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The Idling Brain: The Temporal Structure of Resting State Networks Revealed by Electrical Neuroimaging

English title The Idling Brain: The Temporal Structure of Resting State Networks Revealed by Electrical Neuroimaging
Applicant Michel Christoph
Number 132952
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Département des neurosciences fondamentales Faculté de Médecine Université de Genève
Institution of higher education University of Geneva - GE
Main discipline Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Start/End 01.11.2010 - 31.12.2014
Approved amount 468'000.00
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Keywords (9)

Resting-state networks; EEG; Microstates; Consciousness; fractal; fMRI; Neuroimaging; resting state networks; temporal dynamics

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Modern cognitive and clinical neuroscience research has started to recognize that the communication within and between large-scale neuronal networks is a crucial feature of brain functioning. This project will record high-density EEG in different healthy and clinical populations as well as in different species and will study brain network activity using modern linear and nonlinear spatio-temporal analysis methods.Background: Conscious mental activities are thought to rely on reciprocal interaction between different brain areas forming large-scale neurocognitive networks. While the areas implicated in different networks are relatively well defined through neuroimaging methods, the temporal dynamics of the interaction between the different areas is not yet understood. Because of the speed of information processing brain imaging methods with high temporal resolution are needed. In recent years electrical neuroimaging based on high-density Electroencephalography (EEG) has become a useful tool to study the temporal dynamics of large-scale brain networks non-invasively. We have in recent studies been able to show that the so-called EEG microstates, reflecting periods of spatial stability of electrical activity, are related to the resting state networks defined with functional MRI, and we could show that these microstates have very well defined temporal structure.Aim: The project will study the temporal structure of EEG microstates in detail using modern signal analysis methods. We believe that the this temporal structure is directly related to correct conscious cognitive activities, and that disturbance of this temporal structure will lead no mental disorders and in the extreme to the lost of consciousness. We will therefore study the EEG microstates not only in healthy adult human subjects at wake, but also in sleep and under anesthesia. In addition we will study newborn babies and different patient population including dementia, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and depression. Finally microstates will also be studied with multichannel EEG recorded in monkeys and mice. Most of this data has already been collected within other research projects and will be re-analyzed with these new methods and compared between each other.Significance: We are convinced that this project will provide a new approach to investigate the fundamental basics of large-scale functional networks of the brain. This method with its high temporal resolution is able to capture the rapid dynamics of the mental activities that are governed by these networks, and whose distortion may lead to the expression of several devastating neuropsychiatric diseases.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Deviant dynamics of EEG resting state pattern in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome adolescents: A vulnerability marker of schizophrenia?
Tomescu MI Rihs TA Becker R Britz J Custo A Grouiller F Schneider M Debbané M Eliez S Miche (2014), Deviant dynamics of EEG resting state pattern in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome adolescents: A vulnerability marker of schizophrenia?, in Schizophrenia Research, 157, 175-181.
EEG source imaging of brain states using spatiotemporal regression
Custo A Vulliemoz S Grouiller F Van De Ville D Michel C (2014), EEG source imaging of brain states using spatiotemporal regression, in Neuroimage, 1(96), 106-116.
EEG-microstate dependent emergence of perceptual awareness
Britz J Diaz Hernandez L Ro T Michel CM (2014), EEG-microstate dependent emergence of perceptual awareness, in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 14(8), 163-170.
Very early processing of emotional words revealed in temporoparietal junctions of both hemispheres by EEG and TMS
Rochas V Rihs TA Rosenberg N Landis T Michel CM (2014), Very early processing of emotional words revealed in temporoparietal junctions of both hemispheres by EEG and TMS, in Exp. Brain Res., 232(4), 1267-1281.
Left temporal alpha-band activity reflects single word intelligibility
Becker R Pefkou M Michel CM Hervais-Adelman AG (2013), Left temporal alpha-band activity reflects single word intelligibility, in Front Syst Neurosci, 7(121), 1-10.
EEG microstates of wakefulness and NREM sleep.
Brodbeck Verena, Kuhn Alena, von Wegner Frederic, Morzelewski Astrid, Tagliazucchi Enzo, Borisov Sergey, Michel Christoph M, Laufs Helmut (2012), EEG microstates of wakefulness and NREM sleep., in NeuroImage, 62(3), 2129-39.
EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics
Van de Ville D Britz J Michel CM. (2011), EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics, in Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 107(42), 18179-18184.
Insights from intermittent binocular rivalry and EEG
Pitts MA Britz J. (2011), Insights from intermittent binocular rivalry and EEG, in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 5, 107.
Perceptual reversals during binocular rivalry: ERP components and their concomitant source differences
Britz J. Pitts MA (2011), Perceptual reversals during binocular rivalry: ERP components and their concomitant source differences, in Psychophysiology, 48(11), 1490-1499.
Spatiotemporal analysis of multichannel EEG: CARTOOL.
Brunet D Murray MM Michel CM. (2011), Spatiotemporal analysis of multichannel EEG: CARTOOL., in Comput Intell Neurosci. , 2011(2011), 813870.
Towards the utilization of EEG as a brain imaging tool
Michel CM Murray M (2011), Towards the utilization of EEG as a brain imaging tool, in Neuroimage, 61, 371-385.
Altered auditory processing in frontal and left temporal cortex in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A group at high genetic risk for schizophrenia.
Rihs Tonia A, Tomescu Miralena I, Britz Juliane, Rochas Vincent, Custo Anna, Schneider Maude, Debbané Martin, Eliez Stephan, Michel Christoph M, Altered auditory processing in frontal and left temporal cortex in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A group at high genetic risk for schizophrenia., in Psychiatry research.
Microstates in resting-state EEG: Current status and future directions.
Khanna A Pascual-Leone A Michel CM Farzan F, Microstates in resting-state EEG: Current status and future directions., in Neurosci Biobehav Rev.
State-dependent visual processing
Britz J. Michel C.M., State-dependent visual processing, in Frontiers in Perception Science.
Whole-scalp EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials in macaque monkeys: a model for lesion-dependent plasticit
Gindrat A-D Quairiaux C Britz J Brunet D Lanz F Michel CM Rouiller EM, Whole-scalp EEG mapping of somatosensory evoked potentials in macaque monkeys: a model for lesion-dependent plasticit, in Brain Structure and Function.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Columbia University United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
EPFL Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
University Fribourg Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
University Hospital Frankfurt Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Publication
HUG Geneva, Dept. Anesthesie Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
8th Meeting of ISBEM and ISFSI Talk given at a conference EEG Microstates 13.05.2011 Banff, Canada, Canada Michel Christoph;


Self-organised

Title Date Place

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Media relations: radio, television Chaos dans le cerveau Téléjournal TSR1 Western Switzerland 2010

Awards

Title Year
Pfitzer Research Award 2012

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
111783 Imaging of clinical evoked potentials 01.06.2006 Project funding (Div. I-III)
159705 Temporal dynamics of whole-brain neuronal networks 01.05.2015 Project funding (Div. I-III)
140338 Improved prediction and monitoring of central nervous system disorders with advanced neurophysiological and genetic assessment. 01.04.2012 SPUM

Abstract

Modern cognitive and clinical neuroscience research has started to recognize that the communication within and between large-scale neuronal networks is a crucial feature of brain functioning. Both normal and deficient behavior is thereby considered in terms of function and dysfunction of networks rather than of isolated brain areas. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) coherent activity in these large-scale networks has been demonstrated not only during task performance, but also at rest. These so-called resting-state networks have very slow temporal dynamics and thus seem to reflect the intrinsic activity in anatomically connected networks, rather than the ongoing rapid conscious mental activities that are mediated by these networks. Our project focuses on the dynamics of large-scale neuronal networks in the sub-second time scale. Networks have to reorganize very rapidly in order to flexibly adapt to momentary thoughts or incoming information. In order to study these fast network dynamics we will use brain-mapping methods that are based on high-density electroencephalography (EEG), which has millisecond temporal resolution. We propose to investigate both, the spatial properties of the global EEG scalp potential field and the evolution of these potential fields over time. A series of studies over the last three decades repeatedly showed that the spatio-temporal structure of the scalp potential fields follows very idiosyncratic rules that are similar across subjects, known as EEG microstates. It has been proposed but never systematically investigated, that EEG microstates, like fMRI-defined resting state networks, reflect the intrinsic activity in anatomically connected networks, but that the temporal structure of the microstates in the sub-second time range reflects the mental acts that makes a subject conscious about himself and the environment, i.e. that the microstate topographies are the signatures of the anatomy of large-scale networks, while their temporal dynamics reveal their function. So far, EEG microstates have only been assessed in wakeful human subjects. Here, we propose to examine EEG microstates in different species and in different global functional states in order to investigate whether they are the neural correlate of the elementary building blocks of cognition. If the microstate hypothesis is correct, EEG microstates should be observable not only in wakeful humans, but also in lower species and non-conscious functional states, but with less organized or distorted temporal structure. We will benefit from several past and ongoing collaborations with different groups, where multi-channel EEG has been and will be recorded for other purposes. We will analyze existing multichannel EEG of mice, rats, monkeys, pre-term and term-born babies, 2 year old children, healthy adults at different ages, and of patients with different neuropsychiatric disorders. In most species, we will analyze EEG microstates both during wakefulness and anesthesia. We will analyze the temporal structure of the microstates using a powerful wavelet-based fractal analysis method that is able to robustly distinguish between mono- and multifractal behavior, and we will study the functional connectivity within the microstates using time varying causality measures in the inverse space.In addition to the analysis of the already available data, we will perform three new experiments, one recording EEG microstates in sleep, one recording simultaneously EEG, fMRI, respiration and blood pressure, and one looking at stimulus- and task induced microstate modulations.We are convinced that this project will provide a new approach to investigate the fundamental basics of large-scale functional networks of the brain. This method with its high temporal resolution is able to capture the rapid dynamics of the mental activities that are governed by these networks, and whose distortion may lead to the expression of several devastating neuropsychiatric diseases.
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