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Neural representations of internal models for tool use

English title Neural representations of internal models for tool use
Applicant Lutz Kai
Number 111777
Funding scheme Project funding (Div. I-III)
Research institution Lehrstuhl für Neuropsychologie Psychologisches Institut Universität Zürich
Institution of higher education University of Berne - BE
Main discipline Neurophysiology and Brain Research
Start/End 01.09.2006 - 31.12.2009
Approved amount 241'325.00
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Keywords (9)

motor systems; fMRI; internal models; feedback processing; tool-use; neuroimaging; eeg; visual; audiory

Lay Summary (English)

Lead
Lay summary
To know the consequences of ones own actions is of immense importance. A wealth of research has established evidence that the central nervous system contains representations of internal models, which - if trained correctly - can predict sensory consequences of issued motor commands and, vice versa, can calculate necessary motor commands from desired sensory goals. Such models are helpful to distinguish self caused from environmentally caused sensations, but also seem to be involved in self recognition, formation of a body scheme, and the sense of agency. The proposed project aims at investigating the way how the nervous system acquires internal models for motor control and the how it reacts to disturbances in the relationship between motor action and expected consequence. Hereby, special attention will be given to the capability of such models to predict auditory or visual consequences of motor activities in certain environments (tool use). Until now, visual consequences have received almost exclusive attention by researchers. However, in dissociating sensory modalities, we expect to be able to shed further light on the relative contribution of cerebellar and parietal or possibly other cortical areas relevant for predictive networks. Four experiments are proposed to investigate the topic. Mainly, we use a combined approach of fMRI and EEG recordings to delineate neural systems which are relevant for the question under investigation. This approach allows us to identify and accurately localize regions of increased activation and further on describe their communication and further descriptions of dynamic activity changes on a fine temporal scale. In the proposed experiments, we will investigate 1) tool-use learning with transformations of motor activity into visuospatial, visual (non-spatial) and auditory sensory consequences. This experiment will provide further insight in the role of the parietal lobe for internal models. We will further investigate 2) the reaction of an internal model to disturbances of tool transformations.
Direct link to Lay Summary Last update: 21.02.2013

Responsible applicant and co-applicants

Employees

Publications

Publication
Motor and nonmotor error and the influence of error magnitude on brain activity
Nadig Karin, Jäncke Lutz, Lüchinger Roger, Jaencke Lutz (2009), Motor and nonmotor error and the influence of error magnitude on brain activity, in EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH , 202(1), 45-54.
Coherent intracerebral brain oscillations during learned continuous tracking movements
Blum Julia, Lutz Kai, Pascual-Marqui Roberto, Murer Kurt, Jäncke Lutz (2008), Coherent intracerebral brain oscillations during learned continuous tracking movements, in Experimental Brain Research, 443-451.
Coherence and phase locking of intracerebral activation during visuo- and audio-motor learning of continuous tracking movements.
Blum Julia, Lutz Kai, Jäncke Lutz (2007), Coherence and phase locking of intracerebral activation during visuo- and audio-motor learning of continuous tracking movements., in Experimental Brain research, 182, 59-69.
The rewarding value of good motor performance in the context of monetary incentives
Lutz Kai, Pedroni Andreas, Nadig Karin, Lüchinger Roger, Jäncke Lutz, The rewarding value of good motor performance in the context of monetary incentives, in Neuropsychologia.

Scientific events

Active participation

Title Type of contribution Title of article or contribution Date Place Persons involved
14th annual meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping 15.06.2008 Melbourne


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