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Ignition Pulse Engineering for Enhanced Laser-Produced Plasma Light Source Performance.

Gesuchsteller/in Bleiner Davide
Nummer 125275
Förderungsinstrument Projektförderung (Abt. I-III)
Forschungseinrichtung Institut für Energietechnik ETH Zürich
Hochschule ETH Zürich - ETHZ
Hauptdisziplin Technische Physik
Beginn/Ende 01.09.2009 - 31.03.2010
Bewilligter Betrag 91'940.00
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Keywords (9)

plasma; laser; extreme ultraviolet; light source; lithography; conversion efficiency; fast spectroscopy; EUV source; debris

Lay Summary (Englisch)

Lead
Lay summary
Laser-Produced Plasmas (LPP) have a potential as laboratory-scale tunable light sources. Their implementation as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources is subject of intense R&D in the perspective of next generation lithography (EUVL). Aims of our Applied Laser Plasma Science (ALPS) program are the combined attainment of high EUV conversion efficiency and minimal LPP debris, in order to prevent rapid damage to the collection optics. Our experimental program permits to obtain data for model validation/development and to demonstrate superior performance of our lab-scale EUV light source. In fact innovative LPP ignition schemes, identified by computational studies and that need to be validated and optimized experimentally, are subject of this research proposal. The synergistic use of a coupled suite of self-developed computational tools and the remarkable pace of our achievements in modeling, requires integration with extensive experimental data. As compared to alternative research approaches for EUV light genneration, e.g. Synchrotron, High Harmonic Generation, XUV lasers, we focus on a plasma source that is competitive with the industrial specifications on cost of ownership and conversion efficiency. This will inevitably attract interest from the productive sectors in the years to come. The purpose of this proposal is to secure funding for 1 PhD student and the required instrumentation for improved laser energy coupling into the plasma light source, i.e. high repetition rate laser. The integration of our existing experimental setup with a high repetition rate laser shall allow scaling-up the average output power to the 10's watt domain by means of optical conversion of the IR drive radiation, with conversion efficiency up to a few percent. The work will be focused on optimizing the laser pulse profile for efficient energy deposition in the LPP. The PhD Student is supposed to perform a parametric study of the LPP light source performance. The key metrics in the "parametric study" are the in/out band emission and the neutral/ion debris fluxes and kinetic energy.
Direktlink auf Lay Summary Letzte Aktualisierung: 21.02.2013

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Abstract

Laser-Produced Plasmas (LPP) have a potential, among several other discussed applications, as laboratory-scale tunable light sources. Their implementation as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light sources is subject of intense R&D in the perspective of next generation lithography (EUVL). The laboratory of energy conversion (LEC) initiated in 2007 a program on the development of a LPP-based EUVL source. LEC is member of the ETHZ’s Micro-Nano Science Platform (MNSP), and a participant in the planned ETHZ/IBM nano-tech center (NEXT). Aims of our Applied Laser Plasma Science (ALPS) program are the combined attainment of high EUV conversion efficiency and minimal LPP debris, in order to prevent rapid damage to the collection optics. The unique characteristics of the LEC program are the design and operation of an experimental light source facility, and the close coupling with computational tools. The experimental program will permit to obtain data for model validation/development and to demonstrate superior performance of our lab-scale EUV light source. In fact innovative LPP ignition schemes, identified by computational studies and that need to be validated and optimized experimentally, are subject of this research proposal. The synergistic use of a coupled suite of self-developed computational tools and the remarkable pace of our achievements in modeling, requires integration with extensive experimental data. The latter will give concomitantly insights on all aspects of the LPP, namely in/out band radiation, neutral/ion debris load, and plasma atomic physics. As compared to alternative research approaches for EUV sources, e.g. Synchrotron, High Harmonic Generation, EUV lasers, we offer the candidate source that is competitive with the industrial specifications on cost of ownership and scalability. This will inevitably attract funding from the private sectors in the years to come. The purpose of this proposal is to secure funding for 1 PhD student and the required instrumentation for improved laser energy coupling into the plasma light source, i.e. CO2 laser, as well as a ultrafast EUV diagnostics. The integration of our experimental setup with a CO2 laser shall allow better conversion efficiency (CE) by means of the far IR radiation, and scalability of the source up to kHz repetition rate. The use of sub-ns time resolution streak camera shall allow validation of the computational work and fine tuning of the light source performance.The PhD Student is supposed to perform a spectroscopic study of the LPP light source performance. The key parameters in the “spectroscopic study” are the in/out band emission and the neutral/ion debris fluxes and kinetic energy distribution, as function of space and time. The CO2 laser offers the possibility to ignite a low electron density plasma, thanks to the low photon energy (0.1 eV or 10.6 µm), as compared to the visible lasers we are currently implementing. This should permit a less opaque plasma to form with enhanced radiative losses, i.e. emission intensity. Besides, the longer wavelength implies larger electron oscillation amplitude (ponderomotive force) in the LPP, thus enhancing the electron-ion collision rates. The scientific questions that need to be answered are therefore related to these points: what is the CE of a CO2 laser as a function of its intensity? What is the LPP ionization degree? What is the emission cross section? How does the LPP evolve temporally? How much a pure Sn target (solid or liquid) changes the CE versus the mass-limited Sn-doped target? How is the angular distribution as compared to the visible drive beam LPP? Does the lower ionization degree favor more extensive neutral debris and severe collector aging? Can we solve this shortcoming with a dual pulse process, even using a second wavelength? In the light of these open questions the work plan is thus structured:1.Installation of the CO2 beam and beam delivery optics.2.Spectroscopy study on the Sn soild target, with parametric scan and angular mapping.3.Spectroscopy study on the Sn liquid target, with parametric scan and angular mapping.4.Spectroscopy study on the Sn-doped mass limited target, with parametric scan and angular mapping.5.Time-resolved investigations on EUV emission, using a Streak Camera, and comparison with our computational results.6.Design and installation of a dual beam LPP ignition. Tests on in/out band emission and debris.
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