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Compressibility and speciation of volatile-bearing silicate melts II

English title Compressibility and speciation of volatile-bearing silicate melts II
Applicant Sanchez-Valle Carmen
Number 140558
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Institut für Geochemie und Petrologie ETH Zürich
Institution of higher education ETH Zurich - ETHZ
Main discipline Geochemistry
Start/End 01.08.2012 - 31.07.2013
Approved amount 140'147.00
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All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Geochemistry
Mineralogy
Geophysics

Keywords (6)

X-ray absorption; Diamond anvil cell; volatile-bearing silicate melts; compressiblity and equation of state; Brillouin spectroscopy; Paris-Edinburgh press

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

Knowledge of density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts under relevant pressure and temperature conditions is essential for understanding the dynamics of magmatic systems in the lower crusts and upper mantle. For example, the density contrast between the melt and the surrounding rocks provides the driving force for the rising of the melts within the crust, controls the stratification of igneous bodies, melt segregation as well as fractionation and partial melting processes. However, the determination of these properties at simultaneous high-pressure, high-temperature conditions is not straightforward and data is available only for a very limited range of pressures, temperatures and compositions. This proposal aims at determining the density of dry and hydrous silicate melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant for subduction zone and crustal settings.

 In the first part of the project, the density and structure of water-bearing andesitic and basaltic liquids (5 to 10 wt% H2O) will be determined by X-ray absorption and X-ray diffraction at conditions that pertains to magmatic processes (up to 4 GPa and 2100 K) using a Paris-Edinburgh press and synchrotron radiation. These experiments will result in the first experimentally derived equation of state of andesitic and basaltic liquids and builds up on recent work conducted in our group to determine the density of hydrous granitic (with support from SNF200021_13011234) and water and CO2-bearing alkaline magmas. On the other hand, the density of water-rich granite-H2O liquids (> 25 wt% H2O) will be determined up  to 1200 K and 3 GPa from acoustic velocity measurements in an externally heated diamond anvil cell using Brilouin scattering spectroscopy. Both approaches are complementary and necessary to determine the density of hydrous silicate melts on broad range of pressure, temperature and compositions of geological relevance.

Density and structural data obtained in this project will be combined with literature data on hydrous peridotite liquids and own results for granites and alkaline magmas  to implement a general model to predict the density of hydrous magmatic liquids down to the top of the upper mantle. Such a model will be of fundamental importance to address some of the most important open questions in igneous petrology, including magma differentiation, melt migration and emplacement in the crust, which will lead to a better understanding of crust formation processes.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Densityofphonoliticmagmasandtimescalesofcrystalfractionationinmagmachambers
Seifert Rita, Malfait Wim J., Petitgirard Sylvain, Sanchez-Valle Carmen (2013), Densityofphonoliticmagmasandtimescalesofcrystalfractionationinmagmachambers, in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 381, 12-20.
Partialmolar volume and compressibility of dissolved CO2 in glasseswith magmatic compositions
Seifert Rita, Malfait Wim J, Lerch Philippe, Sanchez-Valle Carmen (2013), Partialmolar volume and compressibility of dissolved CO2 in glasseswith magmatic compositions, in Chemical Geology, 358, 119-130.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Universite de Lyon France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
Okayama University Japan (Asia)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure
Swiss Light Source (PSI) Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure
ESRF France (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
- Research Infrastructure

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
IAVCEI 2013 Scientific Assembly 2013 Talk given at a conference 20.07.2013 Kagoshima, Japan Malfait Wim Jan; Sanchez-Valle Carmen;
Fall AGU meeting 2012 Poster 03.12.2012 San Francisco, United States of America Malfait Wim Jan; Sanchez-Valle Carmen;
Fall AGU meeting 2012 Talk given at a conference 03.12.2012 San Francisco, United States of America Malfait Wim Jan; Sanchez-Valle Carmen;
Fall AGU meeting 2012 Poster 03.12.2012 San Francisco, United States of America Sanchez-Valle Carmen; Malfait Wim Jan;


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
130123 Compressibility and speciation of volatile-bearing silicate melts 01.08.2010 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

Compressibility and structure of volatile-bearing silicate melts This project is a continuation of an ongoing project: “Compressibility and speciation of volatile-bearing silicate melts (200021_13011234)”. The aim of the project remains largely unchanged, but additional experimental approaches will be applied to answer the same scientific questions. Knowledge of density and compressibility of volatile-bearing silicate melts under relevant pressure and temperature conditions is essential for understanding the dynamics of magmatic systems in the lower crusts and upper mantle. For example, the density contrast between the melt and the surrounding rocks provides the driving force for the rising of the melts within the crust, controls the stratification of igneous bodies, melt segregation as well as fractionation and partial melting processes. However, the determination of these properties at simultaneous high-pressure, high-temperature conditions is not straightforward and data is available only for a very limited range of pressures, temperatures and compositions. This proposal aims at determining the density of dry and hydrous silicate melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant for subduction zone and crustal settings. In the first part of the project, the density and structure of water-bearing andesitic and basaltic liquids (5 to 10 wt% H2O) will be determined using X-ray absorption and X-ray diffraction at conditions that pertains to magmatic processes (up to 4 GPa and 2100 K) using a Paris-Edinburgh press and synchrotron radiation. These experiments will result in the first experimentally derived equation of state of andesitic and basaltic liquids and builds up on recent work conducted in our group to determine the density of hydrous granitic (with support from SNF200021_13011234) and water and CO2-bearing alkaline magmas. On the other hand, the density of water-rich granite-H2O liquids (> 25 wt% H2O) will be determined up to 1200 K and 3 GPa from acoustic velocity measurements in an externally heated diamond anvil cell using Brilouin scattering spectroscopy. Both approaches are complementary and necessary to determine the density of hydrous silicate melts on broad range of pressure, temperature and compositions of geological relevance. Density and structural data obtained in this project will be combined with literature data on hydrous peridotite liquids and own results for granites and alkaline magmas to implement a general model to predict the density of hydrous magmatic liquids down to the top of the upper mantle. Such a model will be of fundamental importance to address some of the most important open questions in igneous petrology, including magma differentiation, melt migration and emplacement in the crust, which will lead to a better understanding of crust formation processes.
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