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Cellular specificity in wound signalling and hormone synthesis in Arabidopsis

Applicant Farmer Edward Elliston
Number 138235
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Département de Biologie moléculaire des plantes Université de Lausanne
Institution of higher education University of Lausanne - LA
Main discipline Botany
Start/End 01.01.2012 - 31.12.2014
Approved amount 686'250.00
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Keywords (5)

wounding; plant; jasmonic acid; cell specificity; laser

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

All multiucellular organisms, whether animals or plants, respond to wounding. If their tissues are damaged they must do the maximum to stop the loss of valuable cell contents and to impede the growth of pathogens at the wound site. These reponses are active and they require cells in the organism to both detect the wound and to convey this information to other cells that will respond by making hormones that control wound responses and wound healing. In plants, a major wound hormone is jasmonnic acid. This proposal is funded to study the wound responses of a plant called Arabidopsis thaliana and is very much centred on the question of which cells in this plant can perceive a wound. To do this we will work at the seedling stage where these plants are tiny, about 0.5 cm long. Some work will also be conducted with leaves. Will we investigate two main things. Firstly, which cells in the plant can perceive a wound? Secondly, which cells make jasmonic acid and are these the same cells that perceive the wound? Of course, it is possible that every single cell living in the plant body can do this-but this is unlikely to be the case. One of the main experiments we will undertake is to try to add back the ability to make jasmonic acid to specific cells in a mutant plant that cannot make the compound. This will involve expressing a functional gene in very specific cell types and wounding only very localised defeined regions using lasers.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Membranes as structural antioxidants: Recycling of malondialdehyde to its source in oxidation-sensitive chloroplast fatty acids.
Schmid-Siegert Emanuel (2016), Membranes as structural antioxidants: Recycling of malondialdehyde to its source in oxidation-sensitive chloroplast fatty acids., in Journal of Biological Chemistry, 291, 13005-13013.
Axial and radial oxylipin transport
Gasperini Debora (2015), Axial and radial oxylipin transport, in Plant Physiology, 169, 2244-2254.
Multilayered organization of jasmonate signaling in the regulation of root growth
Gasperini Debora (2015), Multilayered organization of jasmonate signaling in the regulation of root growth, in PLoS Genetics, 11(6), e1005300.
Measuring surface potential changes on leaves.
Mousavi Seyed A R, Nguyen Chi Tam, Farmer Edward E, Kellenberger Stephan (2014), Measuring surface potential changes on leaves., in Nature protocols, 9(8), 1997-2004.
Real-time, in vivo intracellular recordings of caterpillar-induced depolarization waves in sieve elements using aphid electrodes.
Salvador-Recatalà Vicenta, Tjallingii W Freddy, Farmer Edward E (2014), Real-time, in vivo intracellular recordings of caterpillar-induced depolarization waves in sieve elements using aphid electrodes., in The New phytologist, 203(2), 674-84.
The squeeze cell hypothesis for the activation of jasmonate synthesis in response to wounding
Farmer Edward E., Gasperini Debora, Acosta Ivan F. (2014), The squeeze cell hypothesis for the activation of jasmonate synthesis in response to wounding, in NEW PHYTOLOGIST, 204(2), 282-288.
Four 13-lipoxygenases contribute to rapid jasmonate synthesis in wounded Arabidopsis leaves: a role for LOX6 in responses to long distance wound signals.
Chauvin (2013), Four 13-lipoxygenases contribute to rapid jasmonate synthesis in wounded Arabidopsis leaves: a role for LOX6 in responses to long distance wound signals., in New Phytologist, 197, 566-575.
GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR-LIKE genes mediate leaf-to-leaf wound signalling.
Mousavi S.A.R. (2013), GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR-LIKE genes mediate leaf-to-leaf wound signalling., in Nature, 500, 422-426.
Role of NINJA in root jasmonate signaling.
Acosta Ivan (2013), Role of NINJA in root jasmonate signaling., in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110, 15473-15478.
ROS-mediated lipid peroxidation and RES-activated signaling
Farmer E.E (2013), ROS-mediated lipid peroxidation and RES-activated signaling, in Annual Review of Plant Biology, 64, 429-450.
A regulatory network for coordinated flower maturation
Reeves P.H. (2012), A regulatory network for coordinated flower maturation, in PLoS Genetics, 8, e1002506.
Effects of fou8/fry1 mutation on sulfur metabolism. Is decreased internal sulfate the trigger of sulfate starvation response?
Lee B-R. (2012), Effects of fou8/fry1 mutation on sulfur metabolism. Is decreased internal sulfate the trigger of sulfate starvation response?, in PLoS One, 7(6), e39425.
Inducible malondialdehyde pools in zones of cell proliferation and developing tissues in Arabidopsis.
Schmid-Siegert E. (2012), Inducible malondialdehyde pools in zones of cell proliferation and developing tissues in Arabidopsis., in Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287, 8954-8962.
Plants and tortoises: mutations in the Arabidopsis jasmonate pathway increase feeding in a vertebrate herbivore
Mafli A. (2012), Plants and tortoises: mutations in the Arabidopsis jasmonate pathway increase feeding in a vertebrate herbivore, in Molecular Ecology, 21, 2534-2541.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Stephan Kellenberger, UNIL Lausanne Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
J.L. Wolfender, Geneva Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Rainer Hedrich, Univ. Wuerzburg, D. Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Awards

Title Year
J-M. Delwart Prize Belgian Academy of Sciences 2014

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
154438 Signal Integration in Plants: UV-B, Shade and Biotic Stress 01.10.2014 Sinergia
145002 Microscale thermophoresis for the Faculty of Bology and Medicine in Lausanne 01.12.2012 R'EQUIP
122441 Jasmonate signalling in Arabidopsis midribs in response to wounding 01.01.2009 Project funding (Div. I-III)
155960 The role of GLR genes in long distance jasmonate signalling 01.01.2015 Project funding (Div. I-III)
157884 Supercritical fluid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as a new analytical tool for plant sciences 01.06.2015 R'EQUIP
175566 Wound activation of jasmonate signalling: extending the squeeze cell hypothesis 01.03.2018 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

All parts of the bodies of multicellular organisms have to be able to respond to wounding and, in animals, this process involves cells that play specific roles in the healing process. Some of these cells actually migrate into wounded tissues from the surrounding tissues. In contrast, cell migration does not occur in plants and it is not known whether discrete cell types in the leaf have specialised roles in wound perception and in the production of wound hormones such as jasmonates. Jasmonates accumulate rapidly in the vicinity of wounds (in a timescale of tens of seconds) but little is known about where jasmonate synthesis takes place and how this is regulated. In which cell types are jasmonates made and which cells need to be wounded to initiate their synthesis? Do the abilities to generate jasmonate-synthesis activating signals and to make JA-Ile reside in all cells within the plant body, or do these events take place in discrete or even in exclusive cell types? This proposal focusses on these spatial aspects in the intiation of jasmonate synthesis using jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) as a marker. JA-Ile quantitation will be coupled to laser-targetted wounding to localise the areas in Arabidopsis seedlings that must be wounded in order to intitate JA-Ile accumulation 30 min after wounding. JAZ10-based reporters will be used as additional readouts for these experiments. Making use of a knowledge of JA-Ile accumulation in seedlings and the importance of parastichies in leaf-to-leaf wound signalling in rosettes we will employ promoter-specific rescue of the jasmonate biosynthesis gene ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE (AOS) in an aos mutant background. Based on results from this we will produce sector mosaic plants by selectively ablating AOS expression domains, again using tissue-specific promoters. Finally, using knowledge gained from an earlier part of the project on seedlings we will initiate a novel genetic screen to look for mutants with defective spatial responses to wounding. The proposed work should reveal to what extent different cell types in plants cooperate to counter the threat posed by wounding and whether these cell types originate from the same meristematic layers.Questions: 1. Which tissue types in 5 d-old seedlings need to be wounded in order to initiate JA-Ile and JA accumulation and JAZ10 expression?2. What is the timeframe of the long-distance signal(s) leading to JA-Ile accumulation in distal organs of 4 d-old seedlings after wounding one cotyledon?3. Which cell types can produce JA-Ile?4. Can mutants with altered spatial JAZ10 expression patterns be identified in wounded seedlings.
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