2018 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

An important goal in neuroscience is to understand how the assembly of neuronal circuits contributes to the emergence of function controlling dedicated animal behaviors. Motor behavior represents the ultimate output of nearly all nervous system activity. An intricate network of neuronal circuits within the spinal cord communicating bi-directionally with higher centers in the brainstem and brain, as well as integrating sensory feedback from the periphery ensures the accuracy of motor output. Despite its seeming complexity, the final motor output system displays an exquisite degree of organization, and is experimentally accessible at a high degree of specificity, using genetic, molecular, anatomical and physiological analysis linked to a direct behavioral output. The overall goal of our studies will be to extract information on how - at the neuronal circuit level - specificity of connections in the motor system can explain behaviors as complex as motor behavior. Our major focus over the next several years will be to contribute to our understanding of how motor circuits influence and regulate the activity of functionally defined groups of motor neurons in the spinal cord. All experimental approaches described here have the common goal to study how establishment and connectivity of circuits relates to and controls the emergence of motor function. The projects described in the detailed research plan will represent a major effort in my laboratory over the next several years. They are presented in four main sections, but technologies and concepts overarch the entire proposal.(1) Regulation of connectivity and transcription by retrograde NT3 signaling: These studies aim at providing us with an understanding of the mechanisms regulating connectivity and transcription controlled by retrograde NT3 signaling. We will (a) study the distribution of premotor interneuron subpopulations in mice with genetically altered NT3 levels, (b) determine genome-wide transcription profiles of isolated proprioceptive afferents derived from mice with altered NT3 levels, and (c) establish a strategy based on next generation sequencing approaches to identify subpopulation gene expression based on profiles of individual neurons and computational analysis. (2) The role of proprioceptive feedback circuits in assembly and function of motor circuits: The main aim of this project is to reveal the role of the proprioceptive feedback system in motor circuit assembly and function in the spinal cord. We will (a) identify the nature of the signal required for extensor-specific premotor connectivity, (b) establish systems for conditional ablation or alternation of activity patterns in proprioceptors, and (c) determine consequences of proprioceptor ablation at different developmental time points for circuit connectivity and motor behavior. (3) Timing of neurogenesis in motor circuit connectivity and function: This part of the project aims at elucidating the importance and rules of timing of neurogenesis for the establishment of motor circuits. We will (a) address whether individual spinal progenitor cell clones give rise to spinal premotor interneurons with distinct function and elucidate how timing of neurogenesis intersects with the acquisition of transcriptional profiles, and (b) establish whether causality between neuronal birthdating and motor circuit function exists. Together, these experiments will reveal the contribution of neurogenesis timing to the establishment and function of motor circuits.(4) Premotor network analysis of motor neurons of different evolutionary emergence: This project will address the question of whether premotor networks controlling the activation of motor neurons with different evolutionarily standing exhibit distinct or similar spinal distribution patterns. We will categorize which neuronal types of the premotor network are shared or split between ancestrally distinct motor neuron populations. These will include motor neurons innervating axial muscles, body wall muscles, as well as proximal and distal limb muscles, comparing hind- and forelimb patterns; providing insight into different circuit modules and strategies of motor control.
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