Project

Back to overview

SwissSIMS: A request for a Swiss National Dynamic Secondary Ion Probe Facility

English title SwissSIMS: A request for a Swiss National Dynamic Secondary Ion Probe Facility
Applicant Baumgartner Lukas P.
Number 132030
Funding scheme Research Infrastructure
Research institution Institut de Minéralogie et Géochimie Université de Lausanne
Institution of higher education University of Lausanne - LA
Main discipline Geochemistry
Start/End 01.10.2010 - 30.11.2013
Approved amount 3'000'000.00
Show all

All Disciplines (7)

Discipline
Geochemistry
Other disciplines of Earth Sciences
Geochronology
Mineralogy
Material Sciences
Palaeontology
Geology

Keywords (4)

Dynamic Secondary Ion Micro Probe (SIMS); trace elements; dating; Swiss National Facility

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary

This project aims at building a state of the artanalytical laboratory for solid materials. The facility is conceived as a SwissNational research facility, designed to resolve analytical questions withrespect to geo-science materials and solid material in general. Thiscentralized facility will house a CAMECA IMS 1280 secondary ion microprobe,which operates in dynamic mode. This SIMS is capable of analyzing theabundances of all elements of the periodic table (with few exceptions, notablynoble gases) with high precision and detection limits at the pg/g level. Inaddition, it is possible with this newest generation of SIMS to measure manyratios of stable and radiogenic isotopes with a precision needed in materialand Earth system sciences. SIMS instruments can measure quantitatively theconcentrations and isotopic abundances of light elements with the precision andspatial resolution required to address many leading questions in thegeosciences and in material science.

 

The SwissSIMS facility will offer the Swissresearch community the unique possibility to conduct cutting-edge research inareas of environmental mineralogy and geochemistry, material sciences,experimental petrology, and paleoclimate studies, as well as high-resolutiongeochronology, and studies of processes relevant to the evolution of theEarth's crust-mantle-core system. The Universities of Bern, Geneva, Lausanneand the ETHZ, jointly finance the acquisition of the instrument, with half ofthe cost provided by the SNF.

 

 

Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Martin Whithouse, Sweedish Museum of Natural History Sweden (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure
University of Wisconsin United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results

Scientific events



Self-organised

Title Date Place
Inauguration du Centre de compétence en analyse de surface des matériaux 13.06.2013 Université de Lausanne, Switzerland

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
163187 Hydration and carbonation of mantle peridotite: Drilling the Atlantis Massif (MAR 30°N) and the Samail ophiolite (Oman) 01.01.2016 Project funding (Div. I-III)
163984 A new termal ionization mass spectrometer for high-precision U-Pb geochronology 01.12.2015 R'EQUIP
163073 Drilling the Atlantis Massif (MAR 30°N) and the Samail ophiolite (Oman) 01.07.2016 Research Infrastructure

Abstract

We propose to build a Swiss National Dynamic Ion Microprobe facility called SwissSIMS. This centralized facility will house a CAMECA IMS 1280 secondary ion microprobe, which operates in dynamic mode. This SIMS is capable of analyzing the abundances of all elements of the periodic table (with few exceptions, notably noble gases) with high precision and detection limits at the pg/g level. In addition, it is possible with this newest generation of SIMS to measure many ratios of stable and radiogenic isotopes with a precision needed in material and Earth system sciences. The surface can be ablated at constant rates, resulting in a spectacular resolution in depth profiling of less than 100 nm. SIMS instruments are the only analytical tool that can measure quantitatively the concentrations and isotopic abundances of light elements with the precision and spatial resolution required to address many leading questions in the geosciences and in material science. The SwissSIMS facility will offer the Swiss research community the unique possibility to conduct cutting-edge research in areas of environmental mineralogy and geochemistry, material sciences, experimental petrology, and paleoclimate studies, as well as high-resolution geochronology, and studies of processes relevant to the evolution of the Earth's crust-mantle-core system. The ability to obtain halogen and other light element abundances on spatial scales of a hundred nanometers to micrometers allows for detailed investigations into element cycles, from the mineral-surface scale to outcrop scale or even crustal and ultimately the planetary scale. The fact that this facility will be supported by the diverse research communities and at the Universities of Bern, Fribourg, Geneva, Lausanne and the ETHZ attests to the broad interest among the Swiss scientific community.There are presently only a few dynamic SIMS facilities in Europe and elsewhere, but no such instrument is currently available in Switzerland. Several of us have used or are using SIMS in other countries. While in principle Swiss scientists do have access to these facilities, access is in fact limited. We are confident that the SwissSIMS will significantly enhance the scientific scope and output of the Swiss geosciences/material sciences community, and these Swiss communities will develop new approaches to lead research in the domain of nano-science, a domain where this exciting new analytical tool is of fundamental importance to the success of a wide range of future research projects. An offer from CAMECA was obtained for a fully equipped IMS 1280. It represents an investment of roughly 6 MFr. Continued financial support of the facility will be assured through the scientific interests of the researchers from the different Swiss universities and their host institutions, which will be contributing to this investment. This proposed instrument is optimized for mass resolution, while maintaining flexibility with respect to its use. We are convinced that the creation of a Swiss National Facility is the only way to successfully utilize this expensive equipment on a 24/7 basis, thereby making full use of the capacity of a SIMS. The active involvement of researchers from the different Swiss universities will be important for the success in jointly operating this national facility. Funds requested: This proposal asks for ca 45% matching funds for an IMS 1280 analyzer, as well as for 3 years of salary for an academic technician, maintenance for two years, as well as travel costs necessary in setting up the facility.
-