Project

Back to overview

Spin, Quantum Electronics, and Nanomechanics

Applicant Poggio Martino
Number 124394
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Departement Physik Universität Basel
Institution of higher education University of Basel - BS
Main discipline Condensed Matter Physics
Start/End 01.04.2009 - 31.03.2012
Approved amount 596'550.00
Show all

Keywords (10)

micro- and nanomechanics; ultra-sensitive force microscopy; nuclear magnetic resonance; electron magnetic resonance; magnetic resonance force microscopy; mesoscopic physics; experimental condensed matter physics; atomic force microscopy; nanomechanics; mesoscopic transport

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
Improvements in fabrication and measurement technology have spurred an intense interest in using tiny mechanical resonators to make sensitive measurements. These micro- and nanomechanical devices are being used to probe quantum states. Researchers now have the ability to study the quantum behavior of small mechanical structures, their coupling to single electron states, to spin states, to light, and to the larger environment around them. Sensors able to detect the tiny forces arising from single charges or spins allow the study of a wide class of problems in condensed matter physics. Improved understanding of these phenomena may lead to new high resolution nano- and atomic-scale imaging techniques. This proposal consists of three projects in this vein: the coupling of mechanical modes to mesoscopic transport, nano-scale magnetic resonance force microscopy, and the exploration of new materials for use in nanomechanical systems.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy
Poggio Martino, Degen Christian (2012), Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy, in Bhushan Bharat (ed.), Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1256-1264.
Probing single-charge fluctuations at a GaAs/AlAs interface using laser spectroscopy on a nearby InGaAs quantum dot
Houel Julien, Kuhlmann Andreas, Greuter Lucas, Xue Fei, Poggio Martino, Gerardot Brian, Dalgarno P. A., Badolato Antonio, Petroff Pierre, Ludwig Arne, Reuter D., Wieck A. D., Warburton Richard (2012), Probing single-charge fluctuations at a GaAs/AlAs interface using laser spectroscopy on a nearby InGaAs quantum dot, in Physical Review Letters, 108(10), 107401-107401.
A geometry for optimizing nanoscale magnetic resonance force microscopy
Xue Fei, Peddibhotla Phani, Montinaro Michele, Weber Dennis, Poggio Martino (2011), A geometry for optimizing nanoscale magnetic resonance force microscopy, in Applied Physics Letters, 98(16), 163103-163103.
Measurement of statistical nuclear spin polarization in a nanoscale GaAs sample
Xue Fei, Weber Dennis, Peddibhotla Phani, Poggio Martino (2011), Measurement of statistical nuclear spin polarization in a nanoscale GaAs sample, in Physical Review B, 84(20), 205328-205328.
Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges
Poggio Martino, Degen Christian (2010), Force-detected nuclear magnetic resonance: recent advances and future challenges, in Nanotechnology, 21(34), 342001-342001.

Collaboration

Group / person Country
Types of collaboration
Prof. Alexander Holleitner (Technishce Universität München) Germany (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Beat Meier (ETHZ) Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Connie Chang-Hasnain (University of California, Berkeley) United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Roberto Myers (Ohio State University) United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. David Awschalom (University of California, Santa Barbara) United States of America (North America)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Christian Degen (ETHZ) Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Klaus Ensslin (ETHZ) Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
Prof. Dominik Zumbühl (University of Basel) Switzerland (Europe)
- Research Infrastructure
Prof. Christian Schönenberger (University of Basel) Switzerland (Europe)
- in-depth/constructive exchanges on approaches, methods or results
- Research Infrastructure

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
Atomic, Mesoscopic, and Optical Physics Seminar, University of Cambridge Individual talk Recent progress in force-detected MRI 15.01.2012 Cambridge, UK, Great Britain and Northern Ireland Poggio Martino;
Recent Advances in Broad-Band Solid-State NMR of Correlated Electronic Systems, Talk given at a conference Recent progress in force-detected MRI 05.09.2011 Trogir, Croatia, Croatia Poggio Martino;
Magnetic Resonance Microsystems Talk given at a conference Recent progress in force-detected MRI 15.07.2011 Freiburg, Germany, Germany Poggio Martino;
Condensed Matter Seminar, Technical University Individual talk Recent progress in force-detected MRI 01.07.2011 Munich, Germany, Germany Poggio Martino;
Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques Talk given at a conference Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 28.02.2011 KIT, Karlsruhe, Germany, Germany Poggio Martino;
Nanoscience in the Snow 2011 Poster Coupoing a Cantilever to a Quantum Point Contact 01.01.2011 Les Diablerets, Switzerland, Switzerland Montinaro Michele;
Workshop on Quantum Spintronics Talk given at a conference Towards nano-MRI in mesoscopic transport systems 18.10.2010 Maratea, Italy, Italy Poggio Martino;
3rd Nano-MRI Research Conference Talk given at a conference Towards nano-MRI in mesoscopic transport systems 12.07.2010 Domaine du Tremblay, France, France Poggio Martino;
Annual Meeting of the Swiss Physical Society Talk given at a conference Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 22.06.2010 Basel, Switzerland, Switzerland Poggio Martino;
Zurich Physics Colloquium at the ETH Individual talk Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 12.05.2010 Zürich, Switzerland, Switzerland Poggio Martino;
Physics Department Seminar at the University of Pavia Individual talk Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 10.05.2010 Pavia, Italy, Italy Poggio Martino;
Edgar Lscher Seminar 2010: Neues aus der Festkrperphysik Talk given at a conference Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 01.02.2010 Klosters, Switzerland, Switzerland Poggio Martino;
National School on the Physics of Matter: Physics of Spin in Materials Talk given at a conference Magnetic resonance imaging with nanomechanics 01.11.2009 Chiavari, Italy, Italy Poggio Martino;
InternationalWorkshop and School on Solid State Based Quantum Information Processing Talk given at a conference Ultra-sensitive force detection applied to magnetic resonance imaging 01.07.2009 Herrsching, Germany, Germany Poggio Martino;
Spin and Charge Properties of Low Dimensional Systems Talk given at a conference Ultra-sensitive force detection applied to magnetic resonance imaging 01.06.2009 Sibiu, Romania, Romania Poggio Martino;
Swiss Nano 2009 Talk given at a conference Ultra-sensitive force detection applied to magnetic resonance imaging 01.06.2009 Basel, Switzerland, Switzerland Poggio Martino;


Self-organised

Title Date Place
Quantum Optics of Micro- and Nanomechanical Systems (QOMNS) 24.07.2011 Monte Verità, Switzerland, Switzerland

Communication with the public

Communication Title Media Place Year
Talks/events/exhibitions Talk to students and parents at International School Basel Western Switzerland 2012
New media (web, blogs, podcasts, news feeds etc.) Taking MRI to the nanoscale by force Nanotechweb.org Rhaeto-Romanic Switzerland International Western Switzerland Italian-speaking Switzerland German-speaking Switzerland 2010

Awards

Title Year
Cozzarelli Prize (PNAS) 2010

Associated projects

Number Title Start Funding scheme
140478 Spin, Quantum Electronics, and Nanomechanics 01.04.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)
140478 Spin, Quantum Electronics, and Nanomechanics 01.04.2012 Project funding (Div. I-III)

Abstract

Improvements in fabrication and measurement technology have spurred an intense interest in using ultrasensitive micro- and nanomechanical resonators to probe quantum states. Researchers now have the ability to study the quantum behavior of small mechanical structures, their coupling to single electron states, to spin states, to light, and to the larger environment around them. Sensors able to detect the tiny forces arising from single charges or spins allow the study of a wide class of problems in condensed matter physics. Improved understanding of these phenomena may lead to new high resolution nano- and atomic-scale imaging techniques. This proposal consists of three projects in this vein: the coupling of mechanical modes to mesoscopic transport, nano-scale magnetic resonance force microscopy, and the exploration of new materials for use in nanomechanical systems. The coupling of mechanical modes to mesoscopic transport (project A) represents an exciting new direction whose pursuit has a variety of possible implications. In recent years, technologies have emerged -- more or less independently -- to fabricate both nanomechanical oscillators and tunable single electron devices. As a result, mechanical oscillators can now be coupled to quantized states such as single charges or spins. Such coupled systems have implications not only for quantum measurement but also as a means for manipulating quantum states. We intend to couple resonators to a variety of mesoscopic few-electron devices such as quantum point contacts (QPCs), quantum dots (QDs), and Mach-Zehnder interferometers. From a practical perspective, such systems provide an avenue for designing sensitive detectors of mechanical displacement -- detectors which approach the quantum limit. Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and its subsequent extension into the nanoscale (project B) combine the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the techniques of scanning probe microscopy. MRFM has now been used both to measure magnetic resonance from a single electron spin and for nuclear MRI with a spatial resolution better than 10 nm. We propose to use the technique to study a variety of nanoscale spin systems -- both nuclear and electronic -- especially systems, which cannot be addressed by conventional optical or magnetic resonance techniques. We also aim to implement improvements in speed and sensitivity that will enable both higher spatial resolution and possibly the ability to read-out single electron spin states in real time, a feat not yet accomplished by groups in the field. The exploration of new materials for use in nanomechanical systems (project C) is a vital research area for the improvement of future nanomechanical systems (NEMS). Currently, the vast majority of NEMS are made from single-crystal Si or Si-based materials such as SiN. Despite its many advantages, the use of Si has problems as well, including poor electronic and optical properties, the presence of a variety of defects, and apparent limitations in mechanical dissipation. We will investigate the physics behind these dissipation mechanisms including mechanical energy loss due to non-contact friction, paramagnetic impurities, and other contaminants. We will also explore the use of mechanical resonators made from a variety of carbon-based materials, GaAs, and nanowires. The main applicant, Prof. Dr. Martino Poggio, has recently been elected Argovia Professor in the Physics Department at the University of Basel. He is designing a new laboratory and will be starting in January 2009. He received his A.B. in physics from Harvard in 2000 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2005. He has a strong background in semiconductor spintronics and ultrafast optics, having worked for Prof. David Awschalom in graduate school. His expertise and interest in nanomechanics and ultrasensitive force microscopy come from 3 years of working with experts in the field at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, CA. There he worked as a post-doctoral researcher in Dr. Dan Rugar's lab on several projects including high sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance force microscopy. As part of the Center for Probing the Nanoscale, a joint center between Stanford and IBM, he collaborated with Prof. David Goldhaber-Gordon on a project combining micromechanics with quantum transport. Together with colleagues in Basel and with his Swiss and international collaborators, Prof. Poggio's e ort will be of the highest caliber.
-