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Determinants of Rock-Paper-Scissors Social Systems and its importance for speciation

Titel Englisch Determinants of Rock-Paper-Scissors Social Systems and its importance for speciation
Gesuchsteller/in Fitze Patrick Stefan
Nummer 128375
Förderungsinstrument SNF-Förderungsprofessuren
Forschungseinrichtung Département d'Ecologie et d'Evolution Faculté de Biologie et de Médecine Université de Lausanne
Hochschule Universität Lausanne - LA
Hauptdisziplin Oekologie
Beginn/Ende 01.11.2010 - 31.10.2014
Bewilligter Betrag 1'499'141.00
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Alle Disziplinen (3)

Disziplin
Oekologie
Zoologie
Molekularbiologie

Keywords (10)

Population dynamics; Rock-Paper-Scissors Game; Frequency Dependent Selection; Sexual Selection; Coloration; Populations Experiments; Common Lizard; Lacerta vivipara; Lacerta (Zootoca) vivipara; Frequency-Dependent Selection

Lay Summary (Englisch)

Lead
Lay summary
There are several hypotheses how new species are generated. New species may arise due to vicariant speciation, where a barrier is built up that cannot be crossed by individuals and that separates a species into independent units, which are no longer in contact. Sooner or later independent species may evolve. New species may as well evolve due to adaptation and colonization of a new, distinct ecological niche and a third mechanism explaining speciation is sympatric speciation, where new species evolve at the very same location. It is generally accepted that sexual selection may be at the origin of sympatric speciation and a recent model suggests that rock-paper-scissors (RPS) social systems may lead to rapid socially mediated speciation. RPS games are characterized by three behavioural or evolutionary strategies, which are similar to the game played by children, where rock crushes scissors, paper wraps rock, and scissors cut paper. Each of the three strategies wins over one and loose over another strategy. Thus, none of the strategies wins always and thus wining or loosing depends on the frequency of the other strategies. For example, if there are 10 children playing the RPS game, 7 are playing rock, 2 paper and 1 scissors, then paper has an advantage since it wins in 70% of the cases, wile it looses in 10% of the cases. If paper is frequent, it looses its advantage and scissors become more successful. Thus, the rare strategy has an advantage, which is called negative-frequency dependent selection. The existence of negative-frequency dependent selection suggests that the three strategies may coexist, rather than produce new species. Nevertheless, it has recently been shown that RPS games may lead to speciation and it has even been suggested that RPS games may lead to big radiations. This finding is of particular interest given that RPS social systems have been described in reptiles, fish, insects, isopodes, plants, and bacteria, and given that the mechanisms leading to rapid speciation are not well understood. Although theoretical research successfully linked RPS games to rapid speciation, empirical data and experimental prove for the mechanisms driving RPS games is scarce. This project will fill this gap by experimentally demonstrating the mechanisms driving the observed RPS dynamics and by investigating whether the conditions allowing for socially mediated speciation are fulfilled. Research will be conducted in Pyrenean populations of the common lizard (Lacerta vivipara), where three male colour morphs coexist, that show negative frequency-dependent population dynamics.
Direktlink auf Lay Summary Letzte Aktualisierung: 21.02.2013

Verantw. Gesuchsteller/in und weitere Gesuchstellende

Mitarbeitende

Publikationen

Publikation
Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations
San-Jose L.M. Peñalver-Alcázar M. Milá B. Gonzalez-Jimena V. Fitze P.S. (2014), Cumulative frequency-dependent selective episodes allow for rapid morph cycles and rock-paper-scissors dynamics in species with overlapping generations, in Proceedings of the Royal Society. B Biological Sciences , 281(1788), 20140976.
Frequency-dependent sexual selection with respect to offspring fitness returns is consistent with predictions from rock-paper-scissors dynamics in the European common lizard
Fitze P.S. Gonzalez Jimena V. San-Jose L.M. Heulin B. Sinervo B. (2014), Frequency-dependent sexual selection with respect to offspring fitness returns is consistent with predictions from rock-paper-scissors dynamics in the European common lizard, in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 2, 1 / 77-11.
Geographical and temporal body size variation in a reptile: roles of sex, ecology, phylogeny and ecology structured in phylogeny
Aragon P Fitze P.S (2014), Geographical and temporal body size variation in a reptile: roles of sex, ecology, phylogeny and ecology structured in phylogeny, in PLoS One, 9(8), e104026.
An ecomorphological analysis of the determinants of mating success.
Huyghe K. San-Jose L. Peñalver M. Fitze P.S. (2013), An ecomorphological analysis of the determinants of mating success., in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society , 110, 658-664.
Corticosterone regulates multiple colour traits in Lacerta [Zootoca] vivipara males
San-Jose L.M. Fitze P.S. (2013), Corticosterone regulates multiple colour traits in Lacerta [Zootoca] vivipara males, in Journal of evolutionary biology, 26, 2681-2690.
Independent sources of condition dependency and multiple pathways determine a composite trait: lessons from carotenoid-based plumage colouration
Romero-Diaz C Richner H Granado-Lorencio F Tschirren B Fitze PS (2013), Independent sources of condition dependency and multiple pathways determine a composite trait: lessons from carotenoid-based plumage colouration, in Journal of Evolutionary Biology , 26, 635-646.
Iridophores and not carotenoids account for chromatic variation of carotenoid-based coloration in common lizards (Lacerta vivipara).
San Jose L Granado-Lorenico F. Sinervo B. Fitze P.S. (2013), Iridophores and not carotenoids account for chromatic variation of carotenoid-based coloration in common lizards (Lacerta vivipara)., in American Naturalist, 181, 396-409.
Length of activity season drives geographic variation in body size of widely distributed lizard.
Horáthová T. Cooney C.R. Fitze P.S. Oksanen T.A. Jelic D. Ghira I. Uller T. Jandzik D. (2013), Length of activity season drives geographic variation in body size of widely distributed lizard., in Ecology and Evolution, 3, 2424-2442.
Multilocus phylogeography of the common lizard Zootoca vivipara at the Ibero-Pyrenean suture zone reveals lowland barriers and high-elevation introgression.
Milá B. Surget-Groba Y. Heulin B. Gosá A. Fitze P.S (2013), Multilocus phylogeography of the common lizard Zootoca vivipara at the Ibero-Pyrenean suture zone reveals lowland barriers and high-elevation introgression., in BMC Evolutionary Biology, 13, 192.
Reproductive allocation strategies: a long-term study on proximate factors and temporal adjustments in a viviparous lizard.
Bleu J. Le Galliard J.-F. Fitze P. S. Meylan S. Clobert J. Massot M. (2013), Reproductive allocation strategies: a long-term study on proximate factors and temporal adjustments in a viviparous lizard., in Oecologia, 171, 141-151.
Blood corticosterone levels and intersexual selection games: best-of-bad-job strategies of male common lizards
Gonzalez-Jimena V, Fitze PS (2012), Blood corticosterone levels and intersexual selection games: best-of-bad-job strategies of male common lizards, in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 66, 162-169.
Can we disentangle predator-prey interactions from species distributions at a macro-scale? A case study with a raptor species
Aragón Pedro (2012), Can we disentangle predator-prey interactions from species distributions at a macro-scale? A case study with a raptor species, in Oikos, 122, 64-72.
Dietary lipids reduce the expression of carotenoid-based coloration in Lacerta vivipara.
San Jose L. Granado F. Fitze PS. (2012), Dietary lipids reduce the expression of carotenoid-based coloration in Lacerta vivipara., in Functional Ecology, 26(3), 646-656.
Dispersal ability modulates the strength of the latitudinal richness gradient in European beetles
Baselga Andrés (2012), Dispersal ability modulates the strength of the latitudinal richness gradient in European beetles, in Global Ecology and Biogeography , 21, 1106-1113.
Patterns of phenotypic variation reveal substantial differentiation in sexual dimorphism of three Psammodromus (Squamata, Lacertidae) species
San Jose LM Gonzalez-Jimena V Fitze PS (2012), Patterns of phenotypic variation reveal substantial differentiation in sexual dimorphism of three Psammodromus (Squamata, Lacertidae) species, in Contributions to Zoology , 81, 181-197.
Predicted effect of climate change on the invisibility and distribution of the Western corn root-worm
Aragón Pedro (2012), Predicted effect of climate change on the invisibility and distribution of the Western corn root-worm, in Agricultural and Forest Entomology , 14, 13-18.
VITAMIN E, VITAMIN A, AND CAROTENOIDS IN MALE COMMON LIZARD TISSUES
San-Jose Luis Martin, Granado-Lorencio Fernando, Fitze Patrick S. (2012), VITAMIN E, VITAMIN A, AND CAROTENOIDS IN MALE COMMON LIZARD TISSUES, in Herpetologica, 68(1), 88-99.
Inconsistency between Different Measures of Sexual Selection
Fitze PS, Le Galliard JF (2011), Inconsistency between Different Measures of Sexual Selection, in AMERICAN NATURALIST, 178(2), 256-268.
Mating does not influence reproductive investment, in a viviparous lizard
Bleu J, Le Galliard J-F, Meylan S, Massot M, Fitze PS (2011), Mating does not influence reproductive investment, in a viviparous lizard, in Journal of Experimental Zoology Part A: Ecological Genetics and Physiology, 315 A(8), 458-464.
A matter of time: delayed mate encounter postpones mating window initiation and reduces the strength of female choosiness
Breedveld MC Fitze PS, A matter of time: delayed mate encounter postpones mating window initiation and reduces the strength of female choosiness, in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology.
Communal egg-laying in oviparous Zootoca vivipara louislantzi of the Central Pyrenees
Peñalver-Alcázar M Romero-Diaz C Fitze PS, Communal egg-laying in oviparous Zootoca vivipara louislantzi of the Central Pyrenees, in Herpetology Notes, 8.

Wissenschaftliche Veranstaltungen

Aktiver Beitrag

Titel Art des Beitrags Titel des Artikels oder Beitrages Datum Ort Beteiligte Personen
Sociedad de Española de Etología (SEE) Einzelvortrag Implications of carotenoid - based Coloration for sexual selection and population dynamics 05.09.2014 Barcelona, Spanien Fitze Patrick Stefan;
Biology 2014 Vortrag im Rahmen einer Tagung Chromatic variation in carotenoid-based ornaments: the differential role of distinct integumentary components 13.02.2014 Geneva, Schweiz San Jose Garcia Luis Martin; Fitze Patrick Stefan;
Jahrestagung der KARCH (Koordinationsstelle fuer Amphibien- und Reptilienschutz in der Schweiz), Bern Vortrag im Rahmen einer Tagung Populationsdynamik der Waldeidechse: Auswirkungen der sexuellen Selektion 01.12.2012 Bern, Schweiz Fitze Patrick Stefan;
Congreso Herpetología 2012: XII Congreso Luso-español de Herpetología, XVI Congreso Español de Herpetología Poster Factores abióticos y bióticos determinantes de la distribución espacial de Lacerta vivipara en tres localidades del Pirineo Aragonés 01.09.2012 Murcia, Spain, Spanien Fitze Patrick Stefan; Aragon Carrera Pedro;


Verbundene Projekte

Nummer Titel Start Förderungsinstrument
152929 Determinants of Frequency-Dependent Survival Selection in Rock-Paper-Scissors Social Systems 01.11.2014 SNF-Förderungsprofessuren

Abstract

Rock-paper-scissors (RPS) social systems have been suggested to lead to socially mediated speciation, potentially leading to big radiations. While RPS social systems have previously been thought to be limited to a few special cases (e.g. Uta stansburiana), accumulating evidence indicates that rock-paper-scissors (RPS) social systems are far more widespread than previously thought (Sinervo & Calsbeek, 2006). RPS social systems are nowadays described in reptiles (e.g. Uta stansburiana, Lacerta vivipara), fish (Cyclids), insects (e.g. Ischnura elegans), isopodes (e.g. Paracerceis sculpta), plants (Lythrum salicaria), bacteria (E. coli) (Kerr et al., 2002; Sinervo & Calsbeek, 2006), and even between different species and levels of biological organization (Sinervo & Calsbeek, 2006). Most RPS social systems are suggested to arise due to frequency-dependent selection (FDS). For example, the RPS social systems described in two lizard species, are based on a male colour-polymorphism, which is linked to male reproductive strategy. In both systems it is suggested that the observed male colour-morph frequency cycles are driven by negative frequency-dependent selection (nFDS) arising due to sexual selection. While in Uta stansburiana mainly male-male competition among male colour-morphs explains the observed male colour-morph cycles, a theoretical model in Lacerta vivipara suggested that both male-male competition and context-dependent female mate choice might drive the cycles. However, nFDS may not necessarily arise due to sexual selection. It may also arise due to survival selection (e.g. predators, disease, habitat characteristics,..). Theoretical models showed that the latter might lead to rapid speciation, and they suggest that nFDS due to sexual selection will generally slow the speciation process, except under a few special circumstances (van Doorn et al., 2004). Despite the theoretically predictions and the long recognized importance of FDS selection for maintaining polymorphisms, few experimental evidence exists that unravelled the mechanisms potentially maintaining polymorphisms and it is even less clear how nFDS arises. Thus, the importance of RPS social systems in driving the evolution of colour polymorphisms and speciation is unclear.In this project we will experimentally demonstrate which mechanisms lead to FDS and to the observed male colour-morph cycling. More specifically, we will investigate whether sexual selection through male-male competition and context-dependent female mate choice affect the population dynamics of the common lizard. The results of the proposed project will also unravel whether the basic assumptions of the evolutionary models linking RPS social systems to rapid speciation are met (van Doorn et al., 2004), or whether RPS social systems may hinder speciation (Gray & McKinnon, 2007). The project involves several approaches ranging from laboratory experiments to the study of natural populations and to the experimental manipulation of semi-natural populations, all of which were successfully used in the past by the principal investigator. Some experiments will be conducted at University of Lausanne, while other experiments will be conducted in the Pyrenees at the Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, where the principal investigator built an experimental system consisting of sixteen independent semi-natural populations.
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