Project

Back to overview

Assembly of Colloidal Particles under External Chemical Stimuli

Applicant Studart André R.
Number 126646
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Departement Materialwissenschaft ETH Zürich
Institution of higher education ETH Zurich - ETHZ
Main discipline Material Sciences
Start/End 01.10.2009 - 30.09.2012
Approved amount 165'414.00
Show all

Keywords (8)

colloids; particles; directed-assembly; structure; materials; complex materials; self-assembly; aggregation

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
The systematic study of colloids has led to major scientific discoveries over the past two centuries, including for example the observation of the jittery, random motion of particulate matter in liquids by Robert Brown in 1827, and the theoretical and experimental findings of Albert Einstein and Jean-Baptiste Perrin that helped to prove the real existence of molecules in the early 1900s. Current investigations on this field are mainly focused on the use of colloidal particles as analogs of atoms and molecules to investigate open questions in condensed matter physics or as building blocks for the assembly of materials with new, unusual structures and properties. The assembly of spherical colloidal particles under external stimuli, such as gravity, confining walls and electromagnetic fields, has been extensively exploited to fabricate structures of fundamental and technological interest that cannot be obtained through self-assembly processes. While a wide variety of structures have been achieved, the use of non-spherical anisotropic particles as colloidal building blocks and chemical external stimuli to control the assembly process remains largely unexplored. Chemical triggering is likely to be the major mechanism used for the assembly of inorganic building blocks in biological structures, whereas the use of non-spherical anisotropic colloidal particles should substantially expand the possible structures that can be formed. In this context, the aim of this project is to investigate the assembly of spherical and non-spherical anisotropic colloidal particles under the influence of external chemical stimuli as a means to obtain materials with new structures and properties. To achieve this goal, we will first synthesize non-spherical particles with well defined shape and surface chemistry to be used as anisotropic building blocks. An experimental apparatus will then be set-up to investigate the assembly of these building blocks under static and dynamic external chemical stimuli. Particular attention will be given to the effect of particle size, geometry and surface chemistry on the assembly process and to the conditions required to reversibly self-assemble the particles onto a variety of different structures. Understanding the effect of external stimuli on the assembly of anisotropic particles should help the design and manufacture of novel structured materials for biomedical, sensing, optical, magnetic and electronic applications.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Stabilization mechanism of double emulsions made by microfluidics
Sander J. S., Isa L., Rühs P., Fischer P., Studart A. R. (2012), Stabilization mechanism of double emulsions made by microfluidics, in Soft Matter, 8, 11471-11477.
Magnetic Transport, Mixing and Release of Cargo with Tailored Nanoliter Droplets
Sander JS, Erb RM, Denier C, Studart AR (2012), Magnetic Transport, Mixing and Release of Cargo with Tailored Nanoliter Droplets, in ADVANCED MATERIALS, 24(19), 2582-2587.
Monodisperse Functional Colloidosomes with Tailored Nanoparticle Shells
Sander JS, Studart AR (2011), Monodisperse Functional Colloidosomes with Tailored Nanoparticle Shells, in LANGMUIR, 27(7), 3301-3307.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Swiss Soft Days 9 29.10.2012 Lausanne, Switzerland
ACS Colloids and Surfaces 2012 Symposium 10.06.2012 Baltimore, USA
Swiss Soft Days 8 01.06.2012 Geneva, Switzerland
Swiss Soft Days 6 28.10.2011 ETH Hönggerberg Zürich
Swiss Soft Days 4 03.02.2011 Nestlé Research Centre Lausanne
24th Conference of the European Colloid and Interface Society 05.09.2010 Prague, Czech Republic
Third International NanoBio Conference 24.08.2010 Zurich, Switzerland


Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
146509 Directed self-assembly and mechanics of bioinspired platelet-reinforced composites 01.06.2013 Project funding (Div. I-III)
100570 Stabilization mechanisms of nano-patricles in concentrated colloidal suspensions 01.04.2003 Project funding (Div. I-III)
116386 Directed assembly of colloids for new materials 01.08.2007 Fellowships for prospective researchers

Abstract

The systematic study of colloids has led to major scientific discoveries over the past two centuries, including for example the observation of the jittery, random motion of particulate matter in liquids by Robert Brown in 1827, and the theoretical and experimental findings of Albert Einstein and Jean-Baptiste Perrin that helped to prove the real existence of molecules in the early 1900s. Current investigations on this field are mainly focused on the use of colloidal particles as analogs of atoms and molecules to investigate open questions in condensed matter physics or as building blocks for the assembly of materials with new, unusual structures and properties. The assembly of spherical colloidal particles under external stimuli, such as gravity, confining walls and electromagnetic fields, has been extensively exploited to fabricate structures of fundamental and technological interest that cannot be obtained through self-assembly processes. While a wide variety of structures have been achieved, the use of non-spherical anisotropic particles as colloidal building blocks and chemical external stimuli to control the assembly process remains largely unexplored. Chemical triggering is likely to be the major mechanism used for the assembly of inorganic building blocks in biological structures, whereas the use of non-spherical anisotropic particles should substantially expand the possible structures that can be formed. In this context, the aim of this project is to investigate the assembly of spherical and non-spherical anisotropic colloidal particles under the influence of external chemical stimuli as a means to obtain materials with new structures and properties. To achieve this goal, we will first synthesize non-spherical particles with well defined shape and surface chemistry to be used as anisotropic building blocks. An experimental apparatus will then be set-up to investigate the assembly of these building blocks under static and dynamic external chemical stimuli. Particular attention will be given to the effect of particle size, geometry and surface chemistry on the assembly process and to the conditions required to reversibly self-assemble the particles onto a variety of different structures. Understanding the effect of external stimuli on the assembly of anisotropic particles should help the design and manufacture of novel structured materials for biomedical, sensing, optical, magnetic and electronic applications.
-