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GOSPEL: Graphene-Organic Supramolecular Functional Composites

English title GOSPEL: Graphene-Organic Supramolecular Functional Composites
Applicant Fasel Roman
Number 129372
Funding scheme Project funding (special)
Research institution EMPA
Institution of higher education Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology - EMPA
Main discipline Condensed Matter Physics
Start/End 01.06.2010 - 31.05.2013
Approved amount 358'408.00
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All Disciplines (3)

Discipline
Condensed Matter Physics
Physical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry

Keywords (9)

graphene; self-assembly and self-organisation; supramolecular chemistry; molecular adsorption; organic synthesis; multiscale characterization; computational modelling; device fabrication; scanning probe microscopy

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Organic semiconductors, despite intense research performed worldwide, still suffer of much worse electric properties compared to their inorganic counterparts such as silicon. The idea behind the GOSPEL project is to couple two building blocks, one organic and one inorganic, having good affinity with each other, to obtain an innovative and highly defined nanostructured material. Inspired by the re-known use of "surfactants" exposing pyrene and perylene head-groups to promote the solubilization of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide in various solvents, the self-assembly between partially exfoliated graphite "particles" and properly designed nanographene molecules exposing different side-substituents will be used to form graphene-organic hybrids (GOH). We thus propose the combination of supramolecular chemistry of multifunctional polyaromatic systems with graphene, producing a wide range of new hybrid architectures which will combine the excellent electrical properties of graphene with the processability, chemical versatility and optical properties of more conventional, organic molecules, to ultimately produce hybrid materials with tunable physico-chemical properties (mechanical, electrical and photophysical) leading to a wide range of GOH-based devices.The GOSPEL project thus aims at developing a radically new class of graphene-based materials, which will combine the excellent electronic and mechanical properties of graphene with the processability and tunability of organic semiconductors. To this end, the GOSPEL project integrates complementary approaches belonging to different disciplines, including the synthesis of new supramolecular components with pre-programmed functions and semiconducting properties, self-assembly in solution of GOHs, multiscale optoelectronic characterization of hybrid structures, time and scale dependent characterization at surfaces by spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopies, wiring of GOH single sheets to metallic nanoelectrodes, and fabrication of prototypes of optoelectronic devices.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Name Institute

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
140812 Applied nanoscience: novel catalysts and bottom-up design of graphene-like nanostructures. Computational insight within a surface science laboratory 01.09.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)
121344 PEARL: A new bending-magnet endstation for state-of-the-art X-ray Photoelectron Diffraction combined with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy characterization at the Swiss Light Source 01.10.2009 R'EQUIP
120130 Understanding and controlling supramolecular network formation (CONE) 01.05.2009 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

Organic semiconductors, despite intense research performed worldwide, still suffer of much worse electric properties compared to their inorganic counterparts such as silicon. The idea behind the GOSPEL project is to couple two building blocks, one organic and one inorganic, having good af-finity with each other, to obtain an innovative and highly defined nanostructured material. Inspired by the re-known use of “surfactants” exposing pyrene and perylene head-groups to promote the solubilization of carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide in various solvents, the self-assembly be-tween partially exfoliated graphite “particles” and properly designed nanographene molecules ex-posing different side-substituents will be used to form graphene-organic hybrids (GOH). We thus propose the combination of supramolecular chemistry of multifunctional polyaromatic systems with graphene, producing a wide range of new hybrid architectures which will combine the excellent electrical properties of graphene with the processability, chemical versatility and optical properties of more conventional, organic molecules, to ultimately produce hybrid materials with tunable phys-ico-chemical properties (mechanical, electrical and photophysical) leading to a wide range of GOH-based devices.The GOSPEL project thus aims at developing a radically new class of graphene-based materials, which will combine the excellent electronic and mechanical properties of graphene with the proc-essability and tunability of organic semiconductors. To this end, the GOSPEL project integrates complementary approaches belonging to different disciplines, including the synthesis of new su-pramolecular components with pre-programmed functions and semiconducting properties, self-assembly in solution of GOHs, multiscale optoelectronic characterization of hybrid structures, time and scale dependent characterization at surfaces by spectroscopy and scanning probe micro-scopies, wiring of GOH single sheets to metallic nanoelectrodes, and fabrication of prototypes of optoelectronic devices.
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