Project

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Understanding nanofriction and dissipation across phase transitions

Applicant Meyer Ernst
Number 136287
Funding scheme Sinergia
Research institution Departement Physik Universität Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Condensed Matter Physics
Start/End 01.09.2011 - 31.08.2015
Approved amount 2'000'000.00
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All Disciplines (2)

Discipline
Condensed Matter Physics
Physical Chemistry

Keywords (4)

Nanotribology; Phase transitions; Friction force microscopy; Density functional theory

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

The ability to control and manipulate frictional forces at the nanoscale is extremely important for technology, which is closely tied to progress in transportation, manufacturing, energy conversion, and lubricant consumption, impacting on innumerable aspects of our health and environment. In recent years a lot of effort has been spent to gain control of friction at both the macroscopic and microscopic scale. However most of the employed techniques cannot be straightforwardly extended to the nanoscale. A flexible and almost cost-free way to dynamically tune friction force at the nanoscale is still lacking.  The flexibility of some physical property of the sliding bodies, necessary to actuate a dynamical control of friction, might be provided by the occurrence of a phase transition. Recently the possibility to control nanofriction by switching the order parameter of a structural phase transition has been theoretically demonstrated. Friction Force Microscopy (FFM) experiments on a model ferro-distortive substrate have been simulated, showing a non monotonic behavior of friction as a function of the substrate temperature, broadly peaking at the critical temperature. Besides this unusual feature (stick-slip friction of a single contact on ordinary substrates is known to decrease monotonically unless multiple slips occur), below the critical temperature, the frictional response is found to depend strongly on the substrate distortive order parameter: different values of the substrate distortion can give rise to a very different friction force. Acting now with an external stress field the distortive order parameter of the substrate can be changed reversibly and dynamically, increasing or decreasing the frictional properties of the substrate. Contrary to the friction reduction through mechanical vibrations, here the external field needs to be switched on only for a very short time to induce a change in the distortion of the substrate and, upon switching it off, the material will keep the newly induced distortion.   Experimental evidences of this kind of friction control technique to be practically actuated are already present. We propose a joint experimental, theoretical and computational project aimed at designing methods and algorithms to control friction by dynamically driving a phase transition occurring in the substrate underneath the sliding surface. Extending the example outlined above, we  intend  to  address, through experiment and theory,  the widest variety of substrate phase transitions, from a) structural, including  distortive and plastic,  to b) electronic, including superconducting and metal insulator,  to c) magnetic. Building in each case upon long established understanding of the phase transitions, and from exploiting the modest available topographic evidence of domains -- in some case of dissipation too --obtained by tip based tools, we plan to attack these three areas using a well assorted arsenal of tools. Experimentally, force friction microscopy (FFM), contact and noncontact  atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the most recent ultra-sensitive pendulum-type AFM, among others, will be exploited. Conversely, theoretical formulations, classical and quantum modeling, classical Molecular Dynamics (MD)  dynamical simulations of friction and dissipation, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT)  will be used to address these systems.

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Superlubricity of graphene nanoribbons on gold surfaces
S. Kawai A. Benassi E. Gnecco H. Söde R. Pawlak X. Feng K. Müllen D. Passerone C. A. Pignedo (2016), Superlubricity of graphene nanoribbons on gold surfaces, in Science, 351, 957.
Dissipation at large separation
M. Kisiel M. Langer U. Gysin S. Rast E. Meyer D. W. Lee (2015), Dissipation at large separation, in E. Gnecco and E. Meyer (ed.), Springer, Berlin, 609-626.
Driven colloidal monolayers: static and dynamic friction
A. Vanossi N. Manini and E. Tosatti (2015), Driven colloidal monolayers: static and dynamic friction, in E. Gnecco and E. Meyer (ed.), Springer, Berlin, 427-449.
Fundamentals of Friction and Wear on the Nanoscale
E. Gnecco and E. Meyer (Eds.) (2015), Fundamentals of Friction and Wear on the Nanoscale, Springer, Berlin.
Noncontact Atomic Force Microscope Dissipation Reveals a Central Peak of SrTiO3 Structural Phase Transition
M. Kisiel F. Pellegrini G. E. Santoro M. Samadashvili R. Pawlak A. Benassi U. Gysin R. Buzio (2015), Noncontact Atomic Force Microscope Dissipation Reveals a Central Peak of SrTiO3 Structural Phase Transition, in Phys. Rev. Lett., 115, 046101.
Non-contact friction
M. Kisiel M. Samadashvili U. Gysin E. Meyer (2015), Non-contact friction, in S. Morita F.J. Giessibl E. Meyer and R. Wiesendanger (ed.), Springer, Berlin, 93-110.
Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging
R. Capozza A. Vanossi A. Benassi and E. Tosatti (2015), Squeezout phenomena and boundary layer formation of a model ionic liquid under confinement and charging, in J. Chem. Phys., 142, 06470.
CDW slips and giant frictional dissipation peaks at the NbSe2 surface
Markus Langer Marcin Kisiel Remy Pawlak Franco Pellegrini Giuseppe E. Santoro Renato Buzio And (2014), CDW slips and giant frictional dissipation peaks at the NbSe2 surface, in Nat. Mat., 10, 119-122.
Charge-density-wave surface phase slips and noncontact nanofriction
F. Pellegrini G.E. Santoro E. Tosatti (2014), Charge-density-wave surface phase slips and noncontact nanofriction, in Phys. Rev. B , 89, 245416.
Does rotational melting make molecular crystals more slippery
A. Benassi A. Vanossi C.A. Pingnedoli D. Passerone and E. Tosatti (2014), Does rotational melting make molecular crystals more slippery, in Nanoscale, 6, 13163.
Microscale Motion Control through Ferromagnetic Films
A. Benassi J. Schwenk M.A. Marioni H.J. Hug and D. Passerone (2014), Microscale Motion Control through Ferromagnetic Films, in Adv. Mater. Interfaces , 1, 1400023.
Soliton dynamics in a solid lubricant during sliding friction
A. Vigentini B. Van Hattem E.Diato P.PonzelliniT.Meledina A.VanossiG.E.SantoroE.Tosatti N.Ma (2014), Soliton dynamics in a solid lubricant during sliding friction, in Phys. Rev. B, 89, 094301.
Elastic Response of Graphene Nanodomes
S. Koch D. Stradi E. Gnecco S. Barja S. Kawai C. Díaz M. Alcamí F. Martín A. L. V. de Parga (2013), Elastic Response of Graphene Nanodomes, in ACS Nano, 7, 2927.
Electrostatic interactions with dielectric samples in scanning probe microscopies
A. Sadeghi A. Baratoff and S. Goedecker (2013), Electrostatic interactions with dielectric samples in scanning probe microscopies, in Phys. Rev. B, 88, 035436.
Energy Loss Triggered by Atomic-Scale Lateral Force
F. Federici Canova S. Kawai C. de Capitani K. Kan’no Th. Glatzel B. Such A. S. Foster and E. (2013), Energy Loss Triggered by Atomic-Scale Lateral Force, in Phys. Rev. Lett., 110, 203203.
Hydrogen plasma microlithography of graphene supported on a Si/SiO2 substrate
B. Eren Th. Glatzel M. Kisiel W. Fu R. Pawlak U. Gysin C. Nef L. Marot M. Calame Ch. Schöne (2013), Hydrogen plasma microlithography of graphene supported on a Si/SiO2 substrate, in Appl. Phys. Lett., 102, 071602.
Size Scaling of Static Friction
O.M. Braun N. Manini E. Tosatti (2013), Size Scaling of Static Friction, in Phys. Rev. Lett., 110, 085503.
Collective Effects at Frictional Interfaces
O.M. Braun M. Peyrard D.V. Stryzheus (2012), Collective Effects at Frictional Interfaces, in Tribology Letters , 48, 11-25.
Measuring Electric Field Induced Subpicometer Displacement of Step Edge Ions
S. Kawai F. Federici Canova Th. Glatzel T. Hynninen E. Meyer and A. S. Foster (2012), Measuring Electric Field Induced Subpicometer Displacement of Step Edge Ions, in Phys. Rev. Lett., 109(14), 146101-20.
Multiscale approach for simulations of Kelvin probe force microscopy with atomic resolution
A. Sadeghi A. Baratoff S. A. Ghasemi S. Goedecker Th. Glatzel S. Kawai and E. Meyer (2012), Multiscale approach for simulations of Kelvin probe force microscopy with atomic resolution, in Phys. Rev. B, 86(7), 075407-5.
Optimal Energy Dissipation in Sliding Friction Simulations" A. Benassi, A. Vanossi
G.E. Santoro E. Tosatti (2012), Optimal Energy Dissipation in Sliding Friction Simulations" A. Benassi, A. Vanossi, in Tribology Letters, 48, 41-49.
High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale
A. Vanossi A. Benassi N. Varini E. Tosatti, High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale, in Phys. Rev. B, 87, 045412.
Modeling friction: From nanoscale to mesoscale
A. Vanossi N. Manini M. Urbakh N. Manini S. Zapperi and E. Tosatti, Modeling friction: From nanoscale to mesoscale, in Rev. Mod. Phys. , 85, 529.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Dr. Paolo Ferriani, Universität Kiel, Institute for theoretical Physics and Astrophysics. Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Scientific events



Self-organised

Title Date Place
Conference on Friction and Energy Dissipation in Man-Made and Biological Systems 05.11.2013 Trieste, Italy

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Media relations: print media, online media Press release for Science Article"Superlubricity of graphene nanoribbons on gold surfaces" Public relations of University of Basel International 2016

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
140812 Applied nanoscience: novel catalysts and bottom-up design of graphene-like nanostructures. Computational insight within a surface science laboratory 01.09.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)
129612 Structure prediction by global optimization 01.04.2010 Project funding (Div. I-III)
132375 Molecular self-assemblies, their metallic substrates, and quasicrystal surfaces: a computational approach 01.10.2010 Project funding (Div. I-III)
128754 UP-IPAZIA: “UPgrade and full deployment of the Empa/Eawag computational cluster IPAZIA: towards an interdisciplinary on-site resource for computational sciences” 01.04.2010 R'EQUIP

Abstract

The ability to control and manipulate frictional forces at the nanoscale is extremely important for technology, which is closely tied to progress in transportation, manufacturing, energy conversion, and lubricant consumption, impacting on innumerable aspects of our health and environment. As detailed in section 1.2, in recent years a lot of effort has been spent to gain control of friction at both the macroscopic and microscopic scale. However most of the employed techniques cannot be straightforwardly extended to the nanoscale. A flexible and almost cost-free way to dynamically tune friction force at the nanoscale is still lacking. The flexibility of some physical property of the sliding bodies, necessary to actuate a dynamical control of friction, might be provided by the occurrence of a phase transition. Recently the possibility to control nanofriction by switching the order parameter of a structural phase transition has been theoretically demonstrated (1). Friction Force Microscopy (FFM) experiments on a model ferro-distortive substrate have been simulated, showing a non monotonic behavior of friction as a function of the substrate temperature, broadly peaking at the critical temperature. Besides this unusual feature (stick-slip friction of a single contact on ordinary substrates is known to decrease monotonically unless multiple slips occur), below the critical temperature, the frictional response is found to depend strongly on the substrate distortive order parameter: different values of the substrate distortion can give rise to a very different friction force. Acting now with an external stress field the distortive order parameter of the substrate can be changed reversibly and dynamically, increasing or decreasing the frictional properties of the substrate. Contrary to the friction reduction through mechanical vibrations, here the external field needs to be switched on only for a very short time to induce a change in the distortion of the substrate and, upon switching it off, the material will keep the newly induced distortion.Experimental evidences of this kind of friction control technique to be practically actuated are already present and will be reviewed in section 1.2. We propose a joint experimental, theoretical and computa-tional project aimed at designing methods and algorithms to control friction by dynamically driving a phase transition occurring in the substrate underneath the sliding surface. Extending the example out-lined above, we intend to address, through experiment and theory, the widest variety of substrate phase transitions, from a) structural, including distortive and plastic, to b) electronic, including superconducting and metal insulator, to c) magnetic. Building in each case upon long established understanding of the phase transitions, and from exploiting the modest available topographic evidence of domains -- in some case of dissipation too --obtained by tip based tools, we plan to attack these three areas using a well as-sorted arsenal of tools. Experimentally, FFM, contact and noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM, ncAFM), and the most recent ultra-sensitive pendulum-type AFM, among others, will be exploited. Conversely, theoretical formulations, classical and quantum modeling, classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) dynamical simulations of friction and dissipation, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) will be used to address these systems.
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