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Evolution of metapopulation structure under local adaptation

Titel Englisch Evolution of metapopulation structure under local adaptation
Gesuchsteller/in Vuilleumier Séverine
Nummer 130065
Förderungsinstrument Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)
Forschungseinrichtung Département d'Ecologie et d'Evolution Faculté de Biologie et de Médecine Université de Lausanne
Hochschule Universität Lausanne - LA
Hauptdisziplin Oekologie
Beginn/Ende 01.09.2010 - 31.08.2013
Bewilligter Betrag 153'489.00
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Keywords (4)

Evolution of metapopulation structure; Modelling; Spatially-explicit; Simulations

Lay Summary (Englisch)

Lead
Lay summary
Ecology, genetics and evolution of metapopulations depend on the patterns, types and rate of migration between local populations, which confer to the metapopulation its structure. It thus important to quantify the probability that individual leaves a population as well as its probability to contribute to the gene pool in a given population. At metapopulation level, this translates into the quantification of the migration distance between populations as well as the forward and backward migration rate.When populations differ in size and in quality, two main models of migration type that characterizes the rate of individual exchanges between populations can be found in the literature. They are the source-sink and the balanced migration model. For the migration distance, most of theoretical models use either extreme models of isolation by distance: the stepping-stone model and island model or a restricted family of dispersal distance distributions. In theoretical studies, models of migration are often used without justification even if they can have drastic consequences on the prediction of the ecology, genetic and evolution of metapopulation. This research project proposes to model, using simulations, the evolution of migration rate and distance in a metapopulation in order to delineate the conditions under which some metapopulation structures are more likely to emerge. The model will characterize how migration rate and distance can evolve in heterogeneous and fragmented populations when the following main forces are acting: local adaptation, kin competition, spatial heterogeneity and distance-dependent cost of dispersal. Various forms of habitats distributions, heterogeneity and fragmentation will be investigated. The results of this project will show under which conditions a metapopulation structure is more likely to emerge and how fragmentation and habitat heterogeneity can affect the evolution of migration rate and distance of a population. The expected results are directly relevant to conservation (e.g. estimation metapopulation viability, re-colonization potential, genetic diversity), and to the evolution of populations (e.g. adaptation to novel environment, coevolutionary dynamics, evolution of marginal population). The latter aspect appears particularly important has species might have to adapt their dispersal abilities face to climate change and the constant increases of fragmentation of the environment.
Direktlink auf Lay Summary Letzte Aktualisierung: 21.02.2013

Verantw. Gesuchsteller/in und weitere Gesuchstellende

Mitarbeitende

Publikationen

Publikation
Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics.
Joost S, Vuilleumier S., Jensen J.D., Schoville S., Leempoel K., Stucki S., Widmer I., Melodelima C., Rolland J., Mantel S. (2013), Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics., in Molecular Ecology, 22(14), 3659-3665.
Peak and persistent excess of genetic diversity following an abrupt migration increase.
Alcala N., Streit D., Goudet J., Vuilleumier S. (2013), Peak and persistent excess of genetic diversity following an abrupt migration increase., in Genetics, 193(3), 953-971.
Transitions from reproductive systems governed by two self-incompatible loci to one in fungi.
Vuilleumier Séverine, Alcala Nicolas, Niculita-Hirzel Hélène (2013), Transitions from reproductive systems governed by two self-incompatible loci to one in fungi., in Evolution, 67(2), 501-516.
Dispersal Strategies, Few Dominating or Many Coexisting: The Effect of Environmental Spatial Structure and Multiple Sources of Mortality.
Büchi Lucie, Vuilleumier Séverine (2012), Dispersal Strategies, Few Dominating or Many Coexisting: The Effect of Environmental Spatial Structure and Multiple Sources of Mortality., in Plos One, 7(4), pp. e34733-pp. e34733.
Interacting populations in heterogeneous environments.
Vuilleumier Séverine, Buttler Alexandre, Perrin Nicolas, Yearsley J.M. (2012), Interacting populations in heterogeneous environments., in Ecological Modelling, 228, 96-105.
Invasion and eradication of a competitively superior species in heterogeneous landscapes
Vuilleumier S., Buttler A., Perrin N., Yearsley J. M. (2011), Invasion and eradication of a competitively superior species in heterogeneous landscapes, in Ecological Modelling, 222(3), 398-406.
Evolution in heterogeneous populations From migration models to fixation probabilities
Vuilleumier S., Goudet J., Perrin N. (2010), Evolution in heterogeneous populations From migration models to fixation probabilities, in Theoretical Population Biology, 78(4), 250-258.
Effects of colonization asymmetries on metapopulation persistence
Vuilleumier S., Bolker B. M., Leveque O. (2010), Effects of colonization asymmetries on metapopulation persistence, in Theoretical Population Biology, 78(3), 225-238.
Evolution of uni- and bifactorial sexual compatibility systems in fungi.
Nieuwenhuis B.P.S., Billiard S., Vuilleumier S., Petit E., Hood M.E., Giraud T., Evolution of uni- and bifactorial sexual compatibility systems in fungi., in Heredity.

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Kommunikation mit der Öffentlichkeit

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Verbundene Projekte

Nummer Titel Start Förderungsinstrument
139421 Gene dynamics in heterogeneous metapopulations 01.01.2012 Ambizione

Abstract

Ecology, genetics and evolution of metapopulations depend on the patterns, types and rate of migration between local populations, which confer to the metapopulation its structure. It thus important to quantify the probability that individual leaves a population as well as its probability to contribute to the gene pool in a given population. At metapopulation level, this translates into the quantification of the migration distance between populations as well as the forward and backward migration rate.When populations differ in size and in quality, two main models of migration type that characterizes the rate of individual exchanges between populations can be found in the literature. They are the source-sink and the balanced migration model. For the migration distance, most of theoretical models use either extreme models of isolation by distance: the stepping-stone model and island model or a restricted family of dispersal distance distributions. In theoretical studies, models of migration are often used without justification even if they can have drastic consequences on the prediction of the ecology, genetic and evolution of metapopulation. This research project proposes to model, using simulations, the evolution of migration rate and distance in a metapopulation in order to delineate the conditions under which some patterns of migration are more likely to emerge. The model will characterize how migration rate and distance can evolve in heterogeneous and fragmented populations when the following main forces are acting: local adaptation, kin competition, spatial heterogeneity and distance-dependent cost of dispersal. Various forms of habitat distribution, heterogeneity and fragmentation will be investigated. The results of this project will show under which conditions a metapopulation structure is more likely to emerge and how fragmentation and habitat heterogeneity can affect the evolution of migration rate and distance of a population. The expected results are directly relevant to conservation (e.g. estimation metapopulation viability, re-colonization potential, genetic diversity), and to the evolution of populations (e.g. adaptation to novel environment, coevolutionary dynamics, evolution of marginal population). The latter aspect appears particularly important has species might have to adapt their dispersal abilities face to climate change and the constant increases of fragmentation of the environment.
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