Projekt

Zurück zur Übersicht

Catchment-scale hydrologic transport of herbicides: theory, observations, ecological risk assessment

Titel Englisch Catchment-scale hydrologic transport of herbicides: theory, observations, ecological risk assessment
Gesuchsteller/in Rinaldo Andrea
Nummer 135241
Förderungsinstrument Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)
Forschungseinrichtung Laboratoire d'écohydrologie EPFL - ENAC - IIE - ECHO
Hochschule EPF Lausanne - EPFL
Hauptdisziplin Hydrologie, Limnologie, Glaziologie
Beginn/Ende 01.06.2011 - 31.05.2015
Bewilligter Betrag 472'813.00
Alle Daten anzeigen

Alle Disziplinen (3)

Disziplin
Hydrologie, Limnologie, Glaziologie
Umweltforschung
Umwelttoxikologie

Keywords (5)

catchment-scale transport; herbicide transport; ecological risk assessment; hydrologic modelling; basin-scale transport phenomena

Lay Summary (Englisch)

Lead
Lay summary

Pesticides, especially herbicides, are widely used in agricultural catchments. Applied on soils, they are mobilized and transported, through runoff and sub-surface stormflow, to surface waters where they impact non-target organisms. Their occurence in water bodies and their deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems has been previously demonstrated. Recent legislations therefore propose water quality criteria for pesticides to protect the species living in there. However, these values are mainly defined as long-term protection goals, which do not reflect the pesticide pollution in rivers. Indeed, in this kind of surface waters, the concentrations of pesticides fluctuate greatly in time following rain events. The modelling and the risk assessment of these fluctuating concentrations have poorly been studied until now.

The main goal of our project is to (i) model and propose typical exposure scenarios for pesticides concentration in rivers, and (ii) assess the effects, and thus the risk, of these scenarios for aquatic ecosystems. The project will focus on herbicides as they represent the main part of pesticide contamination in water bodies. The modelling part, conducted by the first PhD, will focus on the development and application of proper tools for quantifying the dynamics of herbicides in soils. His/her specific sub-project will benefit from the data collected for one field site (to be instrumented and partially funded by EPFL) where discharge and herbicide concentration will be jointly measured. This, along with the detailed definition of applied herbicides loads, will lead to the definition and implementation of a proper source zone model as detailed in the research plan. The fate of the contaminant through the catchment and the river will be then modelled through the travel time distribution approach. This model will provide time-varying concentrations of herbicides in the river that will be calibrated against the data collected in the system. To evaluate the effects of the fluctuating concentrations (second Phd), dedicated test systems will be developed. Indeed classical ecotoxicological studies mainly focus on long-term experiment. Different kind of algae and algae communities will be used as test organisms as primary producers are particularly sensitive to herbicides. The results obtained will serve as basis for risk assessment of fluctuating concentrations. Furthermore, specific water quality criteria for this kind of exposure will be proposed.

This research addresses an open question on the risk of fluctuating concentrations of chemical substances in rivers. Indeed, this kind of exposure does not only concern pesticides, but also biocides and other organic compounds reaching surface water with rain event. The results of this project will therefore serve as example to evaluate and manage other environmental pollution.

Direktlink auf Lay Summary Letzte Aktualisierung: 21.02.2013

Verantw. Gesuchsteller/in und weitere Gesuchstellende

Mitarbeitende

Publikationen

Publikation
Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth
(2015), Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth, in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 113, 214-222.
Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae
(2015), Modelling the effects of pulse exposure of several PSII inhibitors on two algae, in Chemosphere, 137, 70-77.
Transport of fluorobenzoate tracers in a vegetated hydrologic control volume: 1. Experimental results
(2015), Transport of fluorobenzoate tracers in a vegetated hydrologic control volume: 1. Experimental results, in Water Resources Research, 51(4), 2773-2792.
Transport of fluorobenzoate tracers in a vegetated hydrologic control volume: 2. Theoretical inferences and modeling
(2015), Transport of fluorobenzoate tracers in a vegetated hydrologic control volume: 2. Theoretical inferences and modeling, in Water Resources Research, 51(4), 2793-2806.
Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application
(2013), Catchment-scale herbicides transport: Theory and application, in Advances in Water Resources, 52, 232-242.
Chloride circulation in a lowland catchment and the formulation of transport by travel time distributions
(2013), Chloride circulation in a lowland catchment and the formulation of transport by travel time distributions, in Water Resources Research, 49(8), 4619-4632.
Kinematics of age mixing in advection-dispersion models
(2013), Kinematics of age mixing in advection-dispersion models, in WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, 49(12), 8539-8551.
Dominant controls on pesticide transport from tile to catchment scale: Lessons from a minimalist model
(2012), Dominant controls on pesticide transport from tile to catchment scale: Lessons from a minimalist model, in WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, 48, W04525-W04525.
Modeling chloride transport using travel time distributions at Plynlimon, Wales
, Modeling chloride transport using travel time distributions at Plynlimon, Wales, in Water Resources Research.
Storage selection functions: A coherent framework for quantifying how catchments store and release water and solutes
, Storage selection functions: A coherent framework for quantifying how catchments store and release water and solutes, in Water Resources Research, 51.
Tracking residence times in hydrological systems: Forward and backward formulations
, Tracking residence times in hydrological systems: Forward and backward formulations, in Hydrological Processes.

Zusammenarbeit

Gruppe / Person Land
Formen der Zusammenarbeit
Universita di Padova Italien (Europa)
- vertiefter/weiterführender Austausch von Ansätzen, Methoden oder Resultaten
- Publikation
Purdue University Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika (Nordamerika)
- vertiefter/weiterführender Austausch von Ansätzen, Methoden oder Resultaten
- Publikation

Wissenschaftliche Veranstaltungen

Aktiver Beitrag

Titel Art des Beitrags Titel des Artikels oder Beitrages Datum Ort Beteiligte Personen
9th Symposium for European Freshwater Sciences Vortrag im Rahmen einer Tagung Modelling the effects of pulse exposure for several PSII inhibitors and algae. 05.07.2015 Geneve, Schweiz Copin Pierre-Jean; Chèvre Nathalie;
American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall meeting Vortrag im Rahmen einer Tagung Non-stationarity of solute travel time distribution observed in a controlled hydrologic transport volume 15.12.2014 San Francisco, CA, Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika Bertuzzo Enrico; Rinaldo Andrea; Queloz Pierre;
European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly Poster Non-stationarity in experimental travel time measured in a lysimeter: theoretical and modeling lessons from a simplified hydrological system 27.04.2014 Vienna, Oesterreich Rinaldo Andrea; Queloz Pierre; Bertuzzo Enrico;
American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall meeting Poster Tracer breakthrough curves in a complex lysimeter system: evidence of non-stationary transport 09.12.2013 San Francisco, CA, Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika Rinaldo Andrea; Bertuzzo Enrico; Queloz Pierre;
11th Swiss Geoscience Meeting Poster Herbicide export dynamics of a mid-sized lake tributary: lessons from observations and modeling 15.11.2013 Lausanne, Schweiz Queloz Pierre; Rinaldo Andrea; Bertuzzo Enrico;
SETAC Europe 23rd Annual meeting Poster Modelling the effect of fluctuating herbicide concentrations on algae growth 12.05.2013 Glasgow, Grossbritannien und Nordirland Copin Pierre-Jean; Chèvre Nathalie;
European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly Poster Development of a low-cost wireless controller for flexible sampling strategies based on real-time flow monitoring 07.04.2013 Vienna, Oesterreich Queloz Pierre; Rinaldo Andrea;
American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall meeting Poster Non-stationary hydrologic transport in the vadose zone: experimental results of multiple tracer injections in lysimeters 03.12.2012 San Francisco, CA, Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika Bertuzzo Enrico; Rinaldo Andrea; Queloz Pierre;
SETAC Europe 22nd Annual meeting / World 6th World Congress Poster Effect modelling of intermittent discharge of herbicides in watercourses 20.05.2012 Berlin, Deutschland Chèvre Nathalie; Copin Pierre-Jean;


Auszeichnungen

Titel Jahr
Doctorate Honoris Causa -- INRS & Université Québec-Laval 2014
Luigi Tartufari International Prize for the Geosciences -- Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (Rome) 2014
National Academy of Sciences -- Foreign Member 2012

Verbundene Projekte

Nummer Titel Start Förderungsinstrument
123021 Origin of micropollutants in the catchment and their transport to a mid-sized lake 01.10.2008 ProDoc (Forschungsmodul, FM)
123048 Microbial resistance, exotoxicological impact and risk assessment of micropollutants in a mid-sized lake 01.01.2009 ProDoc (Forschungsmodul, FM)

Abstract

Input of herbicides into the aquatic environments often occurs in pulses rather than continuous flows, resulting in fluctuating exposure of aquatic life to these pollutants. Indeed, herbicides reach surface waters through runoff and drainage mostly during and after rain events, which results in highly time-variant river concentrations. Traditional ecological risk assessment of herbicides, however, does not reflect the time varying character of herbicide exposure, since toxicity experiments are based on continuous exposure of an organism to a single pollutant. Furthermore, modelling of herbicide concentrations in rivers is rarely able to simulate these fluctuations, especially at the catchment scale. This renders the risk assessment of herbicides even harder. The present study aims to fill this gap by: i) proposing and validating through observations models designed to simulate fluctuating herbicides flux and resident concentrations in rivers at catchment scale; and ii) evaluating the effects of time-varying concentrations at different levels of biological organisation. The combination of these two pieces of information will lead to propose a methodology for ecological risk assessment of intermittent discharge of herbicides in rivers. The project will be focused on herbicides, which are commonly detected in surface waters and whose concentrations are often above protective goals during rain events. We will also select herbicides with different modes of action in order to propose a methodology applicable to most herbicides. The project is organized into two tightly coordinated subprojects whose objectives are:Subproject 1: the general modelling of herbicide transport at catchment scales -- inclusive of the prediction of intermittent water discharges and solute flux concentrations in response to application modes and hydrologic processes -- through proper accounting for the fact that solute concentration in measured in catchment discharge depends on hydrologic transport and biogeochemical activity mediated by the mixing of water of different ages (residence times) within the transport volumes carrying different chemical compositionSubproject 2: the assessment of the effects of sequential pulses of herbicides at different level of biological organisation, i.e. from single algae population to periphyton community. A particular emphasis will be given to the investigation of the recovery phase (after the exposure phase). Indeed this recovery is crucial for the preservation of the algae population, and previous studies showed that it might be incomplete in certain exposure conditions. Furthermore, the increase of the biological complexity will allow investigating the influence of competition on the response to sequential exposure and will serve as basis for proposing risk assessment approach for fluctuating concentrations of herbicides. New and existing observational data, general catchment-scale transport modelling and the related risk assessment relevant to Subprojects 1 and 2 will define an environmental protocol designed to become the standard for Swiss and international herbicides impact assessment.
-